How to stay on top of your course readings

We’re coming up to week 9 already, and if you already don’t know about course readings, here is your chance to learn all you need to know!

It’s crucial to stay on top of your readings when they’re assigned, and we are here to help make sure they’re all in one easily accessible location. It’s super easy, so no excuses!

Just head over to Learning@Griffith and click on your desired course; you will find a Readings link on the left-hand menu. From here you’ll go to the readings you’ve been assigned and the links which will take you directly to them.

If your assigned reading is an online resource, you will see the View Online button. All you need to do is click on the button and it’ll take you directly to the resource you need. eBook, website, video – you’ll be ready to read or watch.

If it’s not an online resource, don’t stress, you should be able to find it in our library! Just click on the resource title to expand and see the availability and location of the book in our libraries.

You can even personalise your Reading Lists by assigning a read status to resources such as will read, reading now, have read, and won’t read (although we know you won’t be using that one!). You can also add handy little study notes.

If you want to know more, check out our FAQs for Reading Lists.


Human Library a success!

Did you ‘borrow’ a human book?

As we celebrated Harmony Week across the University, we held our annual Human Library on March 20. This event provided an opportunity to converse with someone about their lives, what makes them who they are, and most importantly, creates a safe place for open communication and ideas. The Human Library hopes to break down barriers, challenge beliefs and create a more tolerant society.

This year we had 14 wonderful human ‘books’, brave enough to share their stories with our readers. The books on offer included Sexually Abused Child, Lesbian Priest, Alcoholic, Prisoner of War, Jewish, along with representatives of our First People and many more. The Readers and Books asked questions and listened, in turn recognising the Human Book is not just a label, but they also had a story to tell.

Head over to our YouTube channel and take a look at the final product that raps up the day perfectly.

 

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Borrow a human book

 

What happens when you get a group of people together in one room sharing their life stories, confronting social stigma and challenging prejudice? Magic!

Immerse yourself in a bestseller of a different kind at our Human Library.

On Wednesday 20 March 2019, we are flipping the Nathan campus library on its head and offering you the chance to borrow a person, instead of a book!

We’ve gathered together a group of storytellers keen to share their experience with social stigma, prejudice and discrimination in the hope to break down barriers, challenge beliefs and create a more tolerant society.

In our Human Library, you can borrow a human book on a certain topic and sit down with them for an honest and open 20 minute chat about their life experiences and the issues they have faced.

What kind of books can you borrow at our Human Library?

Want to borrow a human book? Want to be involved in this unforgettable experience? Register as a reader in our Human Library. There are limited sessions available in this two-hour event, so get in quick!

Book: Julie and Tara

Title: Cancer Vol 1&2

Story: We don’t refer to ourselves as “survivors”, as for us, the train we hopped on had to make it to the station where we could both hope off to a “new normal”. We both live with the guilt of seeing friends hop on the train, but the journey ended so differently. Our stories are similar in so many ways, but our journeys to our new normal were dramatically different. We are two friends, both diagnosed with breast cancer at the same age. Both adopted, so we had no idea if breast cancer was in our families. What we do know is cancer can also bring positive outcomes and the bond we now have is one of them.

Register for this book

Book: Uncle Bob

Title: Hidden Generation

Story: I was born to an Aboriginal father and a non-Aboriginal mother who separated when I was about three. It was the time of the stolen generation, when indigenous children were being taken from their families by government agencies. To avoid being identified as an Aboriginal, I was raised with my mother and white brothers along with grandparents, uncles, aunties and cousins.
I was never allowed contact with my Aboriginal relatives for fear I would be taken away. I was denied any access to my culture or my father’s family. I left home around sixteen to make my own way as a young man, which is what all of my instincts told me to do. It was much to the disapproval of my family and I have had no understanding from them or close ties with them ever since.
It wasn’t until most of my mother’s family had passed away that my aunty confirmed that my father was an Aboriginal. She could not remember where his family came from so to trace them has been a nightmare. The search for more information and understanding of my culture is ongoing. I put a lot of time into community work, but I still struggle to understand why I have the feelings I do and why am I who I am, and I am still coming to grips with my spiritual self. This is a legacy of being one of the hidden generation, at least the stolen generation know who they are and where they are from, they haven’t lived in this cultural void I call no mans land.

