Get a head start on study by attending our free earlybird workshops

Quick quiz:

  • Are you starting uni this trimester?
  • Did you find last trimester’s study a challenge?
  • Do you want to further develop your learning skills?

If you answered yes to any of the above questions, our free Earlybird workshops are perfect for you!

Prior to Trimester 1, 2019, we are offering the following Earlybird workshops free to Griffith students:

Strategies for study at university (2 hrs)

This workshop introduces you to university culture and expectations, and covers strategies for managing your time and studying effectively.

Gold Coast: Mon 11 February, 10.00 am – G17 Lecture Theatre 4
Nathan: Tues 12 February, 10.00 am – N18 Central Theatre 1

Writing university assignments (2 hrs)

This workshop covers the basics of getting started, structuring and writing assignments.

Nathan: Wed 13 February, 9.30 am – N18 Central Theatre 1
Gold Coast: 
Wed 13 February, 10.00 am – G17 Lecture Theatre 4
Mt Gravatt: Mon 18 February, 9.30 am – M23 Auditorium
South Bank: Tues 19 February, 9.30 am – S05 Lecture Theatre and Gallery
Logan: Thurs 21 February, 9.30 am – L08 Lecture Theatre 2

Getting started on an ePortfolio with PebblePad (45 mins)

Learn about Griffith’s personal learning environment – PebblePad. Don’t forget your login details and a device!

Nathan: Wed 13 February, 11.45 am – N18 Central Theatre 1
Gold Coast: 
Wed 13 February, 1.00 pm – G03 Lecture Theatre 1
Mt Gravatt: Mon 18 February, 11.45 am – M23 Auditorium
South Bank: Tues 19 February, 11.45 am – S05 Lecture Theatre and Gallery
Logan: Thurs 21 February, 11.45 am – L08 Lecture Theatre 2

Researching and referencing for your assignments (2 hrs)

Gain awareness of the wide range of information resources available at Griffith and learn to identify the principles of referencing and the process of applying them within academic work.

Nathan: Wed 13 February, 1.30 pm – N18 Central Theatre 1
Gold Coast: 
Wed 13 February, 2.00 pm – G03 Lecture Theatre 1
Mt Gravatt: Mon 18 February, 1.30 pm – M23 Auditorium
South Bank: Tues 19 February, 1.30 pm – S05 Lecture Theatre and Gallery
Logan: Thurs 21 February, 1.30 pm – L08 Lecture Theatre 2


How to boost your postgrad research skills

 

A little extra help goes a long way in the world of researching, more specifically higher degree research, and we want your work to have impact!

The Research and Publishing webpage covers all your researching needs and assists with getting started, managing your research and of course, getting published.

The webpage covers topics such as:

Free workshops on topics like publishing during your PhD, EndNote, developing your academic argument, editing your writing, managing your research data and many more.

  • Postgraduate Research Information Skills Modules designed to guide you through every stage of your research journey.
  • Strategic publishing guidelines that show you where to get published, how to get published and how to reach the widest audience.
  • How to measure your academic impact using citation performance indicators and altmetrics.
  • Best practice data guidelines.
  • Plus much more.

Are you a Higher Degree Research student and need assisting with a specific research need? You can book a free consultation with a specialist Librarian for support. Just scroll on down to ‘Consultations with a Specialist’ on the Research and Publishing webpage.


Need help with research and publishing?

Griffith University Library is here to help you fly into your research!

We’ve created a Research and Publishing webpage to assist you through this process. The Research and Publishing webpage covers everything from getting started on your research journey to getting published and attaining academic impact.

You’ll find links to:

  • Free workshops on topics like EndNote, developing your academic argument, editing your writing, managing your research data, publishing during your PhD and many more.
  • Postgraduate Research Information Skills Modules designed to guide you through every stage of your research journey.
  • Strategic publishing guidelines to assist you through publishing.
  • Academic impact resources.
  • Best practice data guidelines.
  • Plus much more.

Remember, Griffith Library is here to help you succeed in your research. Need more help? If you’re a Higher Degree Research candidate or academic you can book in for a free consultation with a specialist Discipline Librarian to assist you with your research specific information needs.


Get a head start on study by attending our earlybird workshops

Quick quiz:

  • Are you starting uni this trimester?
  • Did you find last trimester’s study a challenge?
  • Do you want to further develop your learning skills?

If you answered yes to any of the above questions, our free Earlybird workshops are perfect for you!

During O Week for Trimester 2, 2018, we are offering the following Earlybird workshops free to Griffith students:

Writing university assignments

This workshop covers the basics of getting started, structuring and writing assignments.

Gold Coast: Wed 4 July, 9.30 am – G16 Lecture Theatre 1
Logan: Thurs 5 July, 9.30 am – L08 Lecture Theatre 2
Nathan: Thurs 5 July, 9.30 am – N18 Central Theatre 1

Getting started on an ePortfolio with PebblePad

Learn about Griffith’s personal learning environment – PebblePad. Don’t forget your login details and a device!

