Human Library a success!

Did you ‘borrow’ a human book?

As we celebrated Harmony Week across the University, we held our annual Human Library on March 20. This event provided an opportunity to converse with someone about their lives, what makes them who they are, and most importantly, creates a safe place for open communication and ideas. The Human Library hopes to break down barriers, challenge beliefs and create a more tolerant society.

This year we had 14 wonderful human ‘books’, brave enough to share their stories with our readers. The books on offer included Sexually Abused Child, Lesbian Priest, Alcoholic, Prisoner of War, Jewish, along with representatives of our First People and many more. The Readers and Books asked questions and listened, in turn recognising the Human Book is not just a label, but they also had a story to tell.

Head over to our YouTube channel and take a look at the final product that raps up the day perfectly.

 

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Borrow a human book

 

What happens when you get a group of people together in one room sharing their life stories, confronting social stigma and challenging prejudice? Magic!

Immerse yourself in a bestseller of a different kind at our Human Library.

On Wednesday 20 March 2019, we are flipping the Nathan campus library on its head and offering you the chance to borrow a person, instead of a book!

We’ve gathered together a group of storytellers keen to share their experience with social stigma, prejudice and discrimination in the hope to break down barriers, challenge beliefs and create a more tolerant society.

In our Human Library, you can borrow a human book on a certain topic and sit down with them for an honest and open 20 minute chat about their life experiences and the issues they have faced.

What kind of books can you borrow at our Human Library?

Want to borrow a human book? Want to be involved in this unforgettable experience? Register as a reader in our Human Library. There are limited sessions available in this two-hour event, so get in quick!

Book: Julie and Tara

Title: Cancer Vol 1&2

Story: We don’t refer to ourselves as “survivors”, as for us, the train we hopped on had to make it to the station where we could both hope off to a “new normal”. We both live with the guilt of seeing friends hop on the train, but the journey ended so differently. Our stories are similar in so many ways, but our journeys to our new normal were dramatically different. We are two friends, both diagnosed with breast cancer at the same age. Both adopted, so we had no idea if breast cancer was in our families. What we do know is cancer can also bring positive outcomes and the bond we now have is one of them.

Register for this book

Book: Uncle Bob

Title: Hidden Generation

Story: I was born to an Aboriginal father and a non-Aboriginal mother who separated when I was about three. It was the time of the stolen generation, when indigenous children were being taken from their families by government agencies. To avoid being identified as an Aboriginal, I was raised with my mother and white brothers along with grandparents, uncles, aunties and cousins.
I was never allowed contact with my Aboriginal relatives for fear I would be taken away. I was denied any access to my culture or my father’s family. I left home around sixteen to make my own way as a young man, which is what all of my instincts told me to do. It was much to the disapproval of my family and I have had no understanding from them or close ties with them ever since.
It wasn’t until most of my mother’s family had passed away that my aunty confirmed that my father was an Aboriginal. She could not remember where his family came from so to trace them has been a nightmare. The search for more information and understanding of my culture is ongoing. I put a lot of time into community work, but I still struggle to understand why I have the feelings I do and why am I who I am, and I am still coming to grips with my spiritual self. This is a legacy of being one of the hidden generation, at least the stolen generation know who they are and where they are from, they haven’t lived in this cultural void I call no mans land.

Register for this book

Book: Gemma

Title: Obesity

Story: I struggled with my weight since the age of 22. At a hight of 5’6 and weighing over 142kg I had tried everything to lose weight. I was so obese that I needed a walking stick to get around. When my doctor told me I would be dead in 10 years, I made a decision that would change my life. Aged 34 (at the time) and a mother of 2 children, I was not ready to die so young. My doctor suggested Gastric Sleeve Surgery, where 80% of the stomach is removed to reduce portion of food intake. I agreed on the spot, and started shopping around for a good surgeon. Less than 6 months later, I was on the operating table. That was in October 2017, and I have lost over 50kg and only have 20kg left to reach my goal. Most of my weight fell off me within the first 9 months after surgery, and I said good bye to my walking stick only 2 months after. It was the best decision of my life. I love my sleeve!

