Get free tutoring and feedback on drafts with Smarthinking

Did you know that you can get free personalised tutoring and feedback on drafts, 24/7, with expert online tutors?

We know, sounds too good to be true, right? But it’s not! It’s Smarthinking.

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Griffith students seeking advice on improving their writing skills, with options to:

  • submit your writing for detailed review
  • request an appointment with a tutor, or
  • submit questions online.

A tutor will then respond within 24 hours. The tutors can review your assessment pieces, and provide you with comments and suggestions for your writing including:

  • paragraph, standard essay or long essay review
  • grammar and documentation review.

Remember, though, the tutors are there to help you improve your writing – they’re not going to edit, proofread and fix your work though. That’s up to you! And an essential uni skill.

Follow the instructions on the Smarthinking webpage to access the service.

In addition to the Smarthinking service, the library also has a range of online self-help resources available, such as:


Fastrack your research using our Library Guides

 

Imagine a place that had all your study guides ready to go; key information, databases, resources at your fingertips.

Well, lucky the trusty Griffith librarians are on it. Two words.

Library. Guides.

Our Library Guides compile all the databases and key information resources you’ll need for your subject area into one centralised area. Just go to the Borrowing and Resources library page and select your discipline under Library guides.

You can select a broad discipline, such as science and technology, or further narrow your selection to a specific subject, such as information technology.

This will help to ensure you’re not wasting time on research that isn’t the exact piece of information you need. Yep, we can hear you asking, ‘where has this been my whole life?!’

We have library guides for the below disciplines; click within the discipline for further subject-specific guides.


Are you assignment ready?

 

You ever finally build up the motivation to start the assignment that you’ve been putting off for what feels like 3 years? We know the ‘if it’s not the due date, it’s not the do date’ motto all too well. That feeling of last-minute panic, more stressful than the Bachelor finale; palms are sweaty, knees weak, arms are heavy. Well, adhering to that motto never ends well, does it? Not a good time, not a good feeling and definitely not a good result. So, we’re here to offer you 4 simple preparation tactics to help you tackle your assignments, and tackle them on time!

 

1. Get the bigger picture

It’s really important that you understand exactly how your assignment fits in with the course learning outcomes and aims.

Head to the course profile in myGriffith to find out what they are and how they relate to your assignment.

Understanding the overall connection will help you find the specific focus of the assignment.

 

2. Gather all the assignment information

The course profile in myGriffith should provide all necessary assignment details. Identify when the assignment is due, the percentage of your final grade it’s worth, the word limit and the correct format.

You will be asked to submit assignments in different formats; essay, literature reviews, reports or perhaps oral presentations. The Writing your Assignment module introduces you to the different formats and provides an outline of what they could include.

Be sure to check the marking criteria. It will tell you how many marks each section is worth and how your work will be assessed. If you understand the marking criteria, you can write an assignment that ticks all the boxes for your course.

 

3. Decipher the assignment task

You need to identify directive, topic and limiting words in the assignment question. These important words help you figure out how to research and write the assignment.

  • Directive words – The assignment task will contain directive words such as ‘examine’, ‘analyse’ or ‘compare’. Directive words tell you how to approach the assignment. Not sure what the directive word is asking you to do? Look it up in a dictionary or consult this handy Definition of Directive Words from California Polytechnic State University.
  • Topic words – Topic words identify the major concepts in your task. These will come in handy when you are looking for resources and help you stay focused on your topic.
  • Limiting words – Limiting words help narrow the scope of your assignment. They set boundaries for you and are often dates, locations or populations.

 

4. Ask a lot of questions

Now that you understand what you are being asked to do, it’s time to break down the task into mini questions.  Having a series of questions to answer will help you focus your research and writing. It also helps you develop a logical response to the topic.

The assignment task itself may contain mini questions. It may have a primary question and a number of secondary questions. The answer to the primary question is your overall argument.

The secondary questions could be descriptive or analytical. A descriptive question asks for background information or context to the primary question. Whereas, an analytical question prompts you to dig deeper into the assignment topic.

