Crimes and Punishments: Criminally Good

Crimes and Punishments Lightning Talks was one highly successful caper!

Griffith Review and Griffith Library teamed up thick as thieves to present an engaging, educating and inspiring event.

Our criminology and justice experts, Professor Susan Dennison, Professor Ross Homel, Dr Sarah Woodland and Dr Lacey Schaefer, had the crowd on their edges of their seats.

Discussions included the ways we can better understand how crimes affect children, how we can do better for people who are incarcerated, and whether prison is even the best option for both the incarcerated and the general community.

Missed out on seeing it live? Don’t worry, it’s not a crime. Catch up on all the evidence via the Library Twitter, or watch the whole thing via our video stream.

A big thank you to our wonderful panel, our excellent MC Dr Ashley Hay, the audience members (especially those with the criminally good questions!) and the Griffith Review and Griffith Library team who made it all possible.

See you at the next one!


Lightning Talks: Crimes and Punishments

Exploring the darker side of human nature

Since the appropriation and settlement of Australia’s mainland to the present time, much has changed in our approach and attitudes to crimes and punishments. Most notably, it has been a shift from large-scale convict transportation, with its comprehensive system of colonial justice and punishment, to ideas of justice and retribution that include restorative justice, justice reinvestment and social-benefit bonds. Through a number of stories, retribution, reform and rehabilitation are themes explored in Griffith Review 65: Crimes and Punishments.

Also, these themes are often reflected in research – the impact of crime on family and community and, of the changing attitudes to criminology on reform and rehabilitation. The following snapshot of open access research, held in Griffith Research Online, forms part of the research narrative around the interconnection between crime and punishment and societal impact and attitudes:

Read more Griffith University research on crime and punishment.

Please join us at the Griffith Review and Griffith Library presentation of Lightning talks: Crimes and Punishments.

Featuring experts:

Prof Susan Dennison

Professor Susan Dennison is a professor and deputy head of school (Research) in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University as well as deputy director of the Griffith Criminology Institute.

Prof Ross Homel

Professor Ross Homel is Foundation Professor of the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University. His research is focused on preventing crime, violence and injuries, and promoting the positive development of children and young people living in crime disadvantaged communities.

Dr Sarah Woodland

Dr Sarah Woodland is a practitioner, researcher and educator in applied theatre, specialising in participatory arts and prison theatre. Currently she is a Research Fellow at Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre.

Dr Lacey Schaefer

Dr Lacey Schaefer is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University and a Research Fellow with the Griffith Criminology Institute. A 2017 study undertaken by Dr Schaefer in environmental corrections saw a 28% reduction in reoffending.

Date

  1. Wednesday 21 August 2019
    Noon – 1 pm

Location

  1. Mt Gravatt Library (M13) Level 2

Crimes and Punishments


📅Date: Wed, 21/08/19

⏰Time: Noon-1pm

🏠Place: M13 Mt. Gravatt Library (Level 2)

Griffith Review and Griffith Library bring you the Lightning Talks your true-crime loving heart has been waiting for.

Griffith Library has been bringing you Lighting Talks for over two years now. Never been to one and not sure what to expect? No worries! Lightning Talks are similar to Ted Talks, with our speakers giving their expert opinion on a topical subject in a short amount of time.

Lightning Talks: Crimes and Punishments takes the Griffith Review Edition 65 topics further to explore the complex nature of crime and justice.

Featuring an expert panel, we will also have time for questions, so come along and enjoy!

Featuring:

Professor Susan Dennison is Professor and Deputy Head of School (Research) in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University as well as Deputy Director of the Griffith Criminology Institute.

Professor Ross Homel is Foundation Professor of the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University. His research is focused on preventing crime, violence and injuries, and promoting the positive development of children and young people living in crime disadvantaged communities.

Dr Sarah Woodland is a practitioner, researcher and educator in applied theatre, specializing in participatory arts and prison theatre. Currently she is a Research Fellow at Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre.

Dr Lacey Schaefer is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University and a Research Fellow with the Griffith Criminology Institute. A 2017 study undertaken by Dr. Lacey Schaefer in environmental corrections saw a 28% reduction in reoffending.

Stay tuned on Facebook as we bring you more information on these incredible speakers.

#GriffithReview #GriffithLibrary #LightningTalks


Crimes and Punishments: Lightning Talk

What is it about crime stories that has us so compelled? From true crime podcasts to Netflix bingeing on tales of the allegedly wrongfully convicted, we get hooked.

Behind every true crime narrative are real people; the victims, witnesses, the advocates, the practitioners. Every crime is a story and just conclusions are often elusive.

Griffith Review and Griffith Library are teaming up to present Lightning Talks: Crimes and Punishments to support the publication of Griffith Review 65 – Crimes and Punishments. This Lightning talks events will explore the complex and fascinating question of why justice can wear so many guises and how crimes and punishments affect the every day.

Prof Susan Dennison

Professor Susan Dennison is a professor and deputy head of school (Research) in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University as well as deputy director of the Griffith Criminology Institute.

Prof Ross Homel

Professor Ross Homel is Foundation Professor of the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University. His research is focused on preventing crime, violence and injuries, and promoting the positive development of children and young people living in crime disadvantaged communities.

Dr Sarah Woodland

Dr Sarah Woodland is a practitioner, researcher and educator in applied theatre, specialising in participatory arts and prison theatre. Currently she is a Research Fellow at Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre.

Dr Lacey Schaefer

Dr Lacey Schaefer is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University and a Research Fellow with the Griffith Criminology Institute. A 2017 study undertaken by Dr. Lacey Schaefer in environmental corrections saw a 28% reduction in reoffending.

Date:

Wednesday 21 August 2019
Noon – 1 pm

Where:

Mt Gravatt Library (M13) Level 2