Are you following us on Instagram?

Griffith Library Instagram feed

We’ve seen some of you over on the @griffithlibrary Instagram, and we appreciate all your likes and comments. Fist bump to all our regulars!

But for those of you who aren’t familiar with our feed, maybe now’s the time to take a peek. You can see pics from our fabulous library events, like the recent weekend Hack-a-thon at the Gold Coast.

And it’s not just photos – we’ve dabbled with mini video content such as Boomerang and Instagram Stories. Check out the Boomerang of our massive Hack-a-thon cheque. Cool, right?

While we aim to keep you up-to-date with all the latest library resources and services, we also like to have a little fun on Insta. Okay, so maybe a lot of fun.

We keep you entertained with humorous, motivational or inspirational quotes, like the one we posted recently by Timothy Healy.

There’s also our semi-regular #bookfacefriday posts. Because who doesn’t enjoy seeing how creative some folk can be with their face, a book cover, and a mobile phone? Here’s one we posted a few days ago.

And as much as you’ll flip over the #bookfacefriday posts, you’ll love our behind-the-scenes snaps of our beloved library staff and lovely library spaces even more. Don’t you just dig this shot of one of our more colourful staff members?

Head over to Insta and scroll through the @griffithlibrary feed. If you like what you see, be sure to give us a Follow.


Check out our Library Twitter

Library Twitter

Us library staff like to think we’re a little hip (we’re not all cats and cups of tea, you know). And, even though we may not always be, our Twitter certainly is.

Yep, our Twitter. In case you didn’t already know, Griffith library is on Twitter. And most other major social media, too: FacebookInstagram, our wonderful blogs like this one.

Just like you use different social media for different things, so do we. While our library blog here is full of useful (and fun!) information which may go into a little more depth, our Twitter page is great for getting a quick snapshot of info. And it’s awash with funny gifs too!

So, if you’re a fellow Twitter user – come on over and follow us. Like us, retweet us, do all the twitter stuff! Or just follow our page quietly. Really, it’s your choice.  

And if you’re not a Twitter user, why not consider joining? It’s a great way to stay on top of information!


How to improve your study skills

Photo of study station

Study skills are essential to academic success.

But there are oh so many facets: critical thinking, time management, reading effectively, effective note taking, assignment preparation, assignment writing, referencing, exam preparation…

Wouldn’t it be great if there was a guide to all this? With strategies and resources designed to help you succeed in your studies?

Oh, lucky – there is!

The library’s study skills page is full of self-help resources to help you achieve academic success.

To start off, you can take an interactive tutorial on preparing for university, and learn to maximise your study time through tips on critical thinking, time management, reading effectively, and effective note taking.

Now we’re getting to the gritty end of the trimester, you might find our tutorials on preparing for your assignment and writing your assignment super handy. Trust us, good preparation and planning will make writing your assignment so much easier (give it a shot!).

We’ve also got tips to help you become a referencing guru. Almost all assessment pieces have dedicated marks for referencing, so it’s worth taking the time to get good at referencing.

And with the exam block looming, we recommend you take a look at our information on exam preparation to help you ace exams.

There are even tips on improving your social media skills. I know, you’re a millennial, what can we teach you that you don’t already know, right? But check it out, you might learn a thing a two. Like how to use social media to help land a job.


Hashtags for the researcher

Hashtags are the way topics and conversations are grouped on Twitter and other social networks. But they have a history longer than the digital age.

Keith Houston, in his blog Shady Characters, traced the hashtag back to the fourteenth century when medieval monk-scribes abbreviated the the Latin term libra pondo as ℔ (with a line through it). This eventually became the familiar # for convenience. From there the symbol took on a multitude of uses including coding in some early programming languages, labeling of IRC channels and as a button on 1960’s telephones.

According to research, Twitter is becoming an integral avenue for researchers to explore their disciplines, engage with each other and share their work. Check out these researcher themed hashtags on Twitter:

For further information on increasing your impact with the use of various social media, the library offers the HDR workshop “Build and leverage your research profile”. Discipline Librarians can also offer advice on the effective use of social media in connecting with other researchers.

Did you know that Griffith University will often include the #griffithlibrary when talking about our own research?


You’ve got a pending Friend Request

O-Week is all about making new friends that will last a uni-lifetime.

Friends who will be with you in the Library at 11pm the night before your dreaded stats exam; friends who will generously share their lecture notes when you’re sick the Tuesday after June long weekend; or friends who will buy you the double choc muffin you’re drooling over because they know your food (noodle) budget doesn’t include the $3.95 treat.

Just like these friends, Griffith Library will be there for you through your Uni journey. Whether you’re navigating your timetable, learning the referencing ropes or delving into the world of data research we’re here to help.

We promise we’ll be your best buddy offering news, resources, discounts, event info, competitions and training on our awesome Facebook, Twitter and Instagram pages. And if that isn’t enough for you, then subscribe to this Library blog for regular tips, tricks, study help, IT deals, competitions and more! 

All you need to do is Like and Follow Griffith Library and we’ll be BFFs in no time! #Justdoit.

To find friends that aren’t just online, check out Griffith Mates.

 


Welcome to Griffith

 If you’re new to Griffith – welcome!

Starting out at uni can be overwhelming with so much new information to learn and remember. But don’t worry we bet in just a few weeks you’ll be a uni-pro!

In the meantime, here is some essential Library info. After all you’ll probably be spending a considerable amount of time in the Library over the next few years, so best you two get acquainted.

 Our top tips

First things first, download the Griffith App and never get lost again. The App has a range of features including a map for each campus, your timetable, events, email and much more.

Logon to myGriffith. Your personalised student portal is a one-stop-shop for your timetables, course info, messages, events and of course great Library resources.

Head to an O-Week/Week1 Market Day and get acquainted with the Library Services at our Library stall – just look for the basketball ring. PLUS you’ll get the chance to kit-out your empty pantry or pencil case with heaps of free stuff and prizes to win!

Take a tour of your campus Library and discover where everything you need is located.

Head along to the Earlybird workshops to kick-start your uni journey with tips and tricks for navigating assignments, referencing, Griffith’s digital environment, exams and MORE. But don’t worry you can also access Library Workshops and Training all year round.

Tech out your uni experience. Visit the Student Computing website to find out about Lecture capture, software discounts, your email and Wi-Fi on campus.

Lastly, stay updated! Get all your Library and IT help by following us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and by subscribing to this amazing blog!


Social media for researchers

Social media has increasingly become the way that we connect in our personal, educational and business lives. In the past, collaboration and networking occurred at conferences, the workplace and through colleagues. However, the growth of internet use since the 1990’s has changed the landscape of collaboration and allowed researchers to establish connections and collaborative partnerships in locations they have never visited.

Twitter in particular has been used to generate ideas, collaborate with peers, seek opinions from other experts, gather public opinion, keep up with new developments in the field, promote publications, improve research metrics and connect with government, the press and policymakers.

Creating a profile on either ResearchGate or Academia.edu is another way to connect with other researchers, find out what they are doing and establish professional relationships that might prove fruitful.

LinkedIn is used as a professional platform to showcase a user’s skills and work history, and can be regarded as an online resume. It does have some social media aspects with a discussion feed from people a user follows, along with suggested connections in a researcher’s field or institution.

Dr Jodie Rummer, a fish ecologist from James Cook University, recently gave an informative presentation on choosing useful social media platforms and safely creating a professional digital identity. She successfully uses various forms of social media, such as Twitter, to connect with other researchers, the public or government bodies, and to help her with her teaching.

If you would like to know more about the use of social media as part of your researcher profile, please book a consultation with your Discipline Librarian.