Stop and smell the forest – part 3: Fauna presence

Facebook. Youtube. Google Calendar. Gmail. These information platforms may have most of your attention as you make your way to work, study, or even to have a coffee after arriving at either Nathan or Mount Gravatt campus.

But take a moment to look around – the forest that envelops Mount Gravatt and Nathan campuses, Toohey Forest, is home to diverse native fauna.

Around 80 species of birds (including owls, cuckoos and drongos), 20 species of lizard, 11 types of snake and 40 species of butterfly can be found in the surrounding forest of both campuses.

The bushland is also home to koalas, wallabies, possums, gliders (possums), native bush rats, bandicoots and flying foxes.

Echidnas are still prevalent in the area with these unique animals most likely to be seen in the forest around Mount Gravatt campus.

These green areas are also home to the native Blue-banded bee which lives in a solitary burrow in the soil rather than in a ‘traditional’ bee hive or nest.

Mimosa Creek, which runs through Nathan campus, is home to a variety of frog species. Some small native fish species can also be spotted in this waterway for those with a keen eye.

So next time you are making your way around Nathan or Mount Gravatt campus – maybe look up from your device. Forget for a moment all the things you have to do in your day. If you do you might just see something remarkable like this, which was captured a couple of years ago by a Griffith student at Nathan campus.

Check out the Griffith Archive website for more interesting information on Griffith and it’s history


Stop and smell the forest – part 2: Flora presence

Photo of Grass Trees

Facebook. Youtube. Google Calendar. Gmail. These information platforms may have most of your attention as you make your way to work, study, or even to have a coffee after arriving at either Nathan or Mount Gravatt campus.

But take a moment to look around – the forest that envelops Mount Gravatt and Nathan campuses, Toohey Forest, is home to diverse native flora.

Both campus sites are about 100 metres above sea level. Studies of the rock strata under Nathan campus suggests there are mineral deposits that date back at least 350 million years.

The soil around both sites is generally thin and unable to hold water due to the large amounts of rock being present. While the soil quality is generally poor (except a few places across both campuses) you can see that plant life not only survives in this bushland – it actually thrives.

At least fifteen species of eucalypts are native to the area and visitors to either campus may notice the abundance of grasstrees on show. Slow growing (about 8mm a year) – grasstrees are amongst the hardiest of all Australian native flora. If you come across one around either campus that is two metres tall or more, then it is most likely this plant started growing over 200 years ago.

There is an abundance of native plants on campus, and in the surrounding forest. Check out the GrowsAtGriffith App for more information on these plants.

So next time you are making your way around Nathan or Mount Gravatt campus – look up from your device (unless, of course, you have GrowsAtGriffith open), and take a moment to stop and smell the forest.

Check out the Griffith Archive website for more interesting information on Griffith and it’s history.


Stop and smell the forest – part 1: Indigenous presence

Facebook. Youtube. Google Calendar. Gmail. These information platforms may have most of your attention as you make your way to work, study, or even to have a coffee after arriving at either Nathan or Mount Gravatt campus.

But take a moment to look around – the forest that envelops Mount Gravatt and Nathan campuses, Toohey Forest, has a rich history. 

The natural area that encircles the bricks and mortar of both campuses was and is an important land area to a number of Aboriginal language/tribal groups.

In the past, the bushland around our first two campuses provided aboriginal tribes with timber from Stringybark trees (which can be found around the Eastern car park and Nathan student residences) – used to make canoes and huts. Wood from Ironbark trees (which are predominant along the northern part of Nathan’s Ring Road) were used by Aborigines to make weapons and as long-burning firewood.  

Mount Gravatt mountain (or Kaggur Madul in Indigenous Yugara dialect which means ‘echidna mountain’) is about 500 metres from the actual campus buildings and this area was once abundant in echidnas (spiny anteaters) which were used by First Australians as both a food source and for needles (the sharp quills) in sewing cloaks and other forms of clothing.

