Where to start your research

While Wikipedia is great for giving you a quick understanding of a topic, we don’t recommend you ever use it in an assignment. Effective researching is a critical uni skill. But where should you start? 

Course readings

Course readings are great place to start when doing research for assignments.

Find your course Reading List in Learning@Griffith. It can be found in your course profile, in the Readings section of your course site, or by searching for your course here.

Reading Lists provide you with links to online resources (eBooks, journal articles, web pages), or to the Library catalogue so you can find print resources.

Library catalogue

The Library catalogue is a great place to search for resources.

From books, journal articles and videos to conference proceedings, newspaper articles and online documents, the Library catalogue has it all, and more!

It lets you search for a huge number of resources in one place – the search box on the library home page.

Databases

To find specialised information, you will need to use online search tools, like the Library databases.

You can search databases to find specialised resources, such as:

The library also has databases for different disciplines. So if you require information on a business, law, education, health, science or social science topic, there is a database for you.

Not sure which database to search for your discipline? Check out our handy library guides.

Google Scholar

Now, you’ve probably used Google to search for information before. Whether it was for academic, work or recreational purposes, we all know how helpful the search engine can be.

But did you know Google has an academic search engine? Google Scholar is a search engine which searches a wide variety of sources including academic online journals, conference papers, dissertations, technical reports and books.

You can even use Google Scholar to find academic resources at Griffith University. It’s as simple as changing a setting. Head to the About Google Scholar webpage to find out how.

– Extract from Study Smart –


Where should you store your files?

You’ve worked hard on your study notes and assignments, so you want to make sure you are saving those files in a secure space. Which, by the way, is not to the desktop of our computers.

So, where should you store these files? Let us tell you!

When you’re using the common-use computers on campus, you’ve got two main options: H Drive, and Google Drive.

H Drive

H Drive is available from common use computers via My Computer on the desktop.  If you save your files here, you will be able to access them from any common use computer at any campus.

Though if you’re using one of our library laptops, you’ll need to use FileWay to access H Drive.

If you want to access files saved to H Drive off campus it does get a tad tricky. You’ll need to login to Griffith’s VPN first. You get a quota of 50MB storage space for H Drive.

Google Drive

Google Drive is connected to your student email account. It’s accessible from any computer browser and most mobile devices. All you need is a connection to the internet and you’re sweet to access it anywhere.

You also get unlimited storage space on your Google Drive – that’s right, unlimited. Take a squiz at our post on using Google Drive for further info.

It’s also important to remember:

  • Saving your work to any other location on common use computers (e.g. the desktop or My Documents) will result in deletion when you log out or turn off the computer.
  • Backup, backup, backup your files! Along with Google Drive and H Drive, you could save to a USB or email the file to yourself.

Google Apps are the appsolute best

Google is basically Dumbledore. Like Dumbledore reigned Hogwarts (before he got thrown off a building, anyway), Google reigns the realm of internet-related services and products.

Not only does Google provide a search engine any millennial couldn’t live without (how would we win arguments without it?), did you know they have a whole suite of online apps?

As a Griffith student, you are automatically given a Google Apps account, which gives you access to:

  • Gmail: Kinda a necessity. Your Gmail also has unlimited storage, too.
  • Google Calendar: You can schedule meetings, get reminders and notifications, share calendars, create tasks lists, and basically manage your entire life (well, almost).
  • Google Docs, Sheets, and Slides: Create, share and collaborate on documents real time from desktops. Super handy for group assignments, or when you need someone to proofread your work. Plus, they’re all compatible with MS Word, Excel, and PowerPoint.
  • Google Drive: Never fret about a lost USB again. Store files in the cloud so they can be accessed from anywhere.
  • Google Hangouts: Chat to your friends via voice, video or instant messaging.

To get to Google Apps, from your student email simply click on the Google Apps button (the 9 cubes at the top right of the screen).

We suggest you take a look and utilise these wonderful apps – you don’t want to be left behind like Ask Jeeves or Crabbe and Goyle (yeah, you might have to Google those).

Find more information on Google Apps here.


Storing your files, made easy

Photo of folders

Did you know that your student email is Gmail based?

And with that comes a whole suite of associated apps, you’ve just gotta click the Google Apps icon at the top right to get to them (hint, it looks like nine small cubes). To get to Google Drive, you just click on the Google Drive option!

