The light ascending: Creativity unites us all

“No one gives a creative rules, we make rules for ourselves.” Vanessa Tomlinson.

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The final Lightning Talks of the year was all kinds of quotable! To end the year with a bang of creative flair, Griffith Review and Griffith Library called on some creative experts. Our panelists Vanessa Tomlinson, Holden Sheppard, Andrew Brown and Mirandi Riwoe were on-board to give us some insight into their creativity endeavors and processes, inspiring us in the lead up to the end of the year.

Our creatives talked about their own processes, how they view creativity and how creativity exists in each and every one of us. As Mirandi put it “‘All of it is tied to hard work and learning your craft… Imagination and the creative side of things is tied to work ethic and the discipline to get things down on the page.”

Not only did we examine the process of creativity, but we discussed the ways in which creative endeavors and art can benefit everyone. Art helps us make sense of our world, our traumas and our triumphs, our history and our place in the world.  And in Andrew Brown’s words “creativity comprises [of] novelty and value”.

Holden Sheppard talked about his book as an “experimentation in self” allowing him to use character and narrative to represent different aspects of himself. He reflected on writing as a way to fill gaps, to re-imagine possibilities — and for the better.

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The panelists agreed that no matter what your art of choice, all creatives have a commonality, especially when it comes to their creative processes and their appreciation of what art can bring.

In addition to the panel, we were treated to a viewing of QCA student Ashley Peel’s work “Covered in Gold” which explores a retelling of Cinderella and the feminist ideal.

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The audience, as always, asked amazing questions and we all walked away itching to pick up a pen or paintbrush…or even just an excellent book.

A huge thank you to our panelists for sharing their creative selves. A special thanks also goes to to our moderator Dr Ashley Hay from Griffith Review, and the hardworking team who helped bring this Lightning Talks event together.DSC_0327

Join us next year for more Lightning Talks but in the meantime you can catch ‘The light ascending: Illuminating creativity’ and all of the 2019 series at Griffith Library Lightning Talks


Lightning Talks: Crimes and Punishments

Exploring the darker side of human nature

Since the appropriation and settlement of Australia’s mainland to the present time, much has changed in our approach and attitudes to crimes and punishments. Most notably, it has been a shift from large-scale convict transportation, with its comprehensive system of colonial justice and punishment, to ideas of justice and retribution that include restorative justice, justice reinvestment and social-benefit bonds. Through a number of stories, retribution, reform and rehabilitation are themes explored in Griffith Review 65: Crimes and Punishments.

Also, these themes are often reflected in research – the impact of crime on family and community and, of the changing attitudes to criminology on reform and rehabilitation. The following snapshot of open access research, held in Griffith Research Online, forms part of the research narrative around the interconnection between crime and punishment and societal impact and attitudes:

Read more Griffith University research on crime and punishment.

Please join us at the Griffith Review and Griffith Library presentation of Lightning talks: Crimes and Punishments.

Featuring experts:

Prof Susan Dennison

Professor Susan Dennison is a professor and deputy head of school (Research) in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University as well as deputy director of the Griffith Criminology Institute.

Prof Ross Homel

Professor Ross Homel is Foundation Professor of the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University. His research is focused on preventing crime, violence and injuries, and promoting the positive development of children and young people living in crime disadvantaged communities.

Dr Sarah Woodland

Dr Sarah Woodland is a practitioner, researcher and educator in applied theatre, specialising in participatory arts and prison theatre. Currently she is a Research Fellow at Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre.

Dr Lacey Schaefer

Dr Lacey Schaefer is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University and a Research Fellow with the Griffith Criminology Institute. A 2017 study undertaken by Dr Schaefer in environmental corrections saw a 28% reduction in reoffending.

Date

  1. Wednesday 21 August 2019
    Noon – 1 pm

Location

  1. Mt Gravatt Library (M13) Level 2

Crimes and Punishments


📅Date: Wed, 21/08/19

⏰Time: Noon-1pm

🏠Place: M13 Mt. Gravatt Library (Level 2)

Griffith Review and Griffith Library bring you the Lightning Talks your true-crime loving heart has been waiting for.

Griffith Library has been bringing you Lighting Talks for over two years now. Never been to one and not sure what to expect? No worries! Lightning Talks are similar to Ted Talks, with our speakers giving their expert opinion on a topical subject in a short amount of time.

Lightning Talks: Crimes and Punishments takes the Griffith Review Edition 65 topics further to explore the complex nature of crime and justice.

Featuring an expert panel, we will also have time for questions, so come along and enjoy!

Featuring:

Professor Susan Dennison is Professor and Deputy Head of School (Research) in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University as well as Deputy Director of the Griffith Criminology Institute.

Professor Ross Homel is Foundation Professor of the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University. His research is focused on preventing crime, violence and injuries, and promoting the positive development of children and young people living in crime disadvantaged communities.

