It’s Library Week!

Library week banner

Do you know what this week is? Well, besides being the last week of classes for this trimester (which we’re sure you’re also awfully excited about), it’s Library and Information Week!

Library and Information Week is all about raising the profile of libraries and information service professionals in Australia, and showcasing the resources, facilities, events, and services we have to offer.

While we know our students appreciate our libraries (last year we even got given a cake – thank you Layla!), we thought we’d take this opportunity to remind you just how wonderful we are.

Events

We’re often hosting fun events, like Music in the Library, Star Weaving, or even a weekend-long hack-a-thon. In fact, our Human Library event is on this week, where you can take a person out on loan for a conversation on the topic/issue that they represent.

Resources

We have books, a lot of books. And computers so you can check your MyGriffith, access online databases, use software, and – let’s be honest – probably check your social media. You can even borrow a laptop.

But that’s just the physical. Our library website is full of helpful resources such as the library catalogue (a must) and study tips.

Facilities

We’ve got a myriad of facilities including quiet and social study zones, computer labs, toilets (yeah, they’re kind of a necessity), bookable group study rooms and videoconferencing rooms, and even an Xbox at Gold Coast library.

Did you know we even got Google to come and film our libraries? You can actually take a virtual tour of our libraries. If you haven’t checked it out, you should (it’s pretty cool).

And good news for you, our libraries will soon be open extended hours for study and exam weeks! Check out our opening hours here.

Services

You’ll find friendly staff behind all our library desks. They are there to help you with any library questions you may have. 

Not in the library? No worries. You can also call (07 3735 5555 for Brisbane or 07 5552 5555 for Gold Coast), email, chat us, or ask a question online.


Are you following us on Instagram?

Griffith Library Instagram feed

We’ve seen some of you over on the @griffithlibrary Instagram, and we appreciate all your likes and comments. Fist bump to all our regulars!

But for those of you who aren’t familiar with our feed, maybe now’s the time to take a peek. You can see pics from our fabulous library events, like the recent weekend Hack-a-thon at the Gold Coast.

And it’s not just photos – we’ve dabbled with mini video content such as Boomerang and Instagram Stories. Check out the Boomerang of our massive Hack-a-thon cheque. Cool, right?

While we aim to keep you up-to-date with all the latest library resources and services, we also like to have a little fun on Insta. Okay, so maybe a lot of fun.

We keep you entertained with humorous, motivational or inspirational quotes, like the one we posted recently by Timothy Healy.

There’s also our semi-regular #bookfacefriday posts. Because who doesn’t enjoy seeing how creative some folk can be with their face, a book cover, and a mobile phone? Here’s one we posted a few days ago.

And as much as you’ll flip over the #bookfacefriday posts, you’ll love our behind-the-scenes snaps of our beloved library staff and lovely library spaces even more. Don’t you just dig this shot of one of our more colourful staff members?

Head over to Insta and scroll through the @griffithlibrary feed. If you like what you see, be sure to give us a Follow.


How to keep on top of your referencing

Person writing list

Referencing is a big part of uni. It’s how you clearly and consistently acknowledge all the information sources you have used in your work.

Being such an essential skill, we recommend you become proficient at it.

As an undergraduate student where you’re generally writing shorter assignments (I know, 2000 words isn’t that short – but hey, it’s shorter than a dissertation!) we suggest you use our referencing tool to guide you with your referencing. The referencing tool is designed to provide you with examples of direct quotations, paraphrasing and full references for a range of resources you may have used when researching a topic. Over time you’ll build up your skills in this area, and know what a reference should look like.

As you move towards more lengthy assignments, research papers, and so forth, you may be struggling to stay on top of the massive array of resources you’ve used.

Enter: EndNote.

EndNote is Griffith’s recommended bibliographic management software, and enables you to easily:

  • Collect references
  • Organise references and documents in a searchable library
  • Create instant reference lists and/or bibliographies

It’s super handy if you have a large amount of research you need to organise. You are able to store all the citations in one place, and easily insert them straight into Word. And, as soon as you insert an in-text reference into word, the full reference will be added to the document’s Reference List section.

Best part – it updates. If you decide to remove a section of text, which may have had an in text reference used nowhere else, this reference will automatically be removed from your Reference List too #timesaver.

Ok, another best part. It’s free!

To get EndNote, follow the instructions on the EndNote page to download it.

For more information on referencing, check out our referencing study smart page.

 


Effective oral presentations: plan, prep and practice

Photo of hand holding a microphone

Ten percent of the population are genuinely terrified of speaking to a group, according to Forbes.

But a slightly more surprising statistic is that ten percent of the population love public speaking. Who wouldn’t want to be one of those people?

That leaves most of us in the middle of the spectrum. We aren’t terrified as such, but suffice to say public speaking gives us butterflies, sweaty palms and maybe even a sleepless night before the big presentation.

There are many strategies you can employ to help ease your nerves. But nothing beats planning, preparation and practice – lots and lots of practice.

Planning

The first thing you’ll need to need to do is analyse the assignment question. Like any assignment task, it’s important that you understand what you are being asked to do by gathering all the relevant details, deciphering the task and breaking it down into mini questions that you can answer.

Make sure you understand what you need to include in your presentation. For example, do you need to demonstrate proficiency in Microsoft PowerPoint? What are the key features of the program that you need to demonstrate proficiency in?

And what about audience participation? Are you required to develop an interactive activity for your audience? All of this should be detailed in the course profile and/or marking criteria. If in doubt, ask your lecturer!

Preparation

Presentations follow a similar structure to written assignments. So just like an essay, a case study or a literature review, you will need to prepare an introduction, body and conclusion. Head to the Study Smart module on Writing your assignment to find out what each of these entail.