Register for this book

Book: Donald

Title: Sexually Abused Child

Story: On a warm November afternoon in 1988, I was sitting next to my mother on a chartered bus from the Gold Coast to Brisbane. We were on a trip to see Whitney Houston in concert. I was sipping on my second glass of champagne, my second, ever. We were happily chatting, yet during the course of this conversation I blithely told Mum that I had been repeatedly sexually abused by John- when we lived in Mildred Street. I was 15 when I told Mum. I had lived with that secret for more than half my life. I saw my mother’s face crumple. It was heartbreaking. Despite all that I knew, this was the worst moment of my life… until then. That’s what abuse does. I may have learnt at an early age about depravity- but with that an ever-present sense of fortitude and compassion. And that’s what forgiveness does.

Register for this book

Book: Aunty Heather

Title: Female Elder

Story: I am a proud Kamilaroi-Kooma (Aboriginal) woman. I believe in bridging the gap and understanding with Reconciliation in my heart and growing as equals together as one. I believe that we need to develop an understanding of all cultures that make up the island we call our country of Australia, that we love and want to share with the world. As a younger person, I worked for 27 years in the outback on cattle and sheep stations, shearing sheds and earth moving camps. Today, I am Acting Aboriginal Co-Chair of Reconciliation Queensland Inc. and sit on the Board of Murrigunyah (Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islanders Corporation for Women). I am Director of DV Connect (Domestic Violence service QLD) and work as an Aboriginal Elder running Cultural Workshops. For the past 14 years, I have worked as an Indigenous Cultural Consultant for Queensland Health in Child & Youth Mental Health Service.

Register for this book

Book: Susan

Title: First in Family

Story: I’m a country girl from remote NSW, turned international lawyer on the world’s stage. I was the first in my family to attend University and started my law degree with no contacts, no clue whatsoever about what a University degree entailed, but with high hopes about what my future could hold. Now I’m a proud International Lawyer and advocate for human, womens and refugee rights. Trying to move mountains and create good.

Register for this book

Book: Ari

Title: Jewish

Story: I am an Australian Jew who works as a Jewish Community Worker. I am passionate about Interfaith and demonstrating how my religion with ancient roots has a modern role in society. I am a survivor of childhood sexual abuse and have been through the path of self destructive behaviors and now facilitate at a men’s group MARS (Men Affected by Rape and Sexual Abuse) to help other men through the healing recovery process. I believe communication is the key to bringing down barriers.

Register for this book

Book: Chrissie

Title: Girl in a van

Story: I packed up my cosy apartment life, sold all my belongings and moved into a van, all the while staying in my home city and continuing my full-time job. It’s been two years now, and I’ve moved on to a roomier box truck, which I’m slowly converting into a functional tiny home whilst living inside. It’s still raw and has only a few amenities, but I’ve added some girly touches and it feels like home. I sleep in a different location most nights and spend the weekends road-tripping or staying at beaches and forests. I realise I can’t do this forever in the one town, so I’m saving and building and one day I’ll be able to quit the job and travel the country.

Register for this book

Book: Uncle John

Title: Aboriginal

Story: I am a Senior Learning Assistance Officer in the GUMURRII unit on Griffith’s Nathan Campus. I am a traditional custodian of the Gold Coast region, a Kombumerri man, a saltwater man of the Gold Coast part of the wider Yugumbeh Language Group. The Yugumbeh lands are located between the Logan River in the north and the Tweed River in the south. They are bordered by the mountains to the west and the ocean to the east. I am also a Griffith Business School graduate, Alumni and long-term employee (18 years) of Griffith University. I am a member of the Griffith Council of Elders and have the privilege of being acknowledged as an Elder on the Yugumbeh Elders Group.

Register for this book

Book: Jazmina

Title: Ex-muslim

Story: I’ve been on both sides – from Hijab-wearing devout Muslim to an unveiled ex-Muslim atheist. I left Islam after feeling a disconnection between my world views and the Islamic teachings, especially on matters regarding gender roles, the LGBTQI community and capital punishment. It’s a scary position to be in because some Muslims believe that apostates should be killed. Often, Muslims who wish to leave the religion never manage to do so out of fear of receiving death threats and being excommunicated from their communities. It is for the same reasons that I have not told my family and I continue to lead a double life when they visit me. If I have the chance to speak to people, I would share my story of me exercising my human right to non-religious freedom, and I would make a clear distinction between disagreeing with Islam and Islamophobia.  