The Toohey Forest area was not just used by indigenous people for resources. The land was also extremely important for use in ceremonies and social interactions.

A twenty minute walk from Nathan campus through the bush (on the border with the suburb of Tarragindi) is the site of a Bora Ring where initiation ceremonies for Aboriginal boys were performed. This ‘rite of passage’ would see indigenous lads taught traditional songs, dances and the lore of their respective tribe.

The land around Mount Gravatt campus is believed to have been used in the past for Indigenous burial/funeral ceremonies. This included such practices as placing a deceased person in a tree hollow or placing selected bone from dead individuals into rock crevices, in caves or on cliffs.

Not only does Toohey Forest have a rich Indigenous presence, it is also rich in natural flora and fauna. Keep an eye out for Stop and Smell the Forest Parts 2 and 3 on these! Or check out the Griffith Archive website for more interesting information like this.

So next time you are making your way around Nathan or Mount Gravatt campus – look up from your device, and take a moment to stop and smell the forest.


Mt Gravatt campus library closure

Photo of Mt Gravatt campus

Mt Gravatt campus library will be closed this Saturday 29 April for essential maintenance. But good news! All other Griffith University campus libraries will maintain their regular opening hours.

Come and visit the Nathan campus library – it’s really close! You can visit the desk for library and IT assistance over the weekend, or simply use our range of study spaces. And remember, you can also contact us by phone, email or chat.

If you are keen to use a computer lab at the Mt Gravatt campus, the Psychology (M24) lab is open 24 hours. Check lab computer availability here.

Mt Gravatt campus library will reopen Sunday 30 April at 12pm.


Mt Gravatt campus library closure

Photo of Mt Gravatt campus

UPDATE: Good news, the Library will be remain open! We’ve managed to resolve the issues and Mt Gravatt library will remain open as usual. See you there. 

 

Mt Gravatt campus library will be closed the weekend 22-23 April 2017. But good news! All other Griffith University campus libraries will maintain their regular opening hours.

Come and visit the Nathan campus library – it’s really close! You can visit the desk for library and IT assistance over the weekend, or simply use our range of study spaces. And remember, you can also contact us by phone, email or chat.

If you are keen to use a computer lab at the Mt Gravatt campus, the Psychology (M24) lab is open 24 hours. Check lab computer availability here

Mt Gravatt campus library will reopen Monday 24 April at 8am.


Science Day out!

Over the past year, Mt Gravatt Library’s favourite school kids have been regularly visiting to read books and learn more about ‘big school’.

Each month, the school kids from Yarranlea Primary School take a short walk to Griffith Library for storytime and activities with the librarians.

But this month it was the primary school’s turn to host the librarians. Griffith received a special invitation to attend the school’s annual science day.

During the morning the kids became mini Einsteins enjoying a variety of different science activities and experiments. Not surprisingly, the homemade sherbet was the favourite!

Our librarians took along some acid (Coca-Cola), zinc and copper to make a homemade battery – after all you need power and light to see when you read books!

The Yarranlea Primary school shares the campus grounds with our Mt Gravatt Library and is only a short walk up the hill from the children’s classroom.

The the library has been opening its doors (and books) to the students since the community initiative began last year. The monthly visits incorporate engaging stories with fun and educational activities all run by Griffith’s Library staff.


Arrr it’s storytime at Mt Gravatt

Our Mt Gravatt library staff said ahoy! to the Yarranlea Primary School kids today with a pirate-themed storytime. The morning featured The man whose mother was a pirate by Margaret Mahy and some good ol’ fashion Vitamin C to ward off any chance of scurvy.

The Yarranlea Primary school shares the campus grounds with our Mt Gravatt Library and is only a short walk up the hill from the children’s classroom.

The the library has been opening its doors (and books) to the students since the community initiative began last year. The monthly visits incorporate engaging stories with fun and educational activities all run by Griffith’s Library staff.

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We can’t wait to see what fun is planned for Children’s Book Week and Science Week later on in the year!

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