 

 

In addition to these steps, course reading lists, the library catalogue, Google Scholar and Library Guide’s Databases are handy platforms to check out once you’re ready to start researching.

 

So…let’s get started!


Need help with research and publishing?

Griffith University Library is here to help you fly into your research!

We’ve created a Research and Publishing webpage to assist you through this process. The Research and Publishing webpage covers everything from getting started on your research journey to getting published and attaining academic impact.

You’ll find links to:

  • Free workshops on topics like EndNote, developing your academic argument, editing your writing, managing your research data, publishing during your PhD and many more.
  • Postgraduate Research Information Skills Modules designed to guide you through every stage of your research journey.
  • Strategic publishing guidelines to assist you through publishing.
  • Academic impact resources.
  • Best practice data guidelines.
  • Plus much more.

Remember, Griffith Library is here to help you succeed in your research. Need more help? If you’re a Higher Degree Research candidate or academic you can book in for a free consultation with a specialist Discipline Librarian to assist you with your research specific information needs.


Get a head start on study by attending our Earlybird workshops

Quick quiz:

  • Are you starting uni this trimester?
  • Did you find last trimester’s study a challenge?
  • Do you want to further develop your learning skills?

If you answered yes to any of the above questions, our Earlybird workshops are perfect for you!

Prior to Trimester 3, 2018, we are offering the following Earlybird workshops free to Griffith students. Find out more at our Library Orientation webpage.

Writing university assignments (2hrs) 

Covers the basics of getting started, structuring and writing assignments.

Monday 22 October 2018
Wednesday 24 October 2018
Gold Coast
Nathan
9.30 am
9.30 am
Clinical Sciences 2 (G16_1.07)
Environment 2 (N13_0.05)

Getting started on an ePortfolio on PebblePad (45 mins)

Learn about Griffith’s personal learning environment – PebblePad.  Bring along a device and your login details.

Monday 22 October 2018
Wednesday 24 October 2018
Gold Coast
Nathan
11.45 am
11.45 am
Clinical Sciences 2 (G16_1.07)
Environment 2 (N13_0.05)

Researching and referencing for your assignment (2hrs)

Gain awareness of the wide range of information resources available at Griffith and learn to identify the principles of referencing and the process of applying them within academic work.

Monday 22 October 2018
Wednesday 24 October 2018
Gold Coast
Nathan
1.30 pm
1.30 pm
Clinical Sciences 2 (G16_1.07)
Environment 2 (N13_0.05)

Library orientation

The library is so much more than books on the shelves.

You can take a 15 minute tour of your library during orientation week. Getting to know your library will make studying at university so much easier.

Did you know you can book a group study room?

Need a study space to work on a group assignment or hold your study group? Our libraries have you covered!

We’ve got bookable group study spaces at every campus library – just waiting for you to book them!

To book one of our group study spaces, simply:

  • Go to the library’s Study page: https://www.griffith.edu.au/library/study
  • Scroll down to the red Bookable group study spaces slab
  • Click the Book your space link
  • Select the campus you want, click on the time desired, and follow the prompts to submit your booking.

You can book for up to two hours per day, and at any campus. Once you submit your booking, you’ll be sent a confirmation email. This email also includes a link to cancel your booking in case your plans change.

Now, all that’s left is for you to turn up and study – the easy part, right? 😉


Ace your referencing with our Referencing Tool

Even though referencing may seem a monumental task, it is important for many reasons. It shows what you have read, enables your reader to locate your referred sources, supports and strengthens your argument and

demonstrates academic integrity. It’s also an essential part of many assignments.

If thinking about referencing seems overwhelming, it’s OK. To make the task easier, Griffith University has developed a Referencing Tool.

And it’s as easy as 1, 2, 3 to use!

  1. 1. Select the reference style.
  2. 2. Select the media type.
  3. 3. Select the format.

Then BAM – the tool provides you an example. For both the in-text citation and the reference list entry.

This tool is also mobile device friendly for any ‘on the move’ referencing queries.

If you’re still feeling a bit perplexed, check out our Study Smart guide to referencing.

Happy referencing!