Eva Hesping for World Malaria Day

Eva Hesping, PhD candidate at Griffith Institute for Drug Discovery (GRIDD), Compounds Australia.

25 April is World Malaria Day. The World Health Organization reports 219 million new cases of malaria as recently as 2017. You can find papers on malaria research being conducted by Griffith Institute for Drug Discovery (GRIDD) on Griffith Research Online and get to know our Griffith researchers. Today we are featuring Eva Hesping, a PhD candidate, at GRIDD.

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How to stay on top of your course readings

We’re coming up to week 9 already, and if you already don’t know about course readings, here is your chance to learn all you need to know!

It’s crucial to stay on top of your readings when they’re assigned, and we are here to help make sure they’re all in one easily accessible location. It’s super easy, so no excuses!

Just head over to Learning@Griffith and click on your desired course; you will find a Readings link on the left-hand menu. From here you’ll go to the readings you’ve been assigned and the links which will take you directly to them.

If your assigned reading is an online resource, you will see the View Online button. All you need to do is click on the button and it’ll take you directly to the resource you need. eBook, website, video – you’ll be ready to read or watch.

If it’s not an online resource, don’t stress, you should be able to find it in our library! Just click on the resource title to expand and see the availability and location of the book in our libraries.

You can even personalise your Reading Lists by assigning a read status to resources such as will read, reading now, have read, and won’t read (although we know you won’t be using that one!). You can also add handy little study notes.

If you want to know more, check out our FAQs for Reading Lists.


The winner of our Griffith Then & Now competition is…

@md_mahdi11 – east car park after a bushfire decades ago & now #griffiththenandnow

This year we held our first ever ‘Griffith: Then & Now’ competition. We did our best at creating Then & Now photos, then we asked you guys to come up with your own.

And we have to say, we loved seeing your take on a ‘Then & Now’ photo – you guys sure are a talented bunch.

We’ve had some amazing entries, and, after a week of voting, we have a winner!

Congratulations @md_mahdi11, you’ve scored yourself a $100 visa card!

Thanks to everyone who entered, voted or simply watched from afar.

We’d like to give a special mention to @trentellis11 – check out his image (below) of when he was a student at QCA’s sculpture studio in 1990, back when QCA was located at Morningside – compared to the derelict old Morningside site in 2015.

@trentellis11 – QCA Morningside Sculpture Studio 1990-2015. #griffiththenandnow

Loved seeing Griffith’s history come to life? Follow @GriffithArchive on social media, or hop on over to the Archive website.

 


Vote for your favourite Griffith Then & Now image!

Our students, staff and alumni have been busy snapping away their ‘Griffith: Then & Now’ images – now it’s time to select the winner of our $100 prize.

This is an Instagram competition, so voting is Instagram based – and it’s as simple as 1, 2!

We’ll collate all likes, and the post with the most likes as of next Friday (29 March) wins.

Alright – time to get voting! 😉


4 reasons why you should love group assignments

*Gasp* yes – group assignments can actually be good for you.

Even though sometimes they can seem like a major pain, group assignments expose you to some transferrable real-world skills that your future employer will jump at.

Yes, I can see you rolling your eyes, but hear me out. Maybe it’ll help you see the light at the end of the tunnel when you’re hating on your next group assignment.

So, why are they good?

1. They teach you how to communicate

There are many different communication styles and personality types, and this will influence the group dynamics (want to procrastinate? Why not take a DISC personality test and learn a bit about your style?). Group assignments give you exposure to working with different types of people. People may be dominant, or like to be led, or full of intelligent ideas but too introverted to speak up.

2. You’ll become a pro at conflict resolution

Unless you’re living in some fantastical dream land (can I come visit?), you’re probably not going to get along with everyone in your group. You know what though? That’s OK. The important thing is how you approach conflicts. Remember to always stay level headed, try and see your other members’ points of view, there may be things of a personal nature going on that you are unaware of. It is important to always communicate with respect, every person deserves that. One strategy is to talk and listen, decide what the real issue is, identify what actions or non-actions are contributing to it, then develop options based on what is best for the group.

3. Hands-on experience managing project schedules

Who’s gonna do what, when? Maybe you simply started a Facebook chat and assigned a few tasks. Guess what? That’s delegation. If you’re super organised, maybe you’ve even created a timeline with due dates for drafts and final edits for different sections of your assignment. Make sure you take notes of your meetings, so you know who attended, what was discussed, who agreed and disagreed and what actions people agreed to do. Finish your assignment to schedule, and you won’t be stressed, pulling an all-nighter the day before your assignment’s due. Nope; you’ll be hitting the town having a grand old time (why are so many assignments due on a Friday night?!) – cheers to that submitted assignment!