Dr Sarah Woodland is a practitioner, researcher and educator in applied theatre, specializing in participatory arts and prison theatre. Currently she is a Research Fellow at Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre.

Dr Lacey Schaefer is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University and a Research Fellow with the Griffith Criminology Institute. A 2017 study undertaken by Dr. Lacey Schaefer in environmental corrections saw a 28% reduction in reoffending.

Stay tuned on Facebook as we bring you more information on these incredible speakers.

#GriffithReview #GriffithLibrary #LightningTalks


Crimes and Punishments: Lightning Talk

What is it about crime stories that has us so compelled? From true crime podcasts to Netflix bingeing on tales of the allegedly wrongfully convicted, we get hooked.

Behind every true crime narrative are real people; the victims, witnesses, the advocates, the practitioners. Every crime is a story and just conclusions are often elusive.

Griffith Review and Griffith Library are teaming up to present Lightning Talks: Crimes and Punishments to support the publication of Griffith Review 65 – Crimes and Punishments. This Lightning talks events will explore the complex and fascinating question of why justice can wear so many guises and how crimes and punishments affect the every day.

Prof Susan Dennison

Professor Susan Dennison is a professor and deputy head of school (Research) in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University as well as deputy director of the Griffith Criminology Institute.

Prof Ross Homel

Professor Ross Homel is Foundation Professor of the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University. His research is focused on preventing crime, violence and injuries, and promoting the positive development of children and young people living in crime disadvantaged communities.

Dr Sarah Woodland

Dr Sarah Woodland is a practitioner, researcher and educator in applied theatre, specialising in participatory arts and prison theatre. Currently she is a Research Fellow at Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre.

Dr Lacey Schaefer

Dr Lacey Schaefer is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University and a Research Fellow with the Griffith Criminology Institute. A 2017 study undertaken by Dr. Lacey Schaefer in environmental corrections saw a 28% reduction in reoffending.

Date:

Wednesday 21 August 2019
Noon – 1 pm

Where:

Mt Gravatt Library (M13) Level 2


Lightning Talks: the new disruptors was a success

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The New Disruptors Lightning talk was held in the Collaboratory at Logan Campus Library on the 23 May.

Panellists were:

Margaret Gibson

Margaret is a cultural sociologist and academic at Griffith University who specialises in death, grief, public mourning and media cultures.

Second Life, an online virtual world.

“When someone has lived a rich digital life, that life may be mourned on its own terms.”

“The physical legacy of a deceased person, their remaining effects, over which we mourn and sometime bicker, has a digital corollary – their digital remains – composed of connections, rather than artefacts.”

Dr Dinesh Palipana

Dinesh Palipana is currently a resident medical officer at the Gold Coast University Hospital. He has research interests in spinal cord injury, particularly with novel rehabilitation techniques.

Dinesh explained how spinal cord injury had been considered inoperable since Ancient Egypt. Yet in Switzerland in 2013, electrostimulation therapy in rats allowed them to recover the use of their hind legs.

He detailed the battle of trying to be certified as a doctor after suffering a spinal injury that confined him to a wheelchair. Dinesh pushed for equity and access for the disabled and curbing the “they told me it was impossible to become a doctor, but I wouldn’t accept it. They say that spinal injury can’t be treated, but we don’t believe it. We think it can.”

Assoc Prof Ingrid Burkett

Ingrid Burkett is one of the co-directors of Griffith University’s Yunus Social Business Centre based in Logan. The mission of the Yunus Social Business Centre is to equip people with the knowledge, capacity, and opportunities to innovate and create social impact through business.

Ingrid Burkett spoke about the difficult employment conditions in the gig economy, a free market system involving short-term contracted services through apps such as Uber, Deliveroo, and Airtasker, with the negatives of this kind of disruption. She suggested positive social disruptions for invisible categories, such as contracting and better procurement of work rather than living with the anxieties of the precariat, an emerging social class defined by work insecurity, in pursuit of technological expediency.

Ian Townsend

Ian is completing his history PhD on the 1899 Pearling Fleet Disaster at the University of Queensland. He worked for many years with ABC Radio National and is the winner of four Eureka Prizes for science and medical journalism.

Ian Townsend posed the question: As a historian, how do we get from ‘what happened’ to ‘what we think happened.’

“We forge ahead by breaking old narratives.”

“It’s only human to adjust our own memories to fit a preferred narrative, even when it doesn’t fit the evidence. It’s also what we do as a nation.”

If you missed out – you can check out our live stream of the event!


Lightning talks: The New Disruptors

Digital disruption is viewed with suspicion. We are better connected than ever but feel on edge.

What are the ethical, moral and social consequences of our enmeshed online world? With tech revolutions rocking the foundations of society, how can we allay these fears?

Is the enjoyment in your life slipping away under a morass of Facebook notifications and Twitter mentions? Worried your personal information was compromised by Cambridge Analytica to swing an election?

