Get to know your library with a library tour

Our libraries are so much more than just books on shelves. There are study areas, bookable group study spaces, helpful library staff, computers, laptop loans, printers and much more.

Want to get to know your campus library a bit better? We’re here to show you around!

Next week, 22 to 26 October 2018, we’re running library tours daily.

Library Campus Location Time Frequency
Gold Coast Graham Jones Building (G10) 10.30 am – 1.30 pm Every half-hour, on the hour and half hour
Logan Wayne Goss Centre (L03) 12 noon – 2 pm As required
Mt Gravatt Information Services Centre (M13) 12 noon – 2 pm As required
Nathan Willett Centre (N53) 10 am – 2 pm Every half-hour, on the hour and half hour
South Bank Conservatorium (S01 1.23) &
College of Art (S03)
12 noon – 2 pm As required

Are you keen? You don’t need to book, just rock up to the library and meet us in the foyer. See you there!

 


Top 10 library and IT questions asked in Week One

When you don’t know the answer to a question at uni, where do you go? If you said Google, you are right. But if you said Ask Us, you are even more right (that’s a thing, right?)

Ask Us provides you with answers to frequently asked questions at Griffith University. It covers hard hitting topics such as referencing, Learning@Griffith, assignment help, WiFi, network and cybersecurity.

Ask Us is indexed by Google, so if you ask good ol’ Google a question about library or IT topics, you will most likely get an answer from Us. Ask Us.

But what exactly do other students ask, you ask? That’s a good question. In an effort to provide you with insight into your fellow students (and not because we are nosy), we did a little digging and came up with surprising results.

We looked at the questions that students asked in the first week of Trimester 2, and funnily enough, it’s all about referencing, assignment submission and online lectures. That’s right, assignment submissions. In Week One!

Here’s the top 10 library and IT questions that you (the students) asked in Week One:

  1. 1. What is the difference between a reference list and bibliography?
  2. 2. Why am I being asked to login to Echo360?
  3. 3. My assessment has been marked in Turnitin. How do I see my marks and feedback?
  4. 4. How do I cite the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights in APA 6th style?
  5. 5. Can I view online recordings of lectures?
  6. 6. What is common time?
  7. 7. How do I access my Turnitin digital receipt?
  8. 8. How do I reference a document I found on Google?
  9. 9. What is a Turnitin submission ID?
  10. 10. I submitted the wrong assignment to Turnitin. What should I do?

Do you have a question? Ask Us!


Four reasons to visit the library this Summer

It’s the first day of summer!

Whether you’re blasting the aircon to escape the heat, or headed for the beach to enjoy the heat, we’re guessing heading to the library probably isn’t quite at the top of your ‘things to do this summer’ list.

That said, we totally think the library should be on it. Hear us out. There are some pretty cool perks here, including:

We have aircon

We were once students too. Council pickup and mi goreng were our friends. Energy bills were not. If you’re living in an run down (a-hem, quaint) share house without aircon, or simply don’t want to foot that exxy electricity bill, come to us instead. Relax in a cool environment – both literally and figuratively!

And magazines too

We’ve told you about PressReader before, but we’re gonna remind you. PressReader provides access to a range of newspapers and magazines, such as Cosmopolitan, Games Master, Reader’s Digest, Vogue, The Guardian, GQ, and many more!  So sit back in the aircon, relax, and read a ‘zine (do people still call them that?).

Get on the net

We have computers, laptops and Wi-Fi. Oh my! Common-use computers are available in the library. Or if you prefer to recline in a beanbag with a laptop or mobile device, you can do that too. Borrow a laptop from the library for free, or bring your own device and connect to the university Wi-Fi.

Utilise our study spaces

Maybe you’re committed and studying this Trimester 3. If so, we have a range of study spaces you can utilise, including silent, quiet, social and bookable group study spaces. Get in the zone and focus. Food and retail stores are still open on campus, so you’ll be able to get coffee to fuel you!


How far have we come in supporting LGBTIQA+ youth?

Griffith Library and ALLY Network join together!

Media has made scare tactics an artform with the marriage equality postal survey – from both sides!  Griffith Library and the ALLY Network present: Moral panic, media mayhem, and safety for our LGBTIQA+ youth: how far have we really come?

We have seen an increase in mainstream media representations of gender fluidity and sexual diversity.  Television such as the return of Will & Grace; a gay couple portrayed as a ‘heteronormative’ lifestyle in Modern Family; as well as transgender actress Laverne Cox on the cover of Time magazine.  Add to this, Caitlin Jenner sharing the journey of her transition, we can’t help but think times are changing.

But how far have we really come?

Our panel will discuss subjects such as moral panic, bullying, Safe Schools, and cultural change.

When
Tuesday 17 October 2017  |  noon – 1:00pm

Where
QCA Lecture Theatre (S05), Room 2.04, South Bank campus

RSVP
Registration is essential and will close on Monday 16 October 2017


Lightning Talks is Real Speak

For those of you who weren’t among the sixty plus audience members at last week’s Lightning Talks in the Nathan Campus library – have no fear, we’ve got you covered!

So what are Lightning Talks?
Lightning Talks are similar to soapbox events or Speakers’ Corner in Hyde Park, London, where speakers give voice to a variety of topical issues and invite discussion on current affairs.

Our academics and professional experts are invited to talk for 10 minutes to talk about their work in relation to a theme, and then the audience is invited to ask questions.

Why do we hold these talks?

We are hoping to make research and ideas more accessible, removing the stigma of ‘ivory towers’, breaking down hierarchical divisions. Lightning Talks are an extension of Griffith University’s commitment to inclusivity, and bringing disciplines together.

Our speakers for #LightningTalks3 were:

Associate Professor Georgina Murray who kicked off the talks with her discussion centring on socio-political changes occurring in the world, and the effects of neoliberal political ideology, particularly around employment. She highlighted some shocking statistics about the casualisation of the Australian labour force with some of the societal ramifications being drug addiction, financial insecurity around obtaining home loans, and a lack of sick leave. So do companies like Uber break up monopolies of power or do they further contribute to marginalisation and disenfranchisement in our turbulent times?

Dr Duncan McDonnell discussed the rise of right-wing populism internationally and compared Australia’s One Nation with the more successful right-wing populists in Western Europe. He highlighted that right-wing populism is not historically new; we just rename it to go with the current time period. And whilst Donald Trump does not conform to the populist leader ideal; it must be acknowledged how his controversial nature got him elected once, and he can be again! Across the Atlantic, populist parties in Europe do well because unlike their mainstream counterparts, they focus on grassroots community engagement.

Dr Susanna Chamberlain started with asking the question, ‘What the heck is populism?’ and then led us on a journey that linked anthropology and history to binaries around populism. Populism, it appears, is about the leader’s’ ability to identify as the ‘common person’ aka ‘we are just like you’ ideal; however, that idea is often a misnomer as one might suspect with Donald Trump’s empire building — funded by a ‘small’ loan of a million dollars from his father– that hardly mirrors the average ‘common person’s’ start in life.

Mr John Tague, Griffith Review Managing Editor, brought his experience and knowledge as an international journalist to discuss changes in journalistic reporting and political writing. Griffith Review, a compilation of long form essays, engages its audience and reinvigorates the idea that not everything can – or should – be conveyed in 140 character Tweets. Brexit, Trump and right-wing European leaders regularly take to the mediasphere, often invoking moral panic by circulating narratives about alleged racial tensions, scientific knowledges, and rise of ‘fake news’ in the post- truth politics era.

For the full story, listen here.

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