Improve your research and publishing skills!

Are you a research student?

Yes, while the undergrads are away on trimester vacay, you’re working hard on your research each day.

It’s a hard life. But you’re committed. And future you (who’s widely published and likely adorned with quite a few extra letters at the end of your name) will look back and thank you.

Speaking of being committed, have you taken a look at our Postgrad Research Information Skills Modules?

Designed to help you navigate your way through the research cycle, the modules have been grouped into three sections: Discover, Manage and Publish.

The modules provide you with strategies, resources and interactive learning activities to enable you to successfully complete your project.

Discover how to develop a your research question, find the literature you need, and use the literature.

Manage your organisation or citations and references, ensure you maintain research integrity, manage your research data effectively, and learn about author profiles.

Then – ahhh the culmination of all your hard work – Publish. Learn how to select a journal, submit a manuscript, and navigate the peer review, revising and editing processes. Explore collaboration options and how to use social media to expand your readership and altmetric score. Learn about scholarly impact of your publication. Then – go at it again! Find resources to help with getting funding for future research!


Get some research insight

Are you a budding researcher? Want to know about latest news on innovation, technology, library resources, online tools, social media trends, research and workshops?

Well, then you definitely want to check out our Insight newsletter. It’s a monthly newsletter aimed at our Griffith researchers, full of interesting and enlightening information.

Learn more about our research staff by reading the monthly academic profile. Or stay up to date with the latest research workshops and training.

Maybe you want to further develop your research skills, and would like to check our posts such as What is a good research question and How to measure scholarly impact with a donut, expand your knowledge base and learn Why we can’t trust our brains, or have some fun with 6 of the best photo editing apps for mobile devices.

You can subscribe to the Insight newsletter, as well as view past editions here.


Lightning Talks is Real Speak

For those of you who weren’t among the sixty plus audience members at last week’s Lightning Talks in the Nathan Campus library – have no fear, we’ve got you covered!

So what are Lightning Talks?
Lightning Talks are similar to soapbox events or Speakers’ Corner in Hyde Park, London, where speakers give voice to a variety of topical issues and invite discussion on current affairs.

Our academics and professional experts are invited to talk for 10 minutes to talk about their work in relation to a theme, and then the audience is invited to ask questions.

Why do we hold these talks?

We are hoping to make research and ideas more accessible, removing the stigma of ‘ivory towers’, breaking down hierarchical divisions. Lightning Talks are an extension of Griffith University’s commitment to inclusivity, and bringing disciplines together.

Our speakers for #LightningTalks3 were:

Associate Professor Georgina Murray who kicked off the talks with her discussion centring on socio-political changes occurring in the world, and the effects of neoliberal political ideology, particularly around employment. She highlighted some shocking statistics about the casualisation of the Australian labour force with some of the societal ramifications being drug addiction, financial insecurity around obtaining home loans, and a lack of sick leave. So do companies like Uber break up monopolies of power or do they further contribute to marginalisation and disenfranchisement in our turbulent times?

Dr Duncan McDonnell discussed the rise of right-wing populism internationally and compared Australia’s One Nation with the more successful right-wing populists in Western Europe. He highlighted that right-wing populism is not historically new; we just rename it to go with the current time period. And whilst Donald Trump does not conform to the populist leader ideal; it must be acknowledged how his controversial nature got him elected once, and he can be again! Across the Atlantic, populist parties in Europe do well because unlike their mainstream counterparts, they focus on grassroots community engagement.

Dr Susanna Chamberlain started with asking the question, ‘What the heck is populism?’ and then led us on a journey that linked anthropology and history to binaries around populism. Populism, it appears, is about the leader’s’ ability to identify as the ‘common person’ aka ‘we are just like you’ ideal; however, that idea is often a misnomer as one might suspect with Donald Trump’s empire building — funded by a ‘small’ loan of a million dollars from his father– that hardly mirrors the average ‘common person’s’ start in life.

Mr John Tague, Griffith Review Managing Editor, brought his experience and knowledge as an international journalist to discuss changes in journalistic reporting and political writing. Griffith Review, a compilation of long form essays, engages its audience and reinvigorates the idea that not everything can – or should – be conveyed in 140 character Tweets. Brexit, Trump and right-wing European leaders regularly take to the mediasphere, often invoking moral panic by circulating narratives about alleged racial tensions, scientific knowledges, and rise of ‘fake news’ in the post- truth politics era.

For the full story, listen here.

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Research online with eBooks

It’s that time of trimester. We’re sure you’re all buckling down, and working hard on all your upcoming assignments (not procrastinating and watching Netflix, right?).