Register for this book

Book: Gemma

Title: Obesity

Story: I struggled with my weight since the age of 22. At a hight of 5’6 and weighing over 142kg I had tried everything to lose weight. I was so obese that I needed a walking stick to get around. When my doctor told me I would be dead in 10 years, I made a decision that would change my life. Aged 34 (at the time) and a mother of 2 children, I was not ready to die so young. My doctor suggested Gastric Sleeve Surgery, where 80% of the stomach is removed to reduce portion of food intake. I agreed on the spot, and started shopping around for a good surgeon. Less than 6 months later, I was on the operating table. That was in October 2017, and I have lost over 50kg and only have 20kg left to reach my goal. Most of my weight fell off me within the first 9 months after surgery, and I said good bye to my walking stick only 2 months after. It was the best decision of my life. I love my sleeve!

Register for this book

Book: Donald

Title: Sexually Abused Child

Story: On a warm November afternoon in 1988, I was sitting next to my mother on a chartered bus from the Gold Coast to Brisbane. We were on a trip to see Whitney Houston in concert. I was sipping on my second glass of champagne, my second, ever. We were happily chatting, yet during the course of this conversation I blithely told Mum that I had been repeatedly sexually abused by John- when we lived in Mildred Street. I was 15 when I told Mum. I had lived with that secret for more than half my life. I saw my mother’s face crumple. It was heartbreaking. Despite all that I knew, this was the worst moment of my life… until then. That’s what abuse does. I may have learnt at an early age about depravity- but with that an ever-present sense of fortitude and compassion. And that’s what forgiveness does.

Register for this book

Book: Aunty Heather

Title: Female Elder

Story: I am a proud Kamilaroi-Kooma (Aboriginal) woman. I believe in bridging the gap and understanding with Reconciliation in my heart and growing as equals together as one. I believe that we need to develop an understanding of all cultures that make up the island we call our country of Australia, that we love and want to share with the world. As a younger person, I worked for 27 years in the outback on cattle and sheep stations, shearing sheds and earth moving camps. Today, I am Acting Aboriginal Co-Chair of Reconciliation Queensland Inc. and sit on the Board of Murrigunyah (Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islanders Corporation for Women). I am Director of DV Connect (Domestic Violence service QLD) and work as an Aboriginal Elder running Cultural Workshops. For the past 14 years, I have worked as an Indigenous Cultural Consultant for Queensland Health in Child & Youth Mental Health Service.

Register for this book

Book: Susan

Title: First in Family

Story: I’m a country girl from remote NSW, turned international lawyer on the world’s stage. I was the first in my family to attend University and started my law degree with no contacts, no clue whatsoever about what a University degree entailed, but with high hopes about what my future could hold. Now I’m a proud International Lawyer and advocate for human, womens and refugee rights. Trying to move mountains and create good.

Register for this book

Book: Ari

Title: Jewish

Story: I am an Australian Jew who works as a Jewish Community Worker. I am passionate about Interfaith and demonstrating how my religion with ancient roots has a modern role in society. I am a survivor of childhood sexual abuse and have been through the path of self destructive behaviors and now facilitate at a men’s group MARS (Men Affected by Rape and Sexual Abuse) to help other men through the healing recovery process. I believe communication is the key to bringing down barriers.

Register for this book

Book: Chrissie

Title: Girl in a van

Story: I packed up my cosy apartment life, sold all my belongings and moved into a van, all the while staying in my home city and continuing my full-time job. It’s been two years now, and I’ve moved on to a roomier box truck, which I’m slowly converting into a functional tiny home whilst living inside. It’s still raw and has only a few amenities, but I’ve added some girly touches and it feels like home. I sleep in a different location most nights and spend the weekends road-tripping or staying at beaches and forests. I realise I can’t do this forever in the one town, so I’m saving and building and one day I’ll be able to quit the job and travel the country.

Register for this book

Book: Uncle John

Title: Aboriginal

Story: I am a Senior Learning Assistance Officer in the GUMURRII unit on Griffith’s Nathan Campus. I am a traditional custodian of the Gold Coast region, a Kombumerri man, a saltwater man of the Gold Coast part of the wider Yugumbeh Language Group. The Yugumbeh lands are located between the Logan River in the north and the Tweed River in the south. They are bordered by the mountains to the west and the ocean to the east. I am also a Griffith Business School graduate, Alumni and long-term employee (18 years) of Griffith University. I am a member of the Griffith Council of Elders and have the privilege of being acknowledged as an Elder on the Yugumbeh Elders Group.

