It’s Library Week: Time to appreciate your Griffith Library!

Do you know what this week is? Well, aside from being the week season 8 of Archer is released on Netflix and second-last teaching week of the trimester, it’s Library and Information Week!

Library and Information Week is all about raising the profile of libraries and information service professionals in Australia and showcasing the resources, facilities, events and services we have to offer.

While we know our students appreciate our libraries, we thought we’d take this opportunity to remind you just how wonderful we are. We’ve got:

Events

We’re often hosting fun events, like the HackathonMusic in the Library and our recent Human Library. In fact, we’re even running a Library Week competition. This year’s Library and Information Week theme is find yourself in a library. Well, we want you to find the Millennium Falcon in our library! Follow the online clues and win a $50 Event Cinemas gift card.

Resources

We have books, a lot of books. And computers so you can check your MyGriffith, access online databases, use software, and—let’s be honest—probably check your social media. You can even borrow a laptop.

But that’s just the physical. Our library website is full of helpful resources such as the library catalogue (a must) and study tips.

Facilities

We’ve got myriad facilities including quiet and social study zones, computer labs, toilets (yeah, they’re kind of a necessity) and bookable group study rooms

Did you know we even got Google to come and film our libraries? You can actually take a virtual tour of our libraries. If you haven’t checked it out, you should (it’s pretty cool).

And good news for you, our libraries will soon be open extended hours for study and exam weeks! Check out our opening hours here.

Services

You’ll find friendly staff behind all our library desks (why not check out their online profiles?). They are there to help you with any library questions you may have. 

Not in the library? No worries. You can also call (07 3735 5555 for Brisbane or 07 5552 5555 for Gold Coast), email, chat us, or ask a question online.


Did you know we’re on Twitter, too?

Us library staff like to think we’re a little hip (we’re not all cats and cups of tea, you know). And, even though we may not always be hip, our Twitter certainly is.

Yep, our Twitter. In case you didn’t already know, Griffith library is on Twitter. And most other major social media, too: FacebookInstagram and our wonderful blogs like this one.

Just like you use different social media for different things, so do we. While our library blog here is full of useful (and fun!) information which may go into a little more depth, our Twitter page is great for getting a quick snapshot of info. And it’s awash with funny gifs too!

So, if you’re a fellow Twitter user–come on over and follow us. Like us, retweet us, do all the Twitter stuff! Or just follow our page quietly. Really, it’s your choice.

And if you’re not a Twitter user, why not consider joining? It’s a great way to stay on top of information!


Library opening hours for Labour Day

Zoe Fraser

It’s Labour Day on Monday! Labour Day ‘is an annual public holiday that celebrates the eight-hour working day, a victory for workers in the mid-late 19th century. The argument for the eight-hour day was based on the need for each person to have eight hours labour, eight hours recreation, and eight hours rest’ (Public Holidays, 2018).

Though it may be a public holiday for you, our libraries will still be open if you feel like taking the opportunity to catch up on some study! Hours will be shorter though, so be sure to check the library opening hours for your campus library before you come to visit:

  Monday 7 May
Gold Coast  10 am – 5 pm
Logan  12 pm – 5 pm
Mt Gravatt  12 pm – 5 pm
Nathan  10 am – 5 pm
QCA  9 am – 1 pm
QCGU  1 pm – 5 pm

Library hours for the ANZAC Day public holiday

It’s ANZAC Day on Wednesday! Celebrated on 25 April each year, the public holiday commemorates ‘all Australians who served and died in war and on operational service’ (Australian War Memorial).

Library opening hours have changed for ANZAC Day, so be sure to check the library opening hours for your campus library before you come to visit:

  Wednesday 25 April
Gold Coast  12 pm – 5 pm
Logan  12 pm – 5 pm
Mt Gravatt  12 pm – 5 pm
Nathan  12 pm – 5 pm
QCA  Closed
QCGU  1 pm – 5 pm

How to think critically

With the prevalence of ‘fake news‘ and the rise of ‘citizen journalism‘, the ability to think critically about the information you take in or believe has become incredibly important.

Critical thinking refers to thoughtfully reasoned consideration. E.g. ‘Do I believe this article from the Beetota Advocate to be true? Maybe it’s fake news?’

Besides applying it to everyday life (particularly when scrolling your social feeds), you will need to think critically when reading, note taking, doing assignments, preparing for exams, organising your time, and attending lectures and tutorials.

Critical thinking involves seven steps. Let’s say, for example, you had to make a decision about which university to attend. You would ultimately do the following:

1. Analyse and interpret the question
E.g. Ask: ‘Which university should I attend?’

2. Immerse yourself in the topic
E.g. Seek information about different universities.

3. Ask questions
E.g. Ask questions about University services, programs of study, and potential career paths.

4. Make links
E.g. Make a link between Griffith University and its impact on a future career in education.

5. Understand the different perspectives
E.g. Synthesise information from a range of sources, such as University open days; guidance counsellors; current students; and professionals in the field.

6. Understand the theoretical frameworks
E.g. Familiarise yourself with terminology and concepts relevant to universities, such as undergrad, postgrad, entry requirementsand pre-requisites.

7. Develop a position and arguments to support it
E.g. Make an informed decision about which university to attend. It was Griffith University, right?

– Extract from Study Smart –


You can borrow books from other uni libraries for free – Bonus!

Did you know you can borrow books from other university libraries for free? You don’t have to join their library, and you certainly don’t have to pay a membership fee.

How is this possible you ask? Well, Griffith University is part of the BONUS+ initiative, formed by multiple universities around Australia and New Zealand. Other participating university libraries include Victoria University, the University of Sydney, Australian National University and many more!

If the book you need is not held at any of our Griffith University Libraries or is out on loan, you can request it online from another BONUS+ library, and they’ll pick it off their shelves and mail it over to your selected Griffith library ready for you to collect!

So how do you request an item? It’s simple!

  • Search the library catalogue.
  • Click the Menu icon (it’s three horizontal lines at the top right).
  • Select Can’t find that book? BONUS+ (look for the little green button!).
  • Search for the book you want in the BONUS+ catalogue.
  • Select Request this item if the book is available at a BONUS+ library.
  • Select the campus you’d like to collect the book from under Pickup location.
  • Click Submit.

Keep your writing on track with a storyboard

Have you ever spent ages researching, only to run out of time or lose sight of the overall picture by the time you are ready to write your assignment?

Could it be that your literature review has taken too long to finalise or your research has moved away from the core of the assignment question?

If you are collaborating with other students, maybe your group members have unknowingly moved their focus. You realise the deadline is looming and you need to present your supervisor or lecturer with a coherent ‘story’.

This is where storyboarding can be of assistance when used from the beginning of your work.

Storyboarding basically comprises laying out the structure of your assignment, before starting to write it. Doing this helps you to capture, organise and compile your thoughts and research, as well as structure your work, right from the beginning.

There are a variety of tools you can use to storyboard your writing.

Scrivener has a free trial and can be purchased for a cheaper subscription if you are a student or academic with an institutional affiliation.

For people who like sticky notes/corkboards,  the free Index Cards tool is available on Windows. A similar app called Index Card 4 is downloadable for a small fee on your iPhone and iPad. If you use both Mac OS and iOS devices, Index Card 4 can also sync projects with the Scrivener app for Mac, making it easy to capture ideas on your iPhone/iPad while on the run and sync them with your Mac computer later.

There are many more apps available. Have a look at this recent  teachthought blog post for a list of 11 storyboarding apps for writers.