Stay on top of your references with EndNote

Referencing is an essential skill to have as a uni student. We know, it can be pedantic: where to italicise, where to put a comma (wait, was it a comma, or a full stop?!), whether to capatalise or not….

When you start out, we recommend you use our Referencing Tool. This will help you get the hang of referencing, and what your citation should look like.

But you may get to the stage where you’re writing extensive literature reviews or maybe even a research thesis, and simply can’t manage all your 100s of citations manually.

If you’re at this point and haven’t already heard of EndNote, you probably want to take a look at it.

EndNote is Griffith’s recommended bibliographic management software, and can be used to easily:

  • Collect references
  • Organise references and documents in a searchable library
  • Create instant reference lists and/or bibliographies

It’s super handy if you have a large amount of research you need to organise. You are able to store all the citations in one place, and easily insert them straight into Word. And, as soon as you insert an in-text reference into word, the full reference will be added to the document’s Reference List section.

The best part is that it updates and syncs. If you decide to remove a section of text, which may have had an in text reference used nowhere else, this reference will automatically be removed from your Reference List too #timesaver.

As a Griffith student or staff member you can download EndNote for free from Griffith’s Software Download Service. Find out more about using EndNote here.


How to become a referencing pro

It’s a word that often sends shudders down the spines of students: referencing.

We see so many students leave referencing until the very last minute, then scramble to organise all of their references and cite them correctly. It often seems like a daunting, confusing task.

But we’re about to drop a truth bomb that you’re probably not going to believe: It’s not that scary.

Really. Please believe us. Kinda like riding a bike or pretending your problems don’t exist, once you get the hang of it, it’s a skill you’ll keep.

Then you can totally impress the next person you’re trying to pick up with your ability to correctly cite the closest book using AGPS Harvard off the top of your head. Oh, are we the only ones who find that attractive?…

So, how do you take the steps to master this skill?

As an undergraduate student where you’re generally writing shorter assignments (I know, 2000 words isn’t that short – but hey, it’s shorter than a dissertation!) we suggest you use our referencing tool to guide you with your referencing.

The referencing tool is designed to provide you with examples of direct quotations, paraphrasing and full references for a range of resources you may have used when researching a topic. Over time you’ll build up your skills in this area, and know what a reference should look like.

As you move towards more lengthy assignments, research papers, and so forth, you may be struggling to stay on top of the massive array of resources you’ve used.

Enter: EndNote.

EndNote is Griffith’s recommended bibliographic management software, and enables you to easily:

  • Collect references
  • Organise references and documents in a searchable library
  • Create instant reference lists and/or bibliographies

It’s super handy if you have a large amount of research you need to organise. You are able to store all citations in one place, and insert them straight into your document. And, as soon as you insert an in-text reference into word, the full reference will be added to the document’s Reference List section.

Best part – it updates. If you decide to remove a section of text, which may have had an in text reference used nowhere else, this reference will automatically be removed from your Reference List too #timesaver.

Ok, another best part. It’s free!

To get EndNote, follow the instructions on the EndNote page to download it.

For more information on referencing, check out our referencing study smart page.


How EndNote can help with referencing

Overwhelmed by referencing?

Referencing is an essential skill to have as a uni student.

We know, it can be pedantic: where to italicise, where to put a comma (wait, was it a comma, or a full stop?!), whether to capatalise or not….

When you start out, we recommend you use our Referencing Tool. This will help you get the hang of referencing, and what your citation should look like.

But you may get to the stage where you’re writing extensive literature reviews or maybe even a research thesis. Where you can reference APA and AGPS Harvard off the top of your head (a skill I have mastered, and am a little too proud of). At this point manually referencing can become tedious and inefficient.

If you’re at this point and haven’t already heard of EndNote, you probably want to take a look at it.

EndNote is Griffith’s recommended bibliographic management software, and can be used to easily:

  • Collect references
  • Organise references and documents in a searchable library
  • Create instant reference lists and/or bibliographies  

It’s super handy if you have a large amount of research you need to organise. You are able to store all the citations in one place, and easily insert them straight into Word. And, as soon as you insert an in-text reference into word, the full reference will be added to the document’s Reference List section.

The best part is that it updates and syncs. If you decide to remove a section of text, which may have had an in text reference used nowhere else, this reference will automatically be removed from your Reference List too #timesaver.

As a Griffith staff member or student you can download EndNote for free from Griffith’s Software Download Service. Find out more about using EndNote here.


How to keep on top of your referencing

Person writing list

Referencing is a big part of uni. It’s how you clearly and consistently acknowledge all the information sources you have used in your work.

Being such an essential skill, we recommend you become proficient at it.

As an undergraduate student where you’re generally writing shorter assignments (I know, 2000 words isn’t that short – but hey, it’s shorter than a dissertation!) we suggest you use our referencing tool to guide you with your referencing. The referencing tool is designed to provide you with examples of direct quotations, paraphrasing and full references for a range of resources you may have used when researching a topic. Over time you’ll build up your skills in this area, and know what a reference should look like.

As you move towards more lengthy assignments, research papers, and so forth, you may be struggling to stay on top of the massive array of resources you’ve used.

Enter: EndNote.

