How to find funding for your research

Are you looking for a grant, fellowship, scholarship, or award to fund your research? There is a myriad of grant opportunities open to Griffith researchers, ranging from internal grant schemes to external funding.

Check out the Griffith University, Office for Research, Funding Opportunities website to keep on top of upcoming prospects.

You can also access the Research Professional grants database. It’s an online database of research funding opportunities and a source of international research policy and practice news.

If you set up a personal profile in Research Professional, you can receive automatic email alerts from the database. You can also create a personal funding opportunities calendar, save popular searches and see details of past awards from a number of funders.

The database allows you to manage and distribute funding opportunities to your Centre, Institute or Group. Discipline specific funding opportunities can be managed for distribution to members through saved searches, newsletter creation and calendar updates.

Simply, nominate a staff member to manage the membership and generate the tailored content via defined searches.

Need help? The Office for Research, Funding Opportunities website has resources which show you how to navigate Research Professional, locate funding opportunities and set up email alerts.

The Office for Research also provides specific local training for Centres, Institutes and Groups. Contact Joanne Biles or Rhiannon Campbell to organise a training session.

Have a look at the Research Professional grants database today.


Kick start your study success by attending an earlybird workshop

Quick quiz:

  • Are you starting uni this trimester?
  • Did you find last trimester’s study a challenge?
  • Do you want to further develop your learning skills?

If you answered yes to any of the above questions, our earlybird workshops are perfect for you!

Prior to Trimester 2, 2017, we are offering the following earlybird workshops free to Griffith students:

Strategies for study at university
Get an overview of university culture and expectations, and learn some helpful strategies for managing your time and studying effectively. Beginning the trimester with a head start on study and time management will make a world of difference, we promise!

Writing university assignments
Does your assignment writing process involve opening a new word document, and staring at an empty page for 30 minutes trying to come up with an opening sentence? Don’t let assignments get the better of you! This workshop will cover the basics of getting started on structuring and writing assignments, and will help prepare you to smash the next assignment you get!

Researching and Referencing for your assignments
Being able to research and reference is a kinda crucial part of uni. If this seems daunting, come along to this workshop. You’ll gain awareness of the wide range of information resources available at Griffith and learn to identify the principles of referencing and the process of applying them within academic work.

Check out the times, dates, and locations, come along to a workshop, and start trimester two prepared for success!


How classical music can help with study

How much do you know about study techniques?

Hopefully, you’ve taken a look at our Study Smart tutorial on exam prep, listened to your lecturer’s advice, and maybe even organised a study group.

But what else can you do to ensure that you are studying as effectively and efficiently as you can?

Well, research shows that listening to classical music helps.

Dosseville, Laborde and Scelles’ paper Music during lectures: Will students learn better?, published in the Learning and Individual Differences journal, found that students who listened to a one-hour videotaped lecture in which classical music was played in the background performed much higher on a multiple choice test given after the lecture, in comparison to a control group of academically equal students who had listened to the lecture without classical music. 

The researchers speculated that classical music puts students in a heightened emotional state, therefore making them more receptive to information, and influenced their motivation to remain focused.

Research has also shown that listening to classical music can reduce anxiety and help with relaxation. In addition, listening to classical music (and rock music!) can increase cognitive ability.

So turn on some Tchaikovsky, blast some Beethoven, listen to some Liszt, and study away!


How to improve your study skills

Photo of study station

Study skills are essential to academic success.

But there are oh so many facets: critical thinking, time management, reading effectively, effective note taking, assignment preparation, assignment writing, referencing, exam preparation…

Wouldn’t it be great if there was a guide to all this? With strategies and resources designed to help you succeed in your studies?

Oh, lucky – there is!

The library’s study skills page is full of self-help resources to help you achieve academic success.

To start off, you can take an interactive tutorial on preparing for university, and learn to maximise your study time through tips on critical thinking, time management, reading effectively, and effective note taking.

Now we’re getting to the gritty end of the trimester, you might find our tutorials on preparing for your assignment and writing your assignment super handy. Trust us, good preparation and planning will make writing your assignment so much easier (give it a shot!).

