Four reasons to visit the library this Summer

It’s the first day of summer!

Whether you’re blasting the aircon to escape the heat, or headed for the beach to enjoy the heat, we’re guessing heading to the library probably isn’t quite at the top of your ‘things to do this summer’ list.

That said, we totally think the library should be on it. Hear us out. There are some pretty cool perks here, including:

We have aircon

We were once students too. Council pickup and mi goreng were our friends. Energy bills were not. If you’re living in an run down (a-hem, quaint) share house without aircon, or simply don’t want to foot that exxy electricity bill, come to us instead. Relax in a cool environment – both literally and figuratively!

And magazines too

We’ve told you about PressReader before, but we’re gonna remind you. PressReader provides access to a range of newspapers and magazines, such as Cosmopolitan, Games Master, Reader’s Digest, Vogue, The Guardian, GQ, and many more!  So sit back in the aircon, relax, and read a ‘zine (do people still call them that?).

Get on the net

We have computers, laptops and Wi-Fi. Oh my! Common-use computers are available in the library. Or if you prefer to recline in a beanbag with a laptop or mobile device, you can do that too. Borrow a laptop from the library for free, or bring your own device and connect to the university Wi-Fi.

Utilise our study spaces

Maybe you’re committed and studying this Trimester 3. If so, we have a range of study spaces you can utilise, including silent, quiet, social and bookable group study spaces. Get in the zone and focus. Food and retail stores are still open on campus, so you’ll be able to get coffee to fuel you!


How far have we come in supporting LGBTIQA+ youth?

Griffith Library and ALLY Network join together!

Media has made scare tactics an artform with the marriage equality postal survey – from both sides!  Griffith Library and the ALLY Network present: Moral panic, media mayhem, and safety for our LGBTIQA+ youth: how far have we really come?

We have seen an increase in mainstream media representations of gender fluidity and sexual diversity.  Television such as the return of Will & Grace; a gay couple portrayed as a ‘heteronormative’ lifestyle in Modern Family; as well as transgender actress Laverne Cox on the cover of Time magazine.  Add to this, Caitlin Jenner sharing the journey of her transition, we can’t help but think times are changing.

But how far have we really come?

Our panel will discuss subjects such as moral panic, bullying, Safe Schools, and cultural change.

When
Tuesday 17 October 2017  |  noon – 1:00pm

Where
QCA Lecture Theatre (S05), Room 2.04, South Bank campus

RSVP
Registration is essential and will close on Monday 16 October 2017


Lightning Talks is Real Speak

For those of you who weren’t among the sixty plus audience members at last week’s Lightning Talks in the Nathan Campus library – have no fear, we’ve got you covered!

So what are Lightning Talks?
Lightning Talks are similar to soapbox events or Speakers’ Corner in Hyde Park, London, where speakers give voice to a variety of topical issues and invite discussion on current affairs.

Our academics and professional experts are invited to talk for 10 minutes to talk about their work in relation to a theme, and then the audience is invited to ask questions.

Why do we hold these talks?

We are hoping to make research and ideas more accessible, removing the stigma of ‘ivory towers’, breaking down hierarchical divisions. Lightning Talks are an extension of Griffith University’s commitment to inclusivity, and bringing disciplines together.

Our speakers for #LightningTalks3 were:

Associate Professor Georgina Murray who kicked off the talks with her discussion centring on socio-political changes occurring in the world, and the effects of neoliberal political ideology, particularly around employment. She highlighted some shocking statistics about the casualisation of the Australian labour force with some of the societal ramifications being drug addiction, financial insecurity around obtaining home loans, and a lack of sick leave. So do companies like Uber break up monopolies of power or do they further contribute to marginalisation and disenfranchisement in our turbulent times?

Dr Duncan McDonnell discussed the rise of right-wing populism internationally and compared Australia’s One Nation with the more successful right-wing populists in Western Europe. He highlighted that right-wing populism is not historically new; we just rename it to go with the current time period. And whilst Donald Trump does not conform to the populist leader ideal; it must be acknowledged how his controversial nature got him elected once, and he can be again! Across the Atlantic, populist parties in Europe do well because unlike their mainstream counterparts, they focus on grassroots community engagement.

Dr Susanna Chamberlain started with asking the question, ‘What the heck is populism?’ and then led us on a journey that linked anthropology and history to binaries around populism. Populism, it appears, is about the leader’s’ ability to identify as the ‘common person’ aka ‘we are just like you’ ideal; however, that idea is often a misnomer as one might suspect with Donald Trump’s empire building — funded by a ‘small’ loan of a million dollars from his father– that hardly mirrors the average ‘common person’s’ start in life.

