Need a laptop? We’ve got you covered!

Have you been up all night watching Netflix – uh I mean studying – and forgot to charge your laptop before bed. Gotten settled into your favourite study spot only to realise you also left your charger at home? Or maybe #studentlife means you can’t afford a laptop. No need to worry, though, as the Library has you covered with a free laptop-loan service.

If you are a Griffith University student, simply mosey on over to the Library Desk and request a laptop. You’ll need to show your student card of course, but that’s about it.

And then you can have the laptop for three whole hours. You can use the laptop anywhere on campus; whether you want to head outside, go to class, or bunker down in the library, it’s up to you.

All laptops have the basic student software installed and are connected to the University’s wireless network.

Now, be aware we don’t have an endless supply of laptops. Get in early during the busy periods to avoid disappointment. It’s first come, first served!

Laptops are available for loan during library services opening hours (not to be confused with library building opening hours).


Story time gets spoooooky!

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There’s more to Mount Gravatt Campus than meets the eye – in fact, it even houses a historic primary school, Yarranlea Primary School.

There’s also more to our library staff than meets the eye. In addition to providing our patrons with great client support, our Library Campus Services Team Member Jana Rudledge is also a qualified Children’s Librarian.

Once a month she puts these skills to good use, inviting the children from Yarranlea Primary School to the Mount Gravatt Library for Storytime.

As the excited children shuffled into the thoughtfully set up and decorated reading area, we could tell this event is clearly a highlight of their week.

This month’s Storytime theme was Halloween. Jana read Miss Nelson is Missing to the captivated students, a book which was one of her own favourites as a child. It tells the story of a teacher with an unruly class, who disappears and is replaced by a ghastly substitute teacher. Who would have thought, when Miss Nelson returns her students are much more appreciative!

Storytime is always followed by a fun related activity – this time, some spooky Halloween magic.

Children were given a balloon and small ghost cut out of tracing paper. By rubbing the balloon on your hair, you create static energy. If you then hold the balloon above the ghost, it will raise off the table and into the air – magic (almost)!

Whether the children were more engrossed in the magic, or simply playing with the balloons, we can not ascertain! Though the students left Storytime with huge smiles on their faces and some slightly dishevelled hair.


Get ahead with Earlybird workshops

New to study? We’ve got just the thing for you – some Earlybird workshops on PebblePad, writing university assignments, research and referencing as well as Library orientation tours.

On 26 October 2017, you have a chance to join the workshops on Nathan and Gold Coast campuses. Starting at 8:45am, the three workshops are spread over the day and you can arrange for a Library tour at the front desk of any Library.  In fact, anytime during orientation week, you can ask at your Library’s front desk of a tour!  No need to book the workshops or the tour.

Getting started on an ePortfolio on PebblePad (1hr)

Learn about Griffith’s personal learning environment – PebblePad.  Bring along a device and your login details.

Thursday 26 October 2017
Thursday 26 October 2017
Gold Coast
Nathan
8:45am
8:45am
Lecture Theatre 3 (G17_LT3)
Macrossan (N16_0.06)

Writing university assignments (2hrs)

Covers the basics of getting started on structuring and writing assignments.

Thursday 26 October 2017
Thursday 26 October 2017
Gold Coast
Nathan
1:00pm
10:00am
Lecture Theatre 3 (G17_LT3)
Macrossan (N16_0.06)

Researching and referencing for your assignment (2hrs)

Gain awareness of the wide range of information resources available at Griffith and learn to identify the principles of referencing and the process of applying them within academic work.

Thursday 26 October 2017
Thursday 26 October 2017
Gold Coast
Nathan
10:00am
1:00pm
Lecture Theatre 3 (G17_LT3)
Macrossan (N16_0.06)

Library orientation

The library is so much more than books on the shelves.

You can take a 15 minute tour of your library during orientation week.  Getting to know your library will make studying at university so much easier.

Happy birthday Queen Elizabeth II, happy birthday to you!

Photo of Queen Elizabeth

Monday 2 October is a public holiday to mark the birthday of this steadfast royal.  This day has been celebrated since 1788 and provides you with a well-deserved break from lectures and tutorials.

The Library will definitely be open but our hours have been altered slightly.   Make sure you check the library opening and closing hours before you decide to pay us a visit.

Monday 2 October 2017
Gold Coast 10am – 5pm
Logan 12pm – 5pm
Mt Gravatt 12pm – 5pm
Nathan 10am – 5pm
Queensland College of Art 9pm – 1pm
QCGU 1pm – 5pm

Need to study until the break of dawn? There’s a library for that

Need a quiet, safe and secure place to study until the wee hours? How about one with comfy couches, beanbags, excellent wifi and computer access? Do we have your attention now?

Look no further than your friendly neighbourhood library.

