How to keep on top of your referencing

Person writing list

Referencing is a big part of uni. It’s how you clearly and consistently acknowledge all the information sources you have used in your work.

Being such an essential skill, we recommend you become proficient at it.

As an undergraduate student where you’re generally writing shorter assignments (I know, 2000 words isn’t that short – but hey, it’s shorter than a dissertation!) we suggest you use our referencing tool to guide you with your referencing. The referencing tool is designed to provide you with examples of direct quotations, paraphrasing and full references for a range of resources you may have used when researching a topic. Over time you’ll build up your skills in this area, and know what a reference should look like.

As you move towards more lengthy assignments, research papers, and so forth, you may be struggling to stay on top of the massive array of resources you’ve used.

Enter: EndNote.

EndNote is Griffith’s recommended bibliographic management software, and enables you to easily:

  • Collect references
  • Organise references and documents in a searchable library
  • Create instant reference lists and/or bibliographies

It’s super handy if you have a large amount of research you need to organise. You are able to store all the citations in one place, and easily insert them straight into Word. And, as soon as you insert an in-text reference into word, the full reference will be added to the document’s Reference List section.

Best part – it updates. If you decide to remove a section of text, which may have had an in text reference used nowhere else, this reference will automatically be removed from your Reference List too #timesaver.

Ok, another best part. It’s free!

To get EndNote, follow the instructions on the EndNote page to download it.

For more information on referencing, check out our referencing study smart page.

 


Referencing made easy

Photo of woman on laptop

Referencing can seem like an enormous and complex task, especially when you have amassed a stack of resources for your essay.

But like anything, once you break it down into manageable chunks, it’s really not scary at all. Luckily, our Study Smart tutorial on referencing can help break referencing down into four easy steps.

1. Choose your referencing style

You can, in some instances, make this choice, but mostly your Course or School dictates which referencing style you are to follow. It’s your responsibility to find out what referencing style you are required to use, and to locate the correct style guide.

Common styles include APA 6, AGPS Harvard, MLA, and Vancouver. Check out our Referencing styles page to find out more information, or find comprehensive style guides.

2. Identify the resource type

Is it a book? Is it a print book or an eBook? Is it the whole book, or just a chapter? Is it a journal article, web document or conference proceeding?

The resource type will dictate what details you will need to record. Check the referencing style guide to see what information you need to record for that resource type.

3. Collect information

Accurately record all the information about the resource you are referencing. You will need to note who created it, when was it created, what is it called and where was it published.

Be sure to consult your referencing style guide during this step. It will specify exactly what information you need.

4. Write your reference list

At this point, you will have your referencing style guide in front of you, and all the pertinent information about the resource you are referencing.

Now, it’s just a matter of putting the information together in the right order, with the right punctuation and capitalisation. Use the examples from your referencing guide to create a reference and in-text citation for your resource.

And, check out the referencing tool

For a quick snapshot of how to structure your reference, check out Griffith’s Referencing Tool. It combines the above steps so you can select your reference style, media type, and format, to be shown an example of how to reference your resource both in-text, and in your reference list.


UPDATE: Nathan workshops cancelled 21/2 due to weather conditions

  • Earlybird workshops update

Understanding Referencing and Get ready to research workshops scheduled  for today (21/2) at Nathan have been cancelled due to weather conditions. Additional workshops are available next week, see website for full workshop listing.