So, what is Google Drive? It’s basically a free online file storage system.

Google Drive allows you to easily store your photos, documents, slides, drawings, sheets, videos – anything. Your files in Drive can be reached from any mobile device or computer. So wherever you go, your files go. You can quickly invite others to view, download and collaborate.

Benefits include:

  • Unlimited free storage – no more running out of space.
  • Access everywhere – you can access your files anywhere either via the web or offline by installing Google Drive onto your computer, smartphone or tablet.  
  • Automatic syncing – if you change a file on the web, on your computer or on your mobile device it will automatically update on every device you have installed Google Drive.
  • Secure backup –with Google Drive you will always have your files safely stored in the cloud should anything happen to your computing device. #lifesaver
  • Easy and secure collaboration – you can share files with colleagues and edit them together on any device. So super handy for group assignments! You can also manage exactly who you share your files with and what level of access they will have (view only, or edit).

How convenient, right? I bet you’re kicking yourself as to why you haven’t been using Google Drive already!

No more tears over lost USBs full of all your important assessment! Though, do remember to backup your work and not store it all in the one location.


How to keep on top of your referencing

Person writing list

Referencing is a big part of uni. It’s how you clearly and consistently acknowledge all the information sources you have used in your work.

Being such an essential skill, we recommend you become proficient at it.

As an undergraduate student where you’re generally writing shorter assignments (I know, 2000 words isn’t that short – but hey, it’s shorter than a dissertation!) we suggest you use our referencing tool to guide you with your referencing. The referencing tool is designed to provide you with examples of direct quotations, paraphrasing and full references for a range of resources you may have used when researching a topic. Over time you’ll build up your skills in this area, and know what a reference should look like.

As you move towards more lengthy assignments, research papers, and so forth, you may be struggling to stay on top of the massive array of resources you’ve used.

Enter: EndNote.

EndNote is Griffith’s recommended bibliographic management software, and enables you to easily:

  • Collect references
  • Organise references and documents in a searchable library
  • Create instant reference lists and/or bibliographies

It’s super handy if you have a large amount of research you need to organise. You are able to store all the citations in one place, and easily insert them straight into Word. And, as soon as you insert an in-text reference into word, the full reference will be added to the document’s Reference List section.

Best part – it updates. If you decide to remove a section of text, which may have had an in text reference used nowhere else, this reference will automatically be removed from your Reference List too #timesaver.

Ok, another best part. It’s free!

To get EndNote, follow the instructions on the EndNote page to download it.

For more information on referencing, check out our referencing study smart page.

 


Celebrate Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) fields

Today (March 8) is International Women’s Day, a day to celebrate the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women and to advocate for international gender equality. It is also a great chance to celebrate the achievements of women in the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) fields – an area where women are often underrepresented, but still achieving great things.  Many of our STEM field researchers at Griffith are women and the work they are doing is both innovative and inspirational.

Here are just a couple of the women doing great things in STEM fields at Griffith:

Want to find more women who are involved in STEM research at Griffith? Griffith Experts is the best place to search for all of our academic staff, find their research publications and projects and more. How about discovering historical women in STEM? Oxford University Press has created an interactive timeline celebrating women in STEM that can get you started.


You’ve got a pending Friend Request

O-Week is all about making new friends that will last a uni-lifetime.

Friends who will be with you in the Library at 11pm the night before your dreaded stats exam; friends who will generously share their lecture notes when you’re sick the Tuesday after June long weekend; or friends who will buy you the double choc muffin you’re drooling over because they know your food (noodle) budget doesn’t include the $3.95 treat.

Just like these friends, Griffith Library will be there for you through your Uni journey. Whether you’re navigating your timetable, learning the referencing ropes or delving into the world of data research we’re here to help.

We promise we’ll be your best buddy offering news, resources, discounts, event info, competitions and training on our awesome Facebook, Twitter and Instagram pages. And if that isn’t enough for you, then subscribe to this Library blog for regular tips, tricks, study help, IT deals, competitions and more! 

All you need to do is Like and Follow Griffith Library and we’ll be BFFs in no time! #Justdoit.

To find friends that aren’t just online, check out Griffith Mates.