Access our range of online resources this break!

While we may be closed over the end of year break, it certainly doesn’t mean that you have to miss out!

If you’re sitting at home, thinking ‘gee the worst part of this holiday is that I can’t visit my favourite place ever, and all the wonderful friendly staff there’ (that’s totally what you’re thinking right? Knew it. We kinda like to be modest about it, but our telepathy skills are almost as good as Karen Smith’s), don’t fret!

Griffith library has a range of online resources you can utilise from home this break!

There’s PressReader, which lets you access a range of magazines and newspapers. In fact, we can even recommend a few for you.

Then there’s our extensive range of eBooks. To search for eBooks, simply click within the library catalogue, select Books, and filter to Electronic only. Now recline in your desk chair (or lay in bed with your laptop/tablet) and read away.

If you’re feeling studious, why not check out our range of databases and keep those cogs in your brain turning.

Our library website is also full of useful information and study tips. You could even brush up on your study skills in prep for 2018 (because that’s your new year’s resolution, right? See, telepathy. Told you).

And, don’t worry, we’ll be back with our smiling faces bright and early on Tuesday 2 January 2018.


Save time researching by using our Library Guides

Are you finding that researching for your assignment takes ages? There’s just so many resources available in the library and you are spending valuable time trying to find the right ones.

Wouldn’t it be such a great time-saver if all the databases and resources for your study area were in one, easily accessible place?

Well, they are.  Our discipline librarians have worked hard to compile all the databases and key information resources you’ll need for your subject area into one centralised area. Check out their carefully curated Library Guides!

To find them, head to the Borrowing and Resources library page. You’ll see the wide range of subjects covered by our Library Guides – from criminology and law to humanities, social sciences and languages, we are pretty sure we’ve got something for everyone.

You can select a broad area, such as Health, to see all relevant databases. Or you can further narrow your selection to a specific discipline area, such as Nursing and Midwifery for more detailed information.

Using the resources in these subject guides can help ensure you’re finding information relevant to your specific subject area.

For example, if you were wanting to find information on the chemistry of heavy metals, you’d take a squiz at the Chemistry guide. However, if you wanted to find information on the musical genre of heavy metal, you’d want to be looking at the Music guide.


Where to start your research

While Wikipedia is great for giving you a quick understanding of a topic, we don’t recommend you ever use it in an assignment. Effective researching is a critical uni skill. But where should you start? 

Course readings

Course readings are great place to start when doing research for assignments.

Find your course Reading List in Learning@Griffith. It can be found in your course profile, in the Readings section of your course site, or by searching for your course here.

Reading Lists provide you with links to online resources (eBooks, journal articles, web pages), or to the Library catalogue so you can find print resources.

Library catalogue

The Library catalogue is a great place to search for resources.

From books, journal articles and videos to conference proceedings, newspaper articles and online documents, the Library catalogue has it all, and more!

It lets you search for a huge number of resources in one place – the search box on the library home page.

Databases

To find specialised information, you will need to use online search tools, like the Library databases.

You can search databases to find specialised resources, such as:

The library also has databases for different disciplines. So if you require information on a business, law, education, health, science or social science topic, there is a database for you.

Not sure which database to search for your discipline? Check out our handy library guides.

Google Scholar

Now, you’ve probably used Google to search for information before. Whether it was for academic, work or recreational purposes, we all know how helpful the search engine can be.

But did you know Google has an academic search engine? Google Scholar is a search engine which searches a wide variety of sources including academic online journals, conference papers, dissertations, technical reports and books.

You can even use Google Scholar to find academic resources at Griffith University. It’s as simple as changing a setting. Head to the About Google Scholar webpage to find out how.

– Extract from Study Smart –


Save time researching by using our subject guides

Photo of heavy metal band

Iron Maiden are heavy metal like the music, not the elements…

Are you finding that researching for your assignment takes ages? Like, longer than the wait for the new season of Game of Thrones to be released?

Wouldn’t it be such a great time-saver if all the databases and resources for your study area were in one, easily accessible place?

Well, they are. Our discipline librarians have worked hard to compile all the databases and key information resources you’ll need for your subject area into one centralised area. Just go to the Borrowing and Resources library page, and select your subject area under Library guides.  

You can select a broad area, such as Health, to see all relevant databases. Or you can further narrow your selection to a specific discipline area, such as Nursing and Midwifery for more detailed information.

Using the resources in these subject guides can help ensure you’re finding information relevant to your specific subject area.

For example, if you were wanting to find information on the chemistry of heavy metals, you’d take a squiz at the Chemistry guide. However, if you wanted to find information on the musical genre of heavy metal, you’d want to be looking at the Music guide.