For the next three weeks, Nathan and Gold Coast libraries will open 7am Monday, and remain open 24 hours until midnight on Fridays with extended weekend hours to accommodate this.

  • Monday: 7am-12am (services open 8am – 7pm)
  • Tuesday – Friday: 24 hours (services open 8am – 7pm)
  • Saturday & Sunday: 9am – 10pm (services open 9am – 5pm)

Logan, Mt Gravatt and South Bank campuses are also open for extended hours.

You can find all the library opening hours here.

Use your time wisely and check out some of our self-help resources that can help you ace that assignment or exam. If you have a group assignment, book a study room.

Above all else, be kind to yourself and remember even Study Week ends eventually!


Lightning Talks is Real Speak

For those of you who weren’t among the sixty plus audience members at last week’s Lightning Talks in the Nathan Campus library – have no fear, we’ve got you covered!

So what are Lightning Talks?
Lightning Talks are similar to soapbox events or Speakers’ Corner in Hyde Park, London, where speakers give voice to a variety of topical issues and invite discussion on current affairs.

Our academics and professional experts are invited to talk for 10 minutes to talk about their work in relation to a theme, and then the audience is invited to ask questions.

Why do we hold these talks?

We are hoping to make research and ideas more accessible, removing the stigma of ‘ivory towers’, breaking down hierarchical divisions. Lightning Talks are an extension of Griffith University’s commitment to inclusivity, and bringing disciplines together.

Our speakers for #LightningTalks3 were:

Associate Professor Georgina Murray who kicked off the talks with her discussion centring on socio-political changes occurring in the world, and the effects of neoliberal political ideology, particularly around employment. She highlighted some shocking statistics about the casualisation of the Australian labour force with some of the societal ramifications being drug addiction, financial insecurity around obtaining home loans, and a lack of sick leave. So do companies like Uber break up monopolies of power or do they further contribute to marginalisation and disenfranchisement in our turbulent times?

Dr Duncan McDonnell discussed the rise of right-wing populism internationally and compared Australia’s One Nation with the more successful right-wing populists in Western Europe. He highlighted that right-wing populism is not historically new; we just rename it to go with the current time period. And whilst Donald Trump does not conform to the populist leader ideal; it must be acknowledged how his controversial nature got him elected once, and he can be again! Across the Atlantic, populist parties in Europe do well because unlike their mainstream counterparts, they focus on grassroots community engagement.

Dr Susanna Chamberlain started with asking the question, ‘What the heck is populism?’ and then led us on a journey that linked anthropology and history to binaries around populism. Populism, it appears, is about the leader’s’ ability to identify as the ‘common person’ aka ‘we are just like you’ ideal; however, that idea is often a misnomer as one might suspect with Donald Trump’s empire building — funded by a ‘small’ loan of a million dollars from his father– that hardly mirrors the average ‘common person’s’ start in life.

Mr John Tague, Griffith Review Managing Editor, brought his experience and knowledge as an international journalist to discuss changes in journalistic reporting and political writing. Griffith Review, a compilation of long form essays, engages its audience and reinvigorates the idea that not everything can – or should – be conveyed in 140 character Tweets. Brexit, Trump and right-wing European leaders regularly take to the mediasphere, often invoking moral panic by circulating narratives about alleged racial tensions, scientific knowledges, and rise of ‘fake news’ in the post- truth politics era.

For the full story, listen here.

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Protect your computer against viruses

As a uni student, your computer possibly contains 1353 words of your essay due next week (eeek!) and three gazillion gigabytes worth of photos from your entire life (well, this semester anyway).

With great love comes great responsibility. You need to take care of your computer so it doesn’t catch a virus.

According to PC Mag: ‘The effect of the virus may be a simple prank that pops up a message on screen out of the blue, or it may destroy programs and data right away or on a certain date. For example, the famous Michelangelo virus contaminated the machine on Michelangelo’s birthday’ (PC Mag Encyclopedia).

The sad face emoji isn’t sad enough to express how crummy it would be to lose all the data on your computer.

So, what can you do to protect against these viruses? Well, most importantly, ensure you have anti-virus software installed on your computer!

As a Griffith student, you can download Symantec Endpoint Protection through our Software Download Service for free. Yes, it’s free! So there’s no excuse not to do it.

Just follow our instructions to access the Software Download Service, select the Symantec Endpoint Protection folder and your operating system, and run the executable file.

If you want further protection, you could also download Norton 360 or Norton Internet Security. While these incur a fee, Griffith Students get 50% off, and we reckon that’s an alright saving! You can find out more about Norton Student Savings here.

Once you’ve gotten your anti-virus software sorted, there are a few more things to you can to do protect against computer viruses, so check out our post on how to secure your virtual world, and keep yourself protected online.