EndNote is Griffith’s recommended bibliographic management software, and enables you to easily:

  • Collect references
  • Organise references and documents in a searchable library
  • Create instant reference lists and/or bibliographies

It’s super handy if you have a large amount of research you need to organise. You are able to store all the citations in one place, and easily insert them straight into Word. And, as soon as you insert an in-text reference into word, the full reference will be added to the document’s Reference List section.

Best part – it updates. If you decide to remove a section of text, which may have had an in text reference used nowhere else, this reference will automatically be removed from your Reference List too #timesaver.

Ok, another best part. It’s free!

To get EndNote, follow the instructions on the EndNote page to download it.

For more information on referencing, check out our referencing study smart page.

 


What can you do in November to become a better researcher?

better_researcher

You can attend our academic, library and computing skills training for HDR Candidates and Researchers. They are a series of workshops targeted to support you through all stages of the research lifecycle.  Check out the November timetable and book now! Or take a look at the 2016 Semester 2 Workshop Timetable for upcoming training.

Week 14 (31 October – 4 November)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Wed 2/11 1.00 EndNote for Mac (2 hours) Library (N53_1.50) Nathan
Thurs 3/11 10.00 Managing your research data (1.5 hours) Hub Link (L07_3.08) Logan
Fri 4/11 10.00 Managing your resources to begin writing your literature review (1.5 hours) Library (N53_1.51) Nathan

Week 15 (7 November – 11 November)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Tues 8/11 10.00 EndNote for Windows (2 hours) Library (N53_1.50) Nathan
Wed 9/11 10.00 Academic Integrity (1 hour) Library (G10_2.25) Gold Coast
Thurs 10/11 1.00 The writing and editing process (2 hours) Library (G10_2.25) Gold Coast
Fri 11/11 1.00 Get published (1.5 hours) Library (N53_1.49) Nathan

Week 16 (14 November – 18 November)

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Mon 14/11 1.00 EndNote for Mac (2 hours) Library (G10_2.04) Gold Coast
Thurs 17/11 10.00 The writing and editing process (2 hours) Library (N53_1.51) Nathan
Fri 18/11 1.00 Build and leverage your research profile (1.5 hours) Library (G10_2.09) Gold Coast

New to Endnote? Check out these helpful resources

Have you subscribed to Azaria Bell’s YouTube channel yet? If you haven’t, you are missing out! She’s just uploaded a video on how to use Endnote. Check out How to get 100% on academic referencing.

Azaria, a Griffith University business student, started her YouTube channel earlier this year to share her tips and tricks on all things finance, lifestyle and study.

So far this year, she’s talked us through the must-have apps for college students, 10 things you must do before starting university, and how to stay organised (because we all need help with this, right?).

And to help us all celebrate Referencing Week this week, Azaria has just uploaded a video on Endnote. That’s right, it’s just gone up! Thanks Azaria, your video taught us a thing or two about using the popular referencing program.

So why use Endnote? Sure, you could continue to write out references manually (and this is an important skill to learn at university). But EndNote can do it all for you, in just a couple of clicks.

EndNote is Griffith’s recommended bibliographic management software to help you easily:

  • collect references
  • organise references and documents in a searchable library
  • create instant reference lists and/or bibliographies

Did we mention that Endnote is free for all students and staff? You can download Endnote through the SDS on your student Google Drive. Click here for instructions on Accessing the SDS on Google Drive.

Want help using Endnote? The library has workshops, consultations and guides to help you become an Endnote whiz. Here’s what you need to do:

  • Attend an Endnote workshop. The library is offering additional EndNote workshops this semester so you’ll have plenty of opportunities to get hands-on with the referencing software. Why not attend a workshop this week?
  • Book a Consultation with a Library Specialist. Have a tricky Endnote question or just need extra special help with managing your references in Endnote? Get one-on-one assistance with a Library Specialist. Appointments are 20 minutes in length and bookings are required.
  • Check out the Endnote Self Help Guide. It provides links to workshops, getting started guides and videos, as well as Endnote installation instructions.

This Week in the Library – Week 13

this-week-in-the-library

Do you have to conduct a survey? The Online Research Survey Tool may be of use to you! Attend the Online Research Survey Tool (3 hours) session at the Logan campus for a comprehensive tool tutorial.

You will learn how to create and preview an online survey, including topics such as question types, conditions, quotas, tokens and how to activate your survey as well as information on links to associated resources.

Library and Learning Services workshops are FREE and available to all students, HDR candidates, and staff. To view the entire workshop timetable, please visit the Workshops and Training web page.

Higher Degree Research Skills

This series of workshops is targeted to support Higher Degree Candidates through all stages of the research lifecycle. Bookings are required for all HDR workshops.

Date Time Workshop Location Campus
Tues 31/5 10.00 Managing your resources to begin writing your literature review (1.5 hours) Library (G10_2.25) Gold Coast
Wed 1/6 9.30 Online Research Survey Tool (3 hours) Academic 1 (L05_3.03) Logan
Thurs 2/6 10.00 Build and leverage your research profile (1.5 hours) Library (N53_1.49) Nathan
Fri 3/6 10.00 EndNote for Windows (2 hours) Library (G10_2.09) Gold Coast