Take care of business with new online resources

Are you studying business? You should check out the new business resources available online via the library catalogue. Whether you need an eBook on finance, accounting or banking, or an encyclopedia of economics, we’ve got you covered.

There are hundreds of new eBook titles available in Oxford Scholarship Online (OSO). Oxford Scholarship Online is an online library with over 13,000 academic books from Oxford University Press.

90 new titles have been added to the Business and Management collection in OSO. This includes books on industrial relations, accounting, knowledge management, marketing and more.

Or if economics and finance are more your thing, there are 126 new titles to browse, search and read in the Oxford Scholarship Online Economics and Finance collection.

From econometrics and financial economics to economic history and macroeconomics, the Economics and Finance collection provides a comprehensive coverage of the topic.

There’s also a brand new online encyclopedia available to you. The SAGE Encyclopedia of Economics & Society is a ‘non-technical resource for students and researchers within social science programs who seek to better understand economics through a contemporary lens’.

Emphasising the contemporary world, contemporary issues, and society, the encyclopedia features four volumes with approximately 800 articles ranging from 1,000 to 5,000 words.

For more online business resources, be sure to have a look at the business and government Library Guides.


Advertising you actually want to see

Girl waking up to music from clock radio

Vintage ads are awesome! Wake up to music! © The Advertising Archives. Further reproduction prohibited without permission.

Advertising is prolific.

They interrupt your favourite shows on television, they are literally every single page of the last mag you purchased and don’t even get me started on Facebooks ads (those sponsored posts featuring products you just viewed are super creepy).

But ads can be a delight. Especially when they are of the vintage variety and feature old fashioned products with politically incorrect slogans. Whether it’s for cigarettes, canned soup or laundry soap, old-school advertisements can be comical, kooky or just plain questionable.

Want to see some ads from yesteryear? Take a look at the American Consumer Culture database and view hundreds of advertising images in the Ad Gallery.

American Consumer Culture ‘is a treasure trove of information on some of America’s best-known brands’. The Ad Gallery features American advertisements from the 1920’s through to the 1960’s. Think brands like Clairol, Cadbury, Coca-Cola and Colgate. Barbie also makes an appearance but she doesn’t quite look herself in one of the ads.

Oh, and since the database features advertising from days of old when cigarette advertising wasn’t taboo, you’ll also find well-known tobacco brands like Lucky Strike and Marlboro (you must have heard of the Marlboro Man?)

But the database is more than just advertising images. American Consumer Culture provides a unique insight into the American consumer boom of the mid-20th century through access to the market research reports and supporting documents of Ernest Dichter; the era’s foremost consumer analyst and market research pioneer.

Basically, it contains heaps of information on advertising, such as a creative research memorandum on the psychology of hot dogs, a report on how to get more people to go to the movies, a pilot study on the Bird’s Eye logo, and more.

Not that you’ll need more. Once you understand the mind science of a sausage, your consumer culture education is complete. No, not really. Check out American Consumer Culture today.


Music eResources and all that jazz

music

Without music, life would B flat. That’s why you should visit Alexander Street and treat yourself to streaming music, videos and scores.

Whether you are into jazz, hip-hop, pop or opera, Alexander Street will surely have a tune or two for you.

So where is this musical street? West End? The Valley? Or some exotic destination, like Havana, Seattle or Ibiza? Actually, it’s an online music platform and available via the Library Catalogue.

Alexander Street is a massive collection of music databases that you can easily search and browse. Want to search across all the collections for a particular composer, performer, genre or subject? You totally can.

Here’s a small selection of what’s on offer:

Classical Scores Library

Scores for all major classical musical genres and time periods, from the Middle Ages to the 21st century. With full, study, piano, and vocal scores, this comprehensive collection will enhance the study of music history, performance, composition and theory for a variety of scholars. Scores are great to use when listening to a recording!

Classical Music in Video

Classical music performances, including major orchestral performances by leading orchestras, chamber music, oratorio, and solo performances. There’s also masterclasses and interviews with master teachers from around the world.

The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music 

A comprehensive online resource devoted to music research of all the world’s peoples. You can browse and search hundreds of articles about the music of every continent. Articles are enriched with audio tracks, musical illustrations, photographs, drawings, song texts, score examples, charts and maps.

Jazz Music Library

The largest and most comprehensive collection of streaming jazz available online — with thousands of jazz artists, ensembles, albums, and genres.

Opera in Video 

Five hundred hours of the most important opera performances captured on video through staged productions, interviews, and documentaries. Selections represent the world’s best performers, conductors, and opera houses and are based on a work’s importance to the operatic canon.

Popular Music Library

A wide range of popular music from around the world, including hundreds of thousands of tracks from major genres in pop music, including alternative, country, Christian, electronic, hip-hop, metal, punk, new age, R&B, reggae, rock, soundtracks and many more.