You’re probably doing quite a bit of research, and while our libraries are wonderful places, we get that sometimes you’d rather be at home.

This is where our eResources come in handy! We have an array of journal articles and eBooks that you can access from home to help you with your research.

You can search for journal articles, databases, eBooks, and more by clicking inside the library catalogue and filtering the search parameters.

While we have eResources for all disciplines, we have recently enabled access to over 8 900 new titles published from 2015 to 2017 in the following Springer Collections:

  • Biomedical and Life Sciences
  • Engineering
  • Computer Science
  • Medicine

To access these specific eBooks, simply:

  • Jump onto the library website
  • Click inside the library catalogue, to filter the search to books on the left hand side, and then electronic only from the drop down menu
  • Type in your search terms in the main text field. Use the keywords “springer”, and one of the collection names names listed above, for example “engineering” and start browsing.

Happy researching!


How EndNote can help with referencing

Overwhelmed by referencing?

Referencing is an essential skill to have as a uni student.

We know, it can be pedantic: where to italicise, where to put a comma (wait, was it a comma, or a full stop?!), whether to capatalise or not….

When you start out, we recommend you use our Referencing Tool. This will help you get the hang of referencing, and what your citation should look like.

But you may get to the stage where you’re writing extensive literature reviews or maybe even a research thesis. Where you can reference APA and AGPS Harvard off the top of your head (a skill I have mastered, and am a little too proud of). At this point manually referencing can become tedious and inefficient.

If you’re at this point and haven’t already heard of EndNote, you probably want to take a look at it.

EndNote is Griffith’s recommended bibliographic management software, and can be used to easily:

  • Collect references
  • Organise references and documents in a searchable library
  • Create instant reference lists and/or bibliographies  

It’s super handy if you have a large amount of research you need to organise. You are able to store all the citations in one place, and easily insert them straight into Word. And, as soon as you insert an in-text reference into word, the full reference will be added to the document’s Reference List section.

The best part is that it updates and syncs. If you decide to remove a section of text, which may have had an in text reference used nowhere else, this reference will automatically be removed from your Reference List too #timesaver.

As a Griffith staff member or student you can download EndNote for free from Griffith’s Software Download Service. Find out more about using EndNote here.


Using stats and need some last minute help… STAT?

Do you need to analyse stats in your classes this semester? SAGE can help get you over the line with that final assignment or upcoming exam.
With exams just around the corner, you may need all the help you can get (because of course you pre-planned your whole semester and don’t need any extra help… right?).

Even if you’re not currently studying stats, but statistical analysis really floats your boat (no judgement from us), this is a great tool to help you further develop your skills.

SAGE Research Methods Datasets is a collection of datasets to support independent learning of data analysis skills. They are particularly useful for practicing quantitative and qualitative analytical methods used in the social sciences.

The datasets are obtained from real research projects, but edited and cleaned for teaching purposes and usability.

Each dataset is accompanied by a short and clear description of the data, and easy to follow instructions on how to apply the research method.

SAGE also has a range of accompanying tools to support the use of these datasets. Some particularly helpful tools are:

  • Methods Map: you can explore the research methods terrain, read definitions of key terminology, and discover content relevant to your research methods journey.
  • Project Planner: this tool helps you plan out and progress through the stages of your research project. When you click on the link to the stage you are at it will give you a breakdown of the components of the stage, with links to further readings.
  • Which Stats Test: this tool helps you to narrow down the range of options for statistical testing though answering a series of questions, and help you decide on the most pertinent test for to use for your project.

Take a look at the SAGE Research Methods website for further tools and information


Save time researching by using our Library Guides

Are you finding that researching for your assignment takes ages? There’s just so many resources available in the library and you are spending valuable time trying to find the right ones.

Wouldn’t it be such a great time-saver if all the databases and resources for your study area were in one, easily accessible place?

Well, they are.  Our discipline librarians have worked hard to compile all the databases and key information resources you’ll need for your subject area into one centralised area. Check out their carefully curated Library Guides!

To find them, head to the Borrowing and Resources library page. You’ll see the wide range of subjects covered by our Library Guides – from criminology and law to humanities, social sciences and languages, we are pretty sure we’ve got something for everyone.

You can select a broad area, such as Health, to see all relevant databases. Or you can further narrow your selection to a specific discipline area, such as Nursing and Midwifery for more detailed information.

Using the resources in these subject guides can help ensure you’re finding information relevant to your specific subject area.

For example, if you were wanting to find information on the chemistry of heavy metals, you’d take a squiz at the Chemistry guide. However, if you wanted to find information on the musical genre of heavy metal, you’d want to be looking at the Music guide.