Need to study until the break of dawn? There’s a library for that

Need a quiet, safe and secure place to study until the wee hours? How about one with comfy couches, beanbags, excellent wifi and computer access? Do we have your attention now?

Look no further than your friendly neighbourhood library.

For the next three weeks, Nathan and Gold Coast libraries will open 7am Monday, and remain open 24 hours until midnight on Fridays with extended weekend hours to accommodate this.

  • Monday: 7am-12am (services open 8am – 7pm)
  • Tuesday – Friday: 24 hours (services open 8am – 7pm)
  • Saturday & Sunday: 9am – 10pm (services open 9am – 5pm)

Logan, Mt Gravatt and South Bank campuses are also open for extended hours.

You can find all the library opening hours here.

Use your time wisely and check out some of our self-help resources that can help you ace that assignment or exam. If you have a group assignment, book a study room.

Above all else, be kind to yourself and remember even Study Week ends eventually!


Lightning Talks is Real Speak

For those of you who weren’t among the sixty plus audience members at last week’s Lightning Talks in the Nathan Campus library – have no fear, we’ve got you covered!

So what are Lightning Talks?
Lightning Talks are similar to soapbox events or Speakers’ Corner in Hyde Park, London, where speakers give voice to a variety of topical issues and invite discussion on current affairs.

Our academics and professional experts are invited to talk for 10 minutes to talk about their work in relation to a theme, and then the audience is invited to ask questions.

Why do we hold these talks?

We are hoping to make research and ideas more accessible, removing the stigma of ‘ivory towers’, breaking down hierarchical divisions. Lightning Talks are an extension of Griffith University’s commitment to inclusivity, and bringing disciplines together.

Our speakers for #LightningTalks3 were:

Associate Professor Georgina Murray who kicked off the talks with her discussion centring on socio-political changes occurring in the world, and the effects of neoliberal political ideology, particularly around employment. She highlighted some shocking statistics about the casualisation of the Australian labour force with some of the societal ramifications being drug addiction, financial insecurity around obtaining home loans, and a lack of sick leave. So do companies like Uber break up monopolies of power or do they further contribute to marginalisation and disenfranchisement in our turbulent times?

Dr Duncan McDonnell discussed the rise of right-wing populism internationally and compared Australia’s One Nation with the more successful right-wing populists in Western Europe. He highlighted that right-wing populism is not historically new; we just rename it to go with the current time period. And whilst Donald Trump does not conform to the populist leader ideal; it must be acknowledged how his controversial nature got him elected once, and he can be again! Across the Atlantic, populist parties in Europe do well because unlike their mainstream counterparts, they focus on grassroots community engagement.

Dr Susanna Chamberlain started with asking the question, ‘What the heck is populism?’ and then led us on a journey that linked anthropology and history to binaries around populism. Populism, it appears, is about the leader’s’ ability to identify as the ‘common person’ aka ‘we are just like you’ ideal; however, that idea is often a misnomer as one might suspect with Donald Trump’s empire building — funded by a ‘small’ loan of a million dollars from his father– that hardly mirrors the average ‘common person’s’ start in life.

Mr John Tague, Griffith Review Managing Editor, brought his experience and knowledge as an international journalist to discuss changes in journalistic reporting and political writing. Griffith Review, a compilation of long form essays, engages its audience and reinvigorates the idea that not everything can – or should – be conveyed in 140 character Tweets. Brexit, Trump and right-wing European leaders regularly take to the mediasphere, often invoking moral panic by circulating narratives about alleged racial tensions, scientific knowledges, and rise of ‘fake news’ in the post- truth politics era.

For the full story, listen here.

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Protect your computer against viruses

As a uni student, your computer possibly contains 1353 words of your essay due next week (eeek!) and three gazillion gigabytes worth of photos from your entire life (well, this semester anyway).

With great love comes great responsibility. You need to take care of your computer so it doesn’t catch a virus.

According to PC Mag: ‘The effect of the virus may be a simple prank that pops up a message on screen out of the blue, or it may destroy programs and data right away or on a certain date. For example, the famous Michelangelo virus contaminated the machine on Michelangelo’s birthday’ (PC Mag Encyclopedia).

The sad face emoji isn’t sad enough to express how crummy it would be to lose all the data on your computer.

So, what can you do to protect against these viruses? Well, most importantly, ensure you have anti-virus software installed on your computer!

As a Griffith student, you can download Symantec Endpoint Protection through our Software Download Service for free. Yes, it’s free! So there’s no excuse not to do it.

Just follow our instructions to access the Software Download Service, select the Symantec Endpoint Protection folder and your operating system, and run the executable file.

If you want further protection, you could also download Norton 360 or Norton Internet Security. While these incur a fee, Griffith Students get 50% off, and we reckon that’s an alright saving! You can find out more about Norton Student Savings here.