Register for this book

Book: Jazmina

Title: Ex-muslim

Story: I’ve been on both sides – from Hijab-wearing devout Muslim to an unveiled ex-Muslim atheist. I left Islam after feeling a disconnection between my world views and the Islamic teachings, especially on matters regarding gender roles, the LGBTQI community and capital punishment. It’s a scary position to be in because some Muslims believe that apostates should be killed. Often, Muslims who wish to leave the religion never manage to do so out of fear of receiving death threats and being excommunicated from their communities. It is for the same reasons that I have not told my family and I continue to lead a double life when they visit me. If I have the chance to speak to people, I would share my story of me exercising my human right to non-religious freedom, and I would make a clear distinction between disagreeing with Islam and Islamophobia.  

Register for this book

Book: Narelle

Title: Lesbian Catholic Priest

Story: I was ordained in 2010 as the first female Catholic Priest in Australia. I am a lesbian, foster mother, activist and passionate permaculturist and committed to providing a safe, welcoming and accepting church community for people to find comfort, inclusion and reflection. After suffering a major stroke in 2003 I dramatically changed my career paths. From the Chief Executive Officer of the statewide non-government organisation to a disability pension, I refocused my life direction, moving from a career in social work to theology. I learnt the value of good friends, fell in love and opened my heart and garden to build community. I could not be happier with my life. I love sharing my story of recovery, gardening and finding the spiritually of life on the way.

Register for this book

Book: Reena

Title: Multicultural Advocate

Story: I grew up in a small city in India and came to Australia as a student. My dream has always been to unite people from all walks of life, to remove racial barriers and replace them with a sense of belonging. I made my dream come true by organising multicultural fashion shows that challenge the stereotypes of beauty and fashion through celebrating all men and women, no matter what cultural background, shape or size. I believe beauty is in the spirit which shines through in your eyes, in your laughter and through your happiness. Diversity and acceptance is the culture we should follow and I am proud to be a platform that says no to pre-existing stereotypes of the fashion industry as we lead the way to a more inclusive future all the while promoting multiculturalism.

Register for this book

Book: Yaseen

Title: Muslim Male, Prisoner of War and Sufferer of PTSD

Story: As a 22-year-old international student, I didn’t know what September 11 really meant for Muslims until I was taken away from my hostel and locked behind bars. Nine months in a window-less cell, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, the worst was yet to come. I was treated as a soldier of the unknown enemy, who had the capability to strike but didn’t have the motive (yet). But like every story, there was a happy ending.

Register for this book

Book: Dean

Title: Urban Farmer

Story: I deeply believe that becoming more sustainable is simple, easy and achievable for everyone. We need to seriously start being more green in our homes and communities now, because everything we do has an effect on the Earth. I am an urban farmer, permaculturist and gut health guru. Originally from a rural farming background, I now strongly focus on urban farming – bringing food growing back into the towns and cities, where it has traditionally always been in sustainable cultures. I run several related local, national and international groups and projects to support homes and communities in sustainable living. Join the green revolution!

Register for this book

Book: Richo and Maggie

Title: Veteran and Assistance Dog

Story: A former Army Apprentice and member of the Royal Australian Engineers, I returned to university in my late 40s after a serious spinal cord injury. The study challenges ahead became overwhelming, until I was introduced to the Australian Student Veterans Association (ASVA). Today with the support of Maggie (Chief Happiness Officer / assistance dog), I am achieving great results in both undergraduate and postgraduate studies.

Register for this book

Book: Anne

Title: Alcoholic

Story: I lost two children, and then I lost myself. It was a long journey through pain and shame to discover who I really was. I have discovered that escaping our feelings only brings more problems, sometimes facing the pain and feeling it, can lead to enlightenment. With the help of the AA program I gained an honest understanding of what it is to be a human being, accepting our imperfections and embracing joy and suffering as the whole of life’s experience.

Register for this book

 

 


Get to know your library with a tour this O-Week!

New recruits! Welcome to O-Week!

O-Week starts Monday and Trimester 1 kicks off the next week, and our friendly library staff are here to enlighten you on all the wonders to behold in our libraries.

Griffith University libraries are so much more than books on a shelf. They’re full to the brim with resources to help you settle into uni life and succeed in your academic journey. From bookable group study spaces, quiet study areas, computers, laptop loans, printers, wireless and so much more, our libraries have you covered! Here in the library we also understand the stress uni life brings, and our comfy lounges and bean bags are here to help you unwind.

During O-Week, 18 to 22 February, 15-minute tours are being run by our helpful library staff, so why not pop by for tour and get to know your local campus library a bit better!

Additionally, why not check out our website, take a look at our Study Smart tutorials, and learn about borrowing and library resources.

