Are you following us on Instagram?

Griffith Library Instagram feed

We’ve seen some of you over on the @griffithlibrary Instagram, and we appreciate all your likes and comments. Fist bump to all our regulars!

But for those of you who aren’t familiar with our feed, maybe now’s the time to take a peek. You can see pics from our fabulous library events, like the recent weekend Hack-a-thon at the Gold Coast.

And it’s not just photos – we’ve dabbled with mini video content such as Boomerang and Instagram Stories. Check out the Boomerang of our massive Hack-a-thon cheque. Cool, right?

While we aim to keep you up-to-date with all the latest library resources and services, we also like to have a little fun on Insta. Okay, so maybe a lot of fun.

We keep you entertained with humorous, motivational or inspirational quotes, like the one we posted recently by Timothy Healy.

There’s also our semi-regular #bookfacefriday posts. Because who doesn’t enjoy seeing how creative some folk can be with their face, a book cover, and a mobile phone? Here’s one we posted a few days ago.

And as much as you’ll flip over the #bookfacefriday posts, you’ll love our behind-the-scenes snaps of our beloved library staff and lovely library spaces even more. Don’t you just dig this shot of one of our more colourful staff members?

Head over to Insta and scroll through the @griffithlibrary feed. If you like what you see, be sure to give us a Follow.


Meet your library staff: Rhiannon Reid

Our library staff are integral to the functioning of our libraries. We have a large array of staff spread over our five campus libraries and they’re much more than just smiling faces. They’re also full of interesting information, helpful wisdom, and some quirks here and there.

Want to get to know our staff better? Check out our profile on Library and Learning Services Team Member, Rhiannon Reid.

Quick overview

  • Find me at: Library front desk QCGU, or “behind the scenes” throwing together folders for Music Issue.
  • What I do: Mostly printing/lending queries but I have on occasion played therapist, disciplinarian, and, awkwardly, alarm clock, waking up kids who fall asleep on beanbags.
  • My Griffith story: I started at Griffith in 2014 and have been lucky enough to stick around ever since. During that time I’ve worked across several campuses, and on several challenging projects. As my first out of uni job, it has taught me a lot and been very eye-opening.

Steal Rhiannon’s wisdom

  • Best study tip for students: Find someone you trust to proofread. Typos hapen to godd people way too often…
  • Biggest blunder I see – and how to avoid: Typos. See above. .
  • Advice I’d give my 18-year-old self: Put down the eyeliner, you are NOT as cool as you think you are. Also, be nicer to your mother. And don’t get so stressed about having no idea what you want to do with your life. Hot tip, in 10 years you’ll still be unsure. But at least you won’t have so much eyeliner on and you’re being nicer to your mother.
  • Best thing I’ve learnt working at Griffith Uni: It is possible to enjoy the work environment you spend hours in. Several of my colleagues have been some of the kindest and most generous to me during some of the hardest times of my life.

Get to know Rhiannon

  • Describe yourself in three words: Creative, avid reader
  • Growing up I wanted to be: An actor (those Year 3 drama lessons pay off on the front desk A LOT) and/or a writer. But mostly Buffy the Vampire Slayer.
  • Greatest accomplishment: TBA
  • Fun fact: I wrote this whole thing with an Ed Sheeran song stuck in my head. I wonder if it shows…

Human Library: Don’t judge a book by its cover

Don't judge a book by its cover

We are hosting a Human Library at the Nathan campus library at 12 pm on Wednesday 24 May 2017. You can take a person out on loan for a conversation on the topic/issue that they represent.

About the Human Library

Human Libraries are all around the world! They are much more than an ‘event’ – they are about providing a space to enable social and cultural connection between people while recognising our differences.

We want people to share their stories with each other: we believe that conversations can help spark social change!

The Human Books will be available in a safe conversational space in the library. Difficult questions are expected, appreciated and hopefully answered by the book on loan.

Our collection of Human Books

The Griffith University Human Library collection is quite diverse. Check out our selection of Human Books:

  •   Homeless
  •   Refugee
  •   Adopted
  •   Widow
  •   Muslim Woman
  •   Muslim Man/POW/PTSD
  •   Lesbian/Muso
  •   Gay male
  •   Maori
  •   Indigenous
  •   Women in IT (WIT)
  •   Veteran and Assistance Dog
  •   Author
  •   Tattoos
  •   Dreadlocks

Reserve a Human Book

Bookings are now open. Get in quick so you don’t miss out! Reserve your Human Books today.

Borrowing rules

You are responsible for all the Human Books you borrow. Be sure to follow the Human Library borrowing rules:

  •   All of our books are in mint condition. We expect them to be returned in the same condition.
  •   Do not tear out pages or write notes in our books.
  •   Loans are personal and may not be handed over to other readers.
  •   Your book is a reference for information on a given topic. So you need to ask about the things that you want to know.
  •   Be respectful.