And remember, it’s important to reference any information you use at university. So be sure to include a reference list in a PowerPoint slide or print handout so your audience can source the information for themselves (and your lecturer can see that you did your research!). Head to the Study Smart Referencing module to find out the essentials of referencing.

Practice

Practicing your presentation is extremely important. Try practicing in front of friends, other students, your dog or cat – or even the mirror! This will help you to remember the content and structure of your presentation, and to prepare for audience participation and activities.

Palm cards with a list your key points (not your entire speech), can also aid your memory.


Fighting malaria

Mosquitos are not just annoying, they are also dangerous and can bring all sorts of devastating diseases as well. One of those is malaria, a disease that kills many people around the world.

25 April is World Malaria Day and Griffith researchers are working on the case to defeat it.

Want to know what Griffith researchers have done so far?

Our key researchers in the field include Professor Michael Good, Professor Vicky Avery, Dr Leonardo Lucantoni, Professor Sally-Ann Poulsen and Professor Katherine Andrews.

You can view journal articles the researchers have published on the Griffith Experts site. This can be a great way for you to find journal articles written by your lecturers and maybe improve your marks.

Type “Michael Good” in the search box, and you can see the Professor’s publications to see what work he has done so far.

Here are a few activities promoting World Malaria Day:

Malaria Day Luncheon Event

  1. 26 April
  2. N75
  3. Proceeds donated to Rotary Against Malaria for the purchase of bed-nets.  Everyone donating/purchasing lunch will receive a ‘peg’ mosquito to pin on a the symbolic bed-net!
  4. RSVP: Leo, l.lucantoni@griffith.edu.au

Outreach Packs

  1. Packs contain educational material/activities designed to educate and engage children (8-12 years) with activities that include find-a-word, cross-words, a maze and colouring in pages.

Online Quiz

  1. “How much do you know about malaria?” is a 25 question online quiz designed to educate as well as capture information about current knowledge on malaria and malaria prevention.

Build a mosquito competition

  1. Fancy your craft skills can build a mosquito?  Give it a go and share on social media to raise awareness of malaria and its prevention.

Use your skills to win part of $3500!

 

Are you a totally tech savvy student? Maybe you’re involved in IT, marketing, app development, or project management? Or maybe you just want to learn how to create an app (hey, that’ll look sweet on your #resume #workskills).

We’re building a few apps and we want to get our super talented students involved in designing the app – from the ground up!

To get involved, you can register as an individual or as a team. Ultimately, you’ll be working in groups of three to four people to develop a web/mobile application based on the top 5 app ideas from our app idea competition, and showcase it to the judges. Oh, and you can also win a lot of money:

  • $2000 for the winning team of the Hack-a-thon
  • $1000 for the runner-up team of the Hack-a-thon
  • $500 for best UI design

So, how’s this all going to work? We throw open the doors to the Gold Coast Library at 9am Saturday 29 April and you have 30 hours to work on the app and enjoy life! And, we are totally feeding you as well so register now and just tell everyone you were there to build an app.

  1. When: 9am 29 April to 4pm 30 April 2017
  2. Where: Gold Coast Campus Library (The Cow Patch)

Best books: Librarians’ pick

The Little Prince

Our librarians have a wealth of knowledge. They use that knowledge to provide support to students and staff for research, referencing, academic writing, strategies for getting published, and much more…

But beyond that, there’s another thing which they know well. Books. So we asked them a simple question: what book would they recommend you read?

Here’s what they had to say:

The Little Prince – Antoine de Saint-Exupery
Recommended by Cherie Basile, Arts, Education & Law Librarian
I found it so beautiful when I was first reading it that I did not want to ever finish it. I can remember rationing myself to only one chapter per night as I got closer to the end. It only has 91 pages and the chapters are only a few pages each long, so that was a hard thing to do, but I just wanted it to last forever. I would wish a book like that for everyone.

The Tomorrow series – John Marsden
Recommended by Rhiannon Reid, Library Services Team Member
One of the best book series I have ever read, I re-read repeatedly as a student. The Tomorrow series taught me about courage, friendship…and camping. But mostly the first two things. For students who are moving towards independence and self-sufficiency, I cannot recommend these books more highly.

The Hobbit – J.R.R. Tolkien
Recommended by Anie Woskanian, Library Services Team Member
This is one of my favourite books. I think every student needs to escape reality now and then. This book offers just that!

The Talisman – Stephen King and Peter Straub & The Harry Potter Series – J.K. Rowling
Recommended by Stephanie Ferguson, Library Services Team Member
It’s a toss up between these two. I think Harry Potter as a whole series was amazing and my husband and I read it to our children as they were growing up….until they could read it for themselves. The Talisman has so many layers and interesting characters it was hard to put down.

The Design of Everyday Things – Donald Norman
Recommended by Suzanne Bailey, Resource Discovery Specialist
Have you ever stood in front of a microwave, pausing to think, because you were not sure how to open it. After reading this book you will never look at any object (or interface) the same. Norman points out the obvious – things I took for granted and made me think about everything in a new light. The next time you fumble with a door, a tap or your mobile device, you will think back to the lessons of the book and question everything.

Elvis Presley: Unseen Archives – Marie Clayton
Recommended by Rhonda Nothling, Library Services Team Member
This is one of the best Elvis books out there, and Elvis is the King so everyone must read this book!

The First 90 Days : Critical Success Strategies for New Leaders at All Levels – Michael Watkins
Recommended by Maureen Sullivan, Director of Library and Learning Services
The book is particularly relevant as the University focuses on employability and soft skills necessary to be successful in the workplace. It’s a great, short, easy to digest primer on negotiating and surviving those early weeks in any new position but especially one with supervision or management responsibilities.