Mr John Tague, Griffith Review Managing Editor, brought his experience and knowledge as an international journalist to discuss changes in journalistic reporting and political writing. Griffith Review, a compilation of long form essays, engages its audience and reinvigorates the idea that not everything can – or should – be conveyed in 140 character Tweets. Brexit, Trump and right-wing European leaders regularly take to the mediasphere, often invoking moral panic by circulating narratives about alleged racial tensions, scientific knowledges, and rise of ‘fake news’ in the post- truth politics era.

For the full story, listen here.

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Using stats and need some last minute help… STAT?

Do you need to analyse stats in your classes this semester? SAGE can help get you over the line with that final assignment or upcoming exam.
With exams just around the corner, you may need all the help you can get (because of course you pre-planned your whole semester and don’t need any extra help… right?).

Even if you’re not currently studying stats, but statistical analysis really floats your boat (no judgement from us), this is a great tool to help you further develop your skills.

SAGE Research Methods Datasets is a collection of datasets to support independent learning of data analysis skills. They are particularly useful for practicing quantitative and qualitative analytical methods used in the social sciences.

The datasets are obtained from real research projects, but edited and cleaned for teaching purposes and usability.

Each dataset is accompanied by a short and clear description of the data, and easy to follow instructions on how to apply the research method.

SAGE also has a range of accompanying tools to support the use of these datasets. Some particularly helpful tools are:

  • Methods Map: you can explore the research methods terrain, read definitions of key terminology, and discover content relevant to your research methods journey.
  • Project Planner: this tool helps you plan out and progress through the stages of your research project. When you click on the link to the stage you are at it will give you a breakdown of the components of the stage, with links to further readings.
  • Which Stats Test: this tool helps you to narrow down the range of options for statistical testing though answering a series of questions, and help you decide on the most pertinent test for to use for your project.

Take a look at the SAGE Research Methods website for further tools and information


The lowdown on library lending

Pile of books

Did you know that Abibliophobia is the fear of running out of reading material?

More importantly, did you know that students have unlimited library borrowing? That’s right, we will let you walk out the door with all the books you can carry…as long as you borrow them first! No Abibliophobia here!

For postgraduate students the lending period is 6 months. Undergraduates get a slightly less epic 60 days. 1 loan renewal is available to all students.

The only time your due date changes is if someone else wants the book you’ve got. When a hold is placed on a book in your possession, you will receive an email asking you to return it within two weeks. In this case, be kind and return the book asap to the nearest library. Then when you place a hold on a book someone else has, karma will totally have your back and that person will return your desired book asap. It’s the circle of library life.

If you need any more information, or want some help finding the books you need, check out our borrowing information or come and see our friendly library staff. We’ll help you find all the books you can reasonably carry*.

*BYO sturdy bag or army of minions to help get them home safe.


Hack-a-thon, a success!

Our first Hack-a-thon was an awesome success!

A huge congrats to all participants who worked their behinds off and pumped out some amazing work!

The event kicked off with guest speaker, Daniel Ngo from Entrepreneur Haus (check out Daniel’s speech on Facebook). The students were given a short brief and let loose for 30 hours to develop an innovative and creative app.

There was yawning, there was napping, there were odd smells… but nothing an emergency supply of toothbrushes and toothpaste couldn’t fix. The energy drinks were flowing, the brains were pumping and the students created some amazing work and learnt some valuable lessons. “I learnt that the presentation is just as, if not more important, as the product itself” said one student.  Another student loved the real world experience “where like-minded people gather and work towards a common goal”.

Congratulations to our innovative first prize winners. Taking home $2000 was Damien Robinson, Joaquin Ramirez Reyes and Joshua Murchie. They blew the judges away with their creative answer to planning your degree and subject choices.

Taking out second prize and $1000 was Jaden Vaniersel, Ian Murnane, Harley Jarrett. They built an app allowing you to share locations, events, study tips and a very helpful assignment countdown clock – what student doesn’t need that?!

Best User Interface and $500, went to Harrison Croaker, William Fischer and Carl Humphries for their ‘M8te’ design.

Thank you to Greg Phipps, our very own alumni and Technical Program Manager, Google Maps, and Leigh Ellen Potter, Senior Lecturer, School of ICT, who provided some wise words to the participants. Their videos provided relief and inspiration during their short breaks.

Thanks to our sponsor, Grove Juice for keeping the students hydrated. Read the rest of this entry »