Get a head start on study by attending our earlybird workshops

Quick quiz:

  • Are you starting uni this trimester?
  • Did you find last trimester’s study a challenge?
  • Do you want to further develop your learning skills?

If you answered yes to any of the above questions, our free Earlybird workshops are perfect for you!

During O Week for Trimester 2, 2018, we are offering the following Earlybird workshops free to Griffith students:

Writing university assignments

This workshop covers the basics of getting started, structuring and writing assignments.

Gold Coast: Wed 4 July, 9.30 am – G16 Lecture Theatre 1
Logan: Thurs 5 July, 9.30 am – L08 Lecture Theatre 2
Nathan: Thurs 5 July, 9.30 am – N18 Central Theatre 1

Getting started on an ePortfolio with PebblePad

Learn about Griffith’s personal learning environment – PebblePad. Don’t forget your login details and a device!

Gold Coast: Wed 4 July, 11.45 am – G16 Lecture Theatre 1
Logan: Thurs 5 July, 11.45 am – L08 Lecture Theatre 2
Nathan: Thurs 5 July, 11.45 am – N18 Central Theatre 1

Researching and referencing for your assignments

Gain awareness of the wide range of information resources available at Griffith and learn to identify the principles of referencing and the process of applying them within academic work.

Gold Coast: Wed 4 July, 1.30 pm – G16 Lecture Theatre 1
Logan: Thurs 5 July, 1.30 pm – L08 Lecture Theatre 2
Nathan: Thurs 5 July, 1.30 pm – N18 Central Theatre 1


Hone your post-grad research skills

Are you a postgraduate student or Higher Degree Research (HDR) candidate? Wondering how to get the skills to achieve at University? The Postgraduate Research Information Skills Modules are the resources you need!  

The online training modules will help you navigate your way through the research cycle. There are three sections: discover, manage and publish.  Each section will help you build your knowledge base and direct you to additional resources.

The Discover section is a ‘pre-flight check’ to help you focus on conducting independent research using Griffith University library resources. It will also teach you how to keep up-to-date in your field. You can get an overview on:

  • Research questions
  • How to find the literature you need
  • Authors and alerts
  • How to use the literature

Manage looks at best practices and tools for managing your information and research data. It includes tips on how to organise and manage your literature. Find sections on:

  • Organising your research
  • Research integrity
  • Managing research data
  • Being an author

Publish looks at networks and technologies to support collaboration with other researchers, find the best publishing outlets, measure research impact and discover opportunities for research funding. There’s info on:

  • How to get published
  • Collaborating
  • Scholarly impact
  • Obtaining funding

If you need further support, you can book a one-hour one-on-one session with a library specialist.  


Save time researching by using our library guides

Are you finding it hard to find the information you need for your assignment? Are you spending more time trying to research than Troy from Married at First Sight spends taking selfies?

Never fear! Our librarians are here to save you.

They have worked hard to compile all the databases and key information resources you’ll need for your subject area into one centralised area.

Simply visit our borrowing and resources library page and select your subject area under Library guides.

You can select a broad area, such as Health, to see all relevant databases. Or you can further narrow your selection to a specific discipline area, such as Nursing and Midwifery for more detailed information.

Using the resources in these subject guides can help ensure you’re finding information relevant to your specific subject area.

For example, if you wanted to find information on the chemistry of heavy metals, you’d take a squiz at the Chemistry guide. However, if you wanted to find information on the musical genre of heavy metal, you’d want to be looking at the Music guide.

For further help with researching, check out our Study Smart tutorial.


Your guide to the different types of sources when researching

When it comes to finding resources for university assignments, you need to consider how authoritative the source is. Basically, there are three types of sources based on level of authority: scholarly, peer reviewed, and non-scholarly.

It is your responsibility to find out which type of source to use for your assignment.

Scholarly sources

Scholarly sources are usually written by academics or researchers who are experts in their area of research.

These researchers have authority in their field and produce highly credible work. Their work is a more reliable source of information than non-scholarly sources.

The most common scholarly source is a journal article. A journal is like a scholarly magazine. It focuses on a particular subject area, contains articles written by academic experts, and is written for an audience of experts.

Some books can also be considered a scholarly resource. Books which are written by academic experts for an academic audience are likely to be scholarly sources.

Peer-reviewed sources

Peer-reviewed sources are one of the most reliable sources of information. Peer-reviewed journal articles, also known as refereed journal articles, go through a process of review by one or more experts in the field of study before publication.