See below for the tour deets, we hope to see you there!

Library Campus Location Time Frequency
Gold Coast Graham Jones Building (G10) 10.30 am – 1.30 pm Every half-hour, on the hour and half hour
Logan Wayne Goss Centre (L03) 12 noon – 2 pm As required
Mt Gravatt Information Services Centre (M13) 12 noon – 2 pm As required
Nathan Willett Centre (N53) 10 am – 2 pm Every half-hour, on the hour and half hour
South Bank Conservatorium (S01 1.23) &
College of Art (S03)
12 noon – 2 pm As required

Keep your valuables safe on campus

Swiper no swiping!

 

You wouldn’t leave your wallet in an unlocked car. Or leave your front door unlocked while going out of the house for the whole day. Leaving your possessions unattended in the library is exactly the same!

We understand that you’re falling asleep at 3pm and need to quickly run to get a coffee but can’t lose your prime spot next to the window in the big comfy chair. But while most of the time your bag won’t be swiped (we like to think we don’t have thieves on campus!), it’s better to be safe than sorry.

So, how can you prevent your stuff being stolen?

  • Never leave your valuable items unattended

If you need to take a break or grab some study snacks, always get a friend to watch your valuables or take them with you. Lugging those heavy textbooks around with you is better than having your whole bag stolen!

  • Ensure your personal computer is secure

Is your whole student-life on your computer? Take steps to ensure you are safe online; we don’t want you losing all that work! Protect your passwordsbackup your work and install an antivirus program.

  • If you’re using a Griffith computer, log out before you turn off

Logging out before turning the computer off removes the risk that the next user of that computer will have access to your account. The computer can also apply any patches to potentially block any holes that hackers may use to try and gain access.

Head over to the security web page for any extra info and tips!

If you notice any suspicious behaviour, don’t be afraid to give your campus security team a call:

  • Nathan & Mt Gravatt: 3735 7777
  • South Bank: 3735 6226
  • Logan: 3382 1717
  • Gold Coast: 5552 7777

4 reasons to visit the library this Summer

What better place to be than at the library this Summer? Let us convince you why…

1. Escape the heat

Want to chill out (literally) this season without breaking the bank? Well…the library has you covered! If Griffith library isn’t currently your favourite place (and why wouldn’t it be?), it sure is about to be, especially during these warmer months. Our air conditioning (which by the way, you’re not paying for unlike that one at home!) teamed with our comfy chill out spots, is hands down the perfect summer combo.

2. WiFi and computers

Okay, well while we’re on the topic of free stuff…did someone say WiFi? Borrow a laptop from the library for free, or bring your own device and get connectedCommon-use computers are also available in the library. Perfect to use to download your lecture notes from Learning@Griffith, or to catch up on social media.

3. Study and chill out spaces

Whether you’re a silent studier, a quiet studier, a social studier or literally just want to sit here and enjoy the atmosphere, the library has dedicated areas for all of you. Once entering those main doors into the heavenly, air-conditioned world with countless study spaces which we call the library, working at home is just not going to cut it. Don’t forget to book your group space, just in case!

4. Escape the crowds

Summer. Crazy Christmas crowds, traffics jams and busy beaches. Stress o’metre? High! The library is the perfect place to escape the hustle and bustle and relax. We have plenty of books and magazines on offer for your entertainment. Plus, you’ll be saving money – bonus! Check out our hours, we’re basically open every day!


Library-themed Christmas decorations

That time of the year is getting awfully close!

Crowds at your local Westfield are getting intense, Mariah Carey’s All I want for Christmas is you is being overplayed, decorations are going up…

Now, if you need a little #DecorationInspo, we’re here to help! Check out our library-themed Christmas decoration suggestions below:

Christmas tree made of books

Is your Christmas tree starting to look a little worse for wear? We’ve got the perfect suggestion! Create one out of books. Take a look at these pages for instructions:

Or maybe you fancy crafting your own book Christmas tree ornaments? Try these!

Book snowman or reindeer

While we’re making decorations out of books, why not craft a snowman or reindeer while you’re at it? Have a look at this for inspo!

Book advent calendar

Chocolate is so last year. Take a look at this super cute book advent calendar idea.

Ornaments

Want something a little more subtle? Follow these instructions to make:

Psst: want to know where to find the best library-themed Christmas decorations? In our libraries, of course.

While they always decorate in style, we hear this year they’ve got something special planned: each campus library is creating Christmas decorations for another campus to display!