We’ve also got tips to help you become a referencing guru. Almost all assessment pieces have dedicated marks for referencing, so it’s worth taking the time to get good at referencing.

And with the exam block looming, we recommend you take a look at our information on exam preparation to help you ace exams.

There are even tips on improving your social media skills. I know, you’re a millennial, what can we teach you that you don’t already know, right? But check it out, you might learn a thing a two. Like how to use social media to help land a job.


Fighting malaria

Mosquitos are not just annoying, they are also dangerous and can bring all sorts of devastating diseases as well. One of those is malaria, a disease that kills many people around the world.

25 April is World Malaria Day and Griffith researchers are working on the case to defeat it.

Want to know what Griffith researchers have done so far?

Our key researchers in the field include Professor Michael Good, Professor Vicky Avery, Dr Leonardo Lucantoni, Professor Sally-Ann Poulsen and Professor Katherine Andrews.

You can view journal articles the researchers have published on the Griffith Experts site. This can be a great way for you to find journal articles written by your lecturers and maybe improve your marks.

Type “Michael Good” in the search box, and you can see the Professor’s publications to see what work he has done so far.

Here are a few activities promoting World Malaria Day:

Malaria Day Luncheon Event

  1. 26 April
  2. N75
  3. Proceeds donated to Rotary Against Malaria for the purchase of bed-nets.  Everyone donating/purchasing lunch will receive a ‘peg’ mosquito to pin on a the symbolic bed-net!
  4. RSVP: Leo, l.lucantoni@griffith.edu.au

Outreach Packs

  1. Packs contain educational material/activities designed to educate and engage children (8-12 years) with activities that include find-a-word, cross-words, a maze and colouring in pages.

Online Quiz

  1. “How much do you know about malaria?” is a 25 question online quiz designed to educate as well as capture information about current knowledge on malaria and malaria prevention.

Build a mosquito competition

  1. Fancy your craft skills can build a mosquito?  Give it a go and share on social media to raise awareness of malaria and its prevention.

More books for borrowing? Bonus!

Woman looking through binoculars

Searched our Griffith library catalogue like a pro and still can’t find the book you’re after? If that’s the case, how about trying BONUS+?

If you haven’t heard of BONUS+ before, that’s OK – a lot of people haven’t. But it’s certainly worth taking a look at (trust us, we’re librarians, we know books!).

BONUS+ is a resource sharing project that Griffith University staff and students can use to request books from participating University libraries in Australia and New Zealand.

If the book you need is not held at any of our Griffith University Libraries or is out on loan, you can request it online from another BONUS+ library and collect it a few days later from your selected pickup location.

“How do I access this service?” you ask. Simple:

  • Search the library catalogue 
  • Click the Menu icon (it’s three horizontal lines at the top right)
  • Select Can’t find that book? BONUS+ (look for the little green button!)
  • Search for the book you want in the BONUS+ catalogue
  • Select Request this item if the book is available at a BONUS+ library
  • Select Griffith University
  • Click Submit above information
  • Enter your Griffith username and password
  • Choose your Pickup Location
  • Click Submit

Check out our BONUS+ webpage for information on how to access the service, as well as what you can can borrow and for how long.


Save time researching by using our subject guides

Photo of heavy metal band

Iron Maiden are heavy metal like the music, not the elements…

Are you finding that researching for your assignment takes ages? Like, longer than the wait for the new season of Game of Thrones to be released?

Wouldn’t it be such a great time-saver if all the databases and resources for your study area were in one, easily accessible place?

Well, they are. Our discipline librarians have worked hard to compile all the databases and key information resources you’ll need for your subject area into one centralised area. Just go to the Borrowing and Resources library page, and select your subject area under Library guides.  

You can select a broad area, such as Health, to see all relevant databases. Or you can further narrow your selection to a specific discipline area, such as Nursing and Midwifery for more detailed information.

Using the resources in these subject guides can help ensure you’re finding information relevant to your specific subject area.

For example, if you were wanting to find information on the chemistry of heavy metals, you’d take a squiz at the Chemistry guide. However, if you wanted to find information on the musical genre of heavy metal, you’d want to be looking at the Music guide.