Register for this book

Book: Narelle

Title: Lesbian Catholic Priest

Story: I was ordained in 2010 as the first female Catholic Priest in Australia. I am a lesbian, foster mother, activist and passionate permaculturist and committed to providing a safe, welcoming and accepting church community for people to find comfort, inclusion and reflection. After suffering a major stroke in 2003 I dramatically changed my career paths. From the Chief Executive Officer of the statewide non-government organisation to a disability pension, I refocused my life direction, moving from a career in social work to theology. I learnt the value of good friends, fell in love and opened my heart and garden to build community. I could not be happier with my life. I love sharing my story of recovery, gardening and finding the spiritually of life on the way.

Register for this book

Book: Reena

Title: Multicultural Advocate

Story: I grew up in a small city in India and came to Australia as a student. My dream has always been to unite people from all walks of life, to remove racial barriers and replace them with a sense of belonging. I made my dream come true by organising multicultural fashion shows that challenge the stereotypes of beauty and fashion through celebrating all men and women, no matter what cultural background, shape or size. I believe beauty is in the spirit which shines through in your eyes, in your laughter and through your happiness. Diversity and acceptance is the culture we should follow and I am proud to be a platform that says no to pre-existing stereotypes of the fashion industry as we lead the way to a more inclusive future all the while promoting multiculturalism.

Register for this book

Book: Yaseen

Title: Muslim Male, Prisoner of War and Sufferer of PTSD

Story: As a 22-year-old international student, I didn’t know what September 11 really meant for Muslims until I was taken away from my hostel and locked behind bars. Nine months in a window-less cell, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, the worst was yet to come. I was treated as a soldier of the unknown enemy, who had the capability to strike but didn’t have the motive (yet). But like every story, there was a happy ending.

Register for this book

Book: Dean

Title: Urban Farmer

Story: I deeply believe that becoming more sustainable is simple, easy and achievable for everyone. We need to seriously start being more green in our homes and communities now, because everything we do has an effect on the Earth. I am an urban farmer, permaculturist and gut health guru. Originally from a rural farming background, I now strongly focus on urban farming – bringing food growing back into the towns and cities, where it has traditionally always been in sustainable cultures. I run several related local, national and international groups and projects to support homes and communities in sustainable living. Join the green revolution!

Register for this book

Book: Richo and Maggie

Title: Veteran and Assistance Dog

Story: A former Army Apprentice and member of the Royal Australian Engineers, I returned to university in my late 40s after a serious spinal cord injury. The study challenges ahead became overwhelming, until I was introduced to the Australian Student Veterans Association (ASVA). Today with the support of Maggie (Chief Happiness Officer / assistance dog), I am achieving great results in both undergraduate and postgraduate studies.

Register for this book

Book: Anne

Title: Alcoholic

Story: I lost two children, and then I lost myself. It was a long journey through pain and shame to discover who I really was. I have discovered that escaping our feelings only brings more problems, sometimes facing the pain and feeling it, can lead to enlightenment. With the help of the AA program I gained an honest understanding of what it is to be a human being, accepting our imperfections and embracing joy and suffering as the whole of life’s experience.

Register for this book

 

 


Writing the Country – the Anthropocene 

Lightning Talks: Writing the country.

The Nathan Library (N53) will be hosting the first Lightning Talk of 2019, with a focus on Place. Land. Country. Home.

Our experts will be discussing how the Australian landscape changes and what they might become, if they are flourishing or at risk as we tackle climate change.

  • Mr David Ritter
  1. CEO, Greenpeace Australia Pacific
  • Prof. Brendan Mackey
  1. Director, Griffith Climate Change Response Program
  • Dr Johanna Nalau
  1. Postdoctoral research fellow, Griffith Climate Change Response Program & Griffith Institute for Tourism

Join us as we talk about Australia and how we can be part of this amazing and unique landscape.

  1. 12 March 2019
  2. Noon
  3. Willet Centre (N53)
  4. Nathan Campus Library
  5. Register

Sustainability Week events

Griffith University was the first Australian University to offer environmental science, waaay back in the ‘70s, and our commitment to the environment hasn’t wavered since.

3 – 7 September is Sustainability Week. So, of course, Griffith is celebrating!

You’ll find an exciting array of workshops, activities and stalls at the Sustainability Fair on the Gold Coast campus, and Enviro Events at Nathan, Logan, Mt Gravatt and South Bank campuses.

Learn how you can incorporate Sustainability into your everyday life. Whether you are an eco-warrior, or just like to make sure you use the recycling bin when possible, there will be plenty on offer to entice.