Do you enjoy memes but hate when they’re co-opted to sell products? And what are influencers anyway?

Griffith Review and Griffith Library are presenting Lightning talks- The New Disruptors featuring two Griffith Review contributors:

Ian Townsend

  1. Ian is completing his history PhD on the 1899 Pearling Fleet Disaster at the University of Queensland. He worked for many years with ABC Radio National and is the winner of four Eureka Prizes for science and medical journalism. His books include the novels Affection (4th Estate, 2007) and The Devil’s Eye (HarperCollins, 2008), and the non-fiction Line of Fire (HarperCollins, 2017).

Margaret Gibson

  1. Margaret is a cultural sociologist and academic at Griffith University. Her books include Objects of the Dead: Mourning and Memory in Everyday Life (MUP, 2008) and the recently co-authored Living and Dying in a Virtual World: Digital Kinships, Nostalgia, and Mourning in Second Life (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018).

Assoc Prof Ingrid Burkett

  1. Ingrid Burkett is one of the co-directors of Griffith University’s Yunus Social Business Centre based in Logan. The mission of the Yunus Social Business Centre is to equip people with the knowledge, capacity, and opportunities to innovate and create social impact through business.

Dr Dinesh Palipana

  1. Dinesh Palipana is currently a resident medical officer at the Gold Coast University Hospital. He is a lecturer at Griffith University and adjunct research fellow at the Menzies Health Institute of Queensland. He has research interests in spinal cord injury, particularly with novel rehabilitation techniques.

Date

  1. Thursday 23 May 2019
  2. Noon

Location

  1. Logan Library- The Collaboratory

The road to marriage equality

Same-sex marriage was legalised in Australia last year, following a nation-wide Marriage Law Postal Survey. However, the road to marriage equality and to changes in state and federal laws affecting same-sex couples, started prior to federation in 1901.

Whilst there have been many milestones along the road, the social, political and personal reverberations of the Marriage Law Postal Survey will continue into the future.  These reverberations will be explored by an expert panel on Monday 10 December 2018 at a Lightning Talk, being hosted at the Gold Coast by Griffith Review and Griffith Library (we suggest you register to attend!).

The evolution in social, political and personal attitudes and approaches towards same-sex couples is also illustrated in academic research.

The below snapshot of open access research, held in Griffith Research Online, reflects both this evolution, as well as personal experience in relation to religious freedom and same-sex relationships:

Coding desire: The emergence of a homosexualaubculture in Queensland, 1890-1914 (2007)

  • Several homosexuality-related cases brought to Queensland courts between 1899 and 1914, are analysed to explore the emergence of a homosexual subculture due to interaction of homosexual men from the fluid rural and urban spheres. The behavioral codes and patterns used by such men to attract other similar men also contributed to the emergence of the subculture.

The socio-political evolution of lesbian reality in Queensland into the 21st century (2010)

  • A photo documentary project collecting and publishing the stories of lesbian-identified-women who experienced living in Queensland in the pre-feminist era through to present day, and how they perceive the era to have defined their reality in the 21st century.

Money up front and no kissing (2014)

  • In the last three decades, gays have become increasingly mainstream. Gay representations are now commonplace in the popular media. Money Up Front and No Kissing asks how an interpretation of this legitimacy might be enhanced by creative practice. The study begins with Dennis Altman, Australian queer culture theorist’s 1982 observation of a ‘new homosexual’ emerging in the decade after the birth of the gay rights movement.

The formal recognition of sex identity (2014)

  • Until March 2014, it was widely assumed that a person’s sex could only be recorded in the Australian state and territory Registers of Births, Deaths and Marriages as either female or male. This assumption is no longer accurate, following two significant developments.

The ebb and flow of homophobia: A gender taboo theory (2014)

  • A key challenge for gender theory and practice is to explain the circumstances in which homophobia either intensifies or declines. In addition to the important theoretical implications of such an explanation, being able to clearly delineate the mechanisms that drive the ebb and flow of homophobia, raises the prospect that one day it might be possible to eradicate this important antisocial problem.

When Christianity and homosexuality collide: Understanding the potential intrapersonal conflict (2012)

  • Reconciling sexual orientation with religious and spiritual beliefs can be challenging for Christian homosexuals, since many Christian churches teach that homosexual behavior is sinful. This article seeks to explore the potential conflict between Christianity and homosexuality faced by the respondents of a quantitative study of Christian homosexuals (male and female). Participants’ life stories and experiences varied widely.

A better understanding of the potential conflict between Christianity and homosexuality (2011)

  • Most organised religions, including Christianity, still regard homosexuality as being against their teachings, as sinful and contrary to scripture. Thus, the matter of reconciling sexual orientation with religious and spiritual beliefs can be a very challenging and complicated process for those homosexual persons who uphold Christianity as their religion. This paper seeks to explore the potential conflict between Christianity and homosexuality faced by the respondents.