Once you’ve gotten your anti-virus software sorted, there are a few more things to you can to do protect against computer viruses, so check out our post on how to secure your virtual world, and keep yourself protected online.


Using stats and need some last minute help… STAT?

Do you need to analyse stats in your classes this semester? SAGE can help get you over the line with that final assignment or upcoming exam.
With exams just around the corner, you may need all the help you can get (because of course you pre-planned your whole semester and don’t need any extra help… right?).

Even if you’re not currently studying stats, but statistical analysis really floats your boat (no judgement from us), this is a great tool to help you further develop your skills.

SAGE Research Methods Datasets is a collection of datasets to support independent learning of data analysis skills. They are particularly useful for practicing quantitative and qualitative analytical methods used in the social sciences.

The datasets are obtained from real research projects, but edited and cleaned for teaching purposes and usability.

Each dataset is accompanied by a short and clear description of the data, and easy to follow instructions on how to apply the research method.

SAGE also has a range of accompanying tools to support the use of these datasets. Some particularly helpful tools are:

  • Methods Map: you can explore the research methods terrain, read definitions of key terminology, and discover content relevant to your research methods journey.
  • Project Planner: this tool helps you plan out and progress through the stages of your research project. When you click on the link to the stage you are at it will give you a breakdown of the components of the stage, with links to further readings.
  • Which Stats Test: this tool helps you to narrow down the range of options for statistical testing though answering a series of questions, and help you decide on the most pertinent test for to use for your project.

Take a look at the SAGE Research Methods website for further tools and information


Do you love Instagram? Follow @griffithlibrary!

Are you all loving Instagram right now? We certainly are!

There was our #libraryshelfie comp in July where you, our talented students, posted amazing pics on Insta for a chance to win $300.

We’ve featured a selection of the #libraryshelfie entries on our Instagram. You should totally head over to @griffithlibrary to check it out. And while you are there, take a moment to enjoy our other Instagram posts. There’s heaps of Insta-goodness to soak in!

There are our regular quotes, of course. We find quotes that amuse us and share them on Instagram with you. We’d call them our regular ‘funny quotes’, but we don’t like to toot our own horn. But feel free to have a chuckle or belly laugh when you read them.

Our Instagram is also a way for us to indulge in our love of books.  We are a library after all, and we have a not-so-secret book obsession.

From books that make up a rainbow to books you read in a hammock, we celebrate all books on our Instagram feed. And if the #bookstagram post is as pretty as a picture, well, that’s just a bonus.

We’re always on the lookout for fresh Instagram content from our students. So if you snap a pic that you think we’d like, be sure to tag us (we are @griffithlibrary). You never know, we may just repost it!


How to stay safe online

Having different passwords for different sites is one way to keep your personal and financial information safe online.

But there are so many sites that require you to login with a password. How do you keep track of all them? Well, one easy way to remember all your passwords is to create a master password.

The master password should be a combination of letters and numbers e.g. mpie2r (my password is easy to remember).

You then modify the master password for each site. So, your password for Pinterest might be mpie2rpin while your password for Tumblr might be mpie2rtum.

Having a strong password is another way to keep your information secure. You may choose an obvious password like ‘password’ or ‘123456’ because it’s easier to remember and you don’t think you’ll be hacked.

But it could happen. Spend a few extra minutes creating a secure password that will deter hackers. The safety of your personal and financial information is well worth the effort.

Another way to maintain your security online is to avoid opening spam and clicking on random links. Some spam is incredibly well disguised but chances are:

  • You haven’t won $1000000 in a lottery fund
  • That Nigerian prince who wants your bank details is not a prince
  • Your bank won’t request your password or account details online

–Extract from Study Smart —


Protect your digital life

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When you lend your mobile device, did you know you’re also sharing your internet account, email and Facebook?

And do really want to give your study buddy access to your Facebook account? They’ll just post cringe-worthy selfies from your camera roll or startling revelations about your embarrassing celebrity crush (which is obvs completely false).

Or even worse. They could use up all your internet data to watch cats being funny on YouTube. Which is fine, but only if you got to see the furry feline shenanigans as well.

How does this happen? Well, you’re connected to the Griffith Wi-Fi on your mobile device, right? You’ll notice that once you’ve signed in, you are never asked to sign in again.  You will be logged in and out of Internet access automatically as part of the Griffith Single Sign-on feature.

This means that when you share your mobile phone, tablet or laptop with your classmate, all their internet use will be billed and logged against you!

And don’t forget, you’re probably logged into all your social media and email accounts as well.

Which means they can not only post to your Facebook (as you), but also to Snapchat, Instagram and Twitter. And just for kicks, they could swipe right for all of Tinder.

Now, your friends and classmates are probably too responsible to be irresponsible with your digital life. They would never prank post on your social media, use all your internet data, or mess with your email.

But if they do. Just remember, we told you so.