Gold Coast: Wed 4 July, 11.45 am – G16 Lecture Theatre 1
Logan: Thurs 5 July, 11.45 am – L08 Lecture Theatre 2
Nathan: Thurs 5 July, 11.45 am – N18 Central Theatre 1

Researching and referencing for your assignments

Gain awareness of the wide range of information resources available at Griffith and learn to identify the principles of referencing and the process of applying them within academic work.

Gold Coast: Wed 4 July, 1.30 pm – G16 Lecture Theatre 1
Logan: Thurs 5 July, 1.30 pm – L08 Lecture Theatre 2
Nathan: Thurs 5 July, 1.30 pm – N18 Central Theatre 1


Keep your writing on track with a storyboard

Have you ever spent ages researching, only to run out of time or lose sight of the overall picture by the time you are ready to write your assignment?

Could it be that your literature review has taken too long to finalise or your research has moved away from the core of the assignment question?

If you are collaborating with other students, maybe your group members have unknowingly moved their focus. You realise the deadline is looming and you need to present your supervisor or lecturer with a coherent ‘story’.

This is where storyboarding can be of assistance when used from the beginning of your work.

Storyboarding basically comprises laying out the structure of your assignment, before starting to write it. Doing this helps you to capture, organise and compile your thoughts and research, as well as structure your work, right from the beginning.

There are a variety of tools you can use to storyboard your writing.

Scrivener has a free trial and can be purchased for a cheaper subscription if you are a student or academic with an institutional affiliation.

For people who like sticky notes/corkboards,  the free Index Cards tool is available on Windows. A similar app called Index Card 4 is downloadable for a small fee on your iPhone and iPad. If you use both Mac OS and iOS devices, Index Card 4 can also sync projects with the Scrivener app for Mac, making it easy to capture ideas on your iPhone/iPad while on the run and sync them with your Mac computer later.

There are many more apps available. Have a look at this recent  teachthought blog post for a list of 11 storyboarding apps for writers.


Your guide to easily writing your assignment

You’ve unpacked the topic, gathered information, and now you’re ready to write your assignment.

Have you been staring at an empty Word document for 30 minutes, trying to come up with a good opening sentence while The Pixies’ Where is my mind? runs through your pained brain? Then it’s definitely time to check out our guide on writing your assignment. We’ll get you started!

Step 1

Work out what type of assignment you are writing. Is it a report, essay, reflective piece or literature review? If you’re not sure, take another look at your assignment information or check with your lecturer/tutor. This information will help inform your layout and influence your content.

Literature reviews, reports and reflective pieces all vary in terms of content and layout, so take a look at our guides to ensure you know what to include and focus on.

Most academic writing follows a similar structure. You’ll need an introduction, body, and conclusion. The writing your assignment guide provides a detailed overview of what to include in and how to structure each individual section.

Step 2

Start by creating a rough outline of your structure, noting down what you intend to include in each section. Try using dot-points under headings to highlight key information. Revisit your notes from researching your topic as this can also help you determine which sections you may need to research more. Look, your empty word document now reflects some hard work.

Step 3

Time to start writing. Just get your initial ideas down and begin filling in the sections you’ve mapped out, using our guides to help with content. Once you have written a paragraph or more, go back and begin polishing your work by adding some academic words you have learnt during your studies.

When you’re done, don’t forget to proofread! It always helps to get somebody else to look over your assignment too, as they may catch things you have missed. Don’t neglect your reference list – it needs to be proofread too!


Got an assignment to do? Here’s how to get started

1. Unpack the question

The first step to getting your assignment done is to understand what you need to do. You need to pull your assignment question apart to figure out how to put an answer together that will score you top marks.

So how do you analyse an assignment question? Follow the four simple steps on our preparing for your assignment webpage.

2. Research

Now you know what you need to be focusing on, it’s time to start researching. Not sure where to begin? Check out our online modules on:

3. Write

Once all your research is done, (sorry, but it is inevitable) you’ve got to start writing. No, that doesn’t mean staring at an open word document for an hour, typing in a title, saving the document and returning to Reddit. You’ve actually got to start writing. Trust us, the sooner you start, the better you’ll feel. Future you will thank past you. Then current you can thank us ;).

We’ve got an online guide to writing your assignments. Not sure where to start? Use the online guide and plan out your assignment structure in the word document. Then you can save it with a title and a structure. We’ll high-five to that.

4. Reference

Once you’ve powered through the writing process–probably with the aid of coffee or Red Bull, and possibly with a few Netflix or stress breaks–it’s time to ensure all your work is referenced properly and to give it a good proof read.

Check out our referencing webpage to get on top of your referencing, and take a look at our referencing tool to make sure your citations are structured correctly.