Event details

Time: 12pm – 1.15pm
Date: Wednesday 24 May 2017
Location: Library (N53), Nathan Campus, Griffith University


Roll up, roll up, and get Microsoft 365 for free!

Photo of a carnival

Don’t go paying to download and install Microsoft 365 on your personal device. As a Griffith University student you get access to Microsoft 365 for Education for free.

Enrolled Griffith students can download Office 365 for Education directly from Microsoft and install it on up to five PCs or Macs and mobile devices, including Android, iPad, and Windows tablets.

Microsoft 365 for Education includes:

Basically, all the Microsoft products you need to succeed in your studies.

So, how do you actually download and install this software? Simple!

Go to the Microsoft Office website, type in your Griffith email address, and click get started. Then follow the prompts to download onto your personal device.

However, the freebies don’t stop here! Once it’s installed, you can access free training to learn how to use the products or improve your existing skills.

There’s also a super handy Student Resources centre where you can access an array of templates to make putting your document together easier, blogs with handy tips and interesting information, and training.


Check out our Library Twitter

Library Twitter

Us library staff like to think we’re a little hip (we’re not all cats and cups of tea, you know). And, even though we may not always be, our Twitter certainly is.

Yep, our Twitter. In case you didn’t already know, Griffith library is on Twitter. And most other major social media, too: FacebookInstagram, our wonderful blogs like this one.

Just like you use different social media for different things, so do we. While our library blog here is full of useful (and fun!) information which may go into a little more depth, our Twitter page is great for getting a quick snapshot of info. And it’s awash with funny gifs too!

So, if you’re a fellow Twitter user – come on over and follow us. Like us, retweet us, do all the twitter stuff! Or just follow our page quietly. Really, it’s your choice.  

And if you’re not a Twitter user, why not consider joining? It’s a great way to stay on top of information!


How to keep on top of your referencing

Person writing list

Referencing is a big part of uni. It’s how you clearly and consistently acknowledge all the information sources you have used in your work.

Being such an essential skill, we recommend you become proficient at it.

As an undergraduate student where you’re generally writing shorter assignments (I know, 2000 words isn’t that short – but hey, it’s shorter than a dissertation!) we suggest you use our referencing tool to guide you with your referencing. The referencing tool is designed to provide you with examples of direct quotations, paraphrasing and full references for a range of resources you may have used when researching a topic. Over time you’ll build up your skills in this area, and know what a reference should look like.

As you move towards more lengthy assignments, research papers, and so forth, you may be struggling to stay on top of the massive array of resources you’ve used.

Enter: EndNote.

EndNote is Griffith’s recommended bibliographic management software, and enables you to easily:

  • Collect references
  • Organise references and documents in a searchable library
  • Create instant reference lists and/or bibliographies

It’s super handy if you have a large amount of research you need to organise. You are able to store all the citations in one place, and easily insert them straight into Word. And, as soon as you insert an in-text reference into word, the full reference will be added to the document’s Reference List section.

Best part – it updates. If you decide to remove a section of text, which may have had an in text reference used nowhere else, this reference will automatically be removed from your Reference List too #timesaver.

Ok, another best part. It’s free!

To get EndNote, follow the instructions on the EndNote page to download it.

For more information on referencing, check out our referencing study smart page.

 


Tips to improve your time management

What do Charles Darwin, Abraham Lincoln, and Sigmund Freud have in common? Well, apart from being dead… They’re all great at time management.

Time management is a key factor to a balanced life – and, academic success.

For example, if you start your assignment the night before, chances are (a) you’re not gonna get a HD, and (b) you’re not great at time management. And, I’ll guess you probably spent the week beforehand stressing about the assignment a little? (#notfun) 

Below, we’ve compiled a list of time management tips to help you stay on top of things and avoid turning into a stress-head.

Plan things early
Have an assignment due in three weeks, or an exam coming up? Start two to three weeks beforehand. By working incrementally on the assignment, you’ll feel better knowing it’s started, and will surprise yourself with the progress you make! Stick the dates in your calendar, and maybe even include deadlines for progress.

Write a to-do list
Get your task list out of your brain and onto a piece of paper. But make sure it’s attainable. You’re not going to finish 10 separate readings and write the introduction, methodology, and discussion of an assignment piece all in one day. Be realistic, and space it out. This will help you achieve goals and stay on track, plus ticking off an item always feels good.

Prioritise your work
Complete the most pressing tasks first. Yes, you may need to buy a Fathers Day present eventually, but it can probably wait until after you’ve finished your class readings for the week.

Take a break
All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy (it’s a proverb, look it up). Don’t spend all your time studying, you’ll go mad. Take a break, got outside. Sunlight’s always good. Or check out our post on movies to take a break to. But don’t start watching 13 Reasons Why in your break, because trust us, you won’t stop.