How do you find peer reviewed sources? Well, if you are using the Griffith University Library Catalogue, you can select the Peer-Reviewed/Refereed materials checkbox in the Advanced Search.

You can also search Ulrich’s Web to check the journal’s status. It provides information about published journals, including status as a scholarly, academic journal.

Non-scholarly sources

Although scholarly and peer-reviewed sources are often the focus for university assignments, you still may need to use information from a non-academic author.

Non-scholarly sources include those not written for an academic audience, like newspaper articles, government reports, magazines and most web sites – including Wikipedia.

These sources can be a great place to find background information about a topic, but it is important to evaluate your sources so that you are using reliable and accurate information.


Where to start researching for your assignment

It’s about that time of trimester where you’re probably getting started (or have already started) on researching for your assignments. It may seem like a monumental task. Maybe the thought of starting is overwhelming you? We mean, where do you even start? (hint: it’s not Facebook. Close that tab.)

Master procrastinators, it’s time to listen up (and get started)! Below are some key places you can start your research:

1. Course Readings

Course readings are a great place to start when doing research for assignments. You can find your course Reading List in Learning@Griffith, in the Readings section of your course site. Reading Lists provide you with links to online resources (eBooks, journal articles, web pages), or to the Library catalogue, so you can find print resources.

2. Library catalogue

The Library catalogue is a great place to search for resources. From books, journal articles and videos to conference proceedings, newspaper articles and online documents, the Library catalogue has it all, and more!

It lets you search for a huge number of resources in one place – the search box on the library home page.

3. Databases

To find specialised information, you will need to use online search tools, like the Library databases.

You can search databases to find specialised resources, such as:

The library also has databases for different disciplines. So if you require information on a business, law, education, health, science or social science topic, there is a database for you.

Not sure which database to search for your discipline? Check out our handy library guides.

4. Google Scholar

Now, you’ve probably used Google to search for information before. Whether it was for academic, work or recreational purposes, we all know how helpful the search engine can be.

But did you know Google has an academic search engine? Google Scholar is a search engine which searches a wide variety of sources including academic online journals, conference papers, dissertations, technical reports and books.

You can even use Google Scholar to find academic resources at Griffith University. It’s as simple as changing a setting. Head to the About Google Scholar webpage to find out how.


Get a head start with our Earlybird workshops

Quick quiz:

  • Are you starting uni this trimester?
  • Did you find last trimester’s study a challenge?
  • Do you want to further develop your learning skills?

If you answered yes to any of the above questions, our Earlybird workshops are perfect for you!

Prior to Trimester 1, 2018, we are offering the following Earlybird workshops free to Griffith students:

Strategies for study at university

Get an overview of university culture and expectations, and learn some helpful strategies for managing your time and studying effectively. Beginning the trimester with a head start on study and time management will make a world of difference, we promise!

Getting started on an ePortfolio with PebblePad

Learn about Griffith’s personal learning environment – PebblePad.

Researching and Referencing for your assignments

Being able to research and reference is a kinda crucial part of uni. If this seems daunting, come along to this workshop. You’ll gain awareness of the wide range of information resources available at Griffith and learn to identify the principles of referencing and the process of applying them within academic work.

Check out the times, dates, and locations, come along to a workshop, and start trimester one prepared for success!


Where to store your research data

Thankfully it’s not on a floppy disk!

If you’re a research student, we’re sure you know oh-too-well the struggles of managing and storing your immense amounts of data.

And, while we’re super grateful it’s 2018, and we don’t have to store data on floppy disks like in 1998, or on physical paper like in 1968, it’s still an enormous task to manage.

Enter: Griffith’s Research Storage Service. It offers various digital storage services based on specific storage needs to all researchers and research students affiliated with the university.

The three storage services available include Research Space, Research Drive, and Research Vault. There’s even a nifty little questionnaire you can take, which tells you which service is best for you.

We tested it out, and we can tell you with certainty that it takes under one minute, and that our fictitious data is best suited to Research Space.

The service can help you store, share and synchronise the digital data generated during your research project.

Project data is stored securely on Griffith servers and you’ll get unlimited storage, can access the service anytime and anywhere, as well as share files easily with collaborators at Griffith, in Australia and overseas.

For more information on the various services, check out the FAQs for Research Drive, Research Space and Research Vault.