So grab a coffee in your keep-cup and walk on down to the event space to enjoy.

Tuesday 4 September Wednesday 5 September Thursday 6 September
Gold Coast Sustainability Fair
10 – 2
Outside library (G10)
Logan Enviro Event
12 – 2
Community Court
Mt Gravatt Enviro Event
11.30 – 2
Community Courtyard
Nathan Enviro Event
10 – 2
Arrivals Plaza, Johnson Path & Campus Heart
South Bank Enviro Event
12 – 2
Undercroft (near S03)

The library is also throwing Lightning Talks on Waste Wars and Adapt or Die. Stay tuned on the Library Blog for further info!

Find a list of all Sustainability Week activities on the Sustainability Week webpage.


Masters and Slaves: Attend this free event and watch a literary showdown!

What are you doing Thursday night? Studying studiously, late-night shopping, chilling in bed?

While all the aforementioned are great options, let us suggest an even better one: come along to our annual Masters and Slaves event.

Who doesn’t love a good duel? Whether it’s between Rocky Balboa and Apollo Creed in Rockyor our School of Humanities, Languages and Social Sciences students and literary greats…

In this must-see event, students will perform a piece inspired by a famous author; living or dead. Whether they talk them up or take them down, we’ll find out who are the literary masters and who the slaves.

Hosted by Friends of the Library, Masters and Slaves is a crowd favourite; after all, who doesn’t love take-down critiques, satirical rants, author dedications and painful homages?

You can’t miss this epic duel! Book now:

  • When: Thursday 16 August 2018
  • Where: Drama Theatre, The Link (G07), Gold Coast Campus
  • Cost: Free, including catered food
  • Book online

Bring your idea to life at the Hackathon

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It’s free and everyone can participate!

Do you get a thrill out of creating something innovative with a great bunch of people in a fast-paced environment? Do you enjoy delicious free food and want to have a chance at winning big prize money–$2,000 anyone? Then our upcoming Hackathon event with 30 hours of hacking fun, exciting guest speakers, delicious food and great prize money is just what you have been looking for!

What the hack is a Hackathon?

A Hackathon is a social coding event that brings together a group of people with various skills (techy and non-techy) to collaboratively create a new computer program (aka software or online application).

And guess what? We are hosting one of these cool events on the weekend 4 – 5 August 2018 at the Gold Coast Campus Library where we want you– brilliant masterminds– to design, develop and showcase a mobile application that would greatly improve your and your fellow peers’ student lives.

Who can participate?

Everyone who is passionate to work together with a bunch of cool people to create something new and amazing! You don’t need to be a coder or tech savvy to take part in the Hackathon. Although we are definitely looking for techy students to write the code, teams will also require students with marketing, graphic design, project management or any other genius skill that can contribute to creating an awesome app.

How do I register?

Simply head over to our Hackathon website to register as an individual or team. Join us for an awesome weekend full of fun, with the opportunity to meet new people, enhance your skill sets and the chance to win big! It is going to be awesome!

Registrations will be open until 5pm Friday 20 July 2018.

Prizes up for grabs

$2,000 – Winning Team

$1,000 – Runner-Up Team

$500 – Best User Interface Design

REGISTER NOW


National Simultaneous Storytime a success!

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On Wednesday our library participated in National Simultaneous Storytime.

National Simultaneous Storytime is an annual event spearheaded by the Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA).

A picture book, written and illustrated by an Australian author and illustrator, is read simultaneously in libraries, schools, pre-schools, childcare centres, family homes, bookshops and many other places around the country.

This year’s book was Hickory Dickory Dash.

The entire cohort of Griffith’s on-campus school, Yarranlea Primary School, trotted up to the Mt Gravatt campus library to attend the reading.

Griffith’s Director of Library and Learning services opened the storytime event with a moving story of the importance books have had in her small-town upbringing.

School of Education Associate Professor Bev Fluckiger, a former primary school teacher and principal, then read the story to a very engaged audience.

Following the reading, the students participated in interactive colouring activities organised by our Library Services team member Jana Rutledge.Take a look through our photo slideshow to see an intricate hickory dickory clock that Jana made specifically for the event and presented to a very excited Yarranlea Primary School after.

We also screened the storytime with Facebook Live and people joined in online (including all the way from Ireland)—a simultaneous storytime, indeed!