4. Employers will love it

Chances are, you’re at uni with the aim of scoring your dream job? (or you’re a career student who just. loves. learning). If it’s the former, well then, heed this advice to love group work! Because you can add all the aforementioned skills to your resume. You could even highlight how these skills are transferrable to the job you’re applying for in your cover letter, during your interview or *fingers crossed* when you start (and ace!) your new job.

Want to learn how to ace group assignments? Head on over to our Study Smart webpage and check out our Group Assignments section—chock full of helpful tips.

 


Learn all about Ireland this St Patty’s Day

Sunday 17 March is Saint Patrick’s Day.

The day celebrates the traditional death date of Saint Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland.

However, over time, the day has evolved into a greater celebration of all things Ireland.

Celebrations usually include public parades, festivals, shamrocks, wearing green and the consumption of alcohol (this was encouraged from, historically, the Lent restrictions on drinking alcohol and eating being removed for the day).

Want to learn more about Ireland, Irish history and Irish culture? Check out our research on Griffith Research Online.

Some interesting titles include:


Borrow a human book

 

What happens when you get a group of people together in one room sharing their life stories, confronting social stigma and challenging prejudice? Magic!

Immerse yourself in a bestseller of a different kind at our Human Library.

On Wednesday 20 March 2019, we are flipping the Nathan campus library on its head and offering you the chance to borrow a person, instead of a book!

We’ve gathered together a group of storytellers keen to share their experience with social stigma, prejudice and discrimination in the hope to break down barriers, challenge beliefs and create a more tolerant society.

In our Human Library, you can borrow a human book on a certain topic and sit down with them for an honest and open 20 minute chat about their life experiences and the issues they have faced.

What kind of books can you borrow at our Human Library?

Want to borrow a human book? Want to be involved in this unforgettable experience? Register as a reader in our Human Library. There are limited sessions available in this two-hour event, so get in quick!

Book: Julie and Tara

Title: Cancer Vol 1&2

Story: We don’t refer to ourselves as “survivors”, as for us, the train we hopped on had to make it to the station where we could both hope off to a “new normal”. We both live with the guilt of seeing friends hop on the train, but the journey ended so differently. Our stories are similar in so many ways, but our journeys to our new normal were dramatically different. We are two friends, both diagnosed with breast cancer at the same age. Both adopted, so we had no idea if breast cancer was in our families. What we do know is cancer can also bring positive outcomes and the bond we now have is one of them.

Register for this book

Book: Uncle Bob

Title: Hidden Generation

Story: I was born to an Aboriginal father and a non-Aboriginal mother who separated when I was about three. It was the time of the stolen generation, when indigenous children were being taken from their families by government agencies. To avoid being identified as an Aboriginal, I was raised with my mother and white brothers along with grandparents, uncles, aunties and cousins.
I was never allowed contact with my Aboriginal relatives for fear I would be taken away. I was denied any access to my culture or my father’s family. I left home around sixteen to make my own way as a young man, which is what all of my instincts told me to do. It was much to the disapproval of my family and I have had no understanding from them or close ties with them ever since.
It wasn’t until most of my mother’s family had passed away that my aunty confirmed that my father was an Aboriginal. She could not remember where his family came from so to trace them has been a nightmare. The search for more information and understanding of my culture is ongoing. I put a lot of time into community work, but I still struggle to understand why I have the feelings I do and why am I who I am, and I am still coming to grips with my spiritual self. This is a legacy of being one of the hidden generation, at least the stolen generation know who they are and where they are from, they haven’t lived in this cultural void I call no mans land.

Register for this book

Book: Gemma

Title: Obesity

Story: I struggled with my weight since the age of 22. At a hight of 5’6 and weighing over 142kg I had tried everything to lose weight. I was so obese that I needed a walking stick to get around. When my doctor told me I would be dead in 10 years, I made a decision that would change my life. Aged 34 (at the time) and a mother of 2 children, I was not ready to die so young. My doctor suggested Gastric Sleeve Surgery, where 80% of the stomach is removed to reduce portion of food intake. I agreed on the spot, and started shopping around for a good surgeon. Less than 6 months later, I was on the operating table. That was in October 2017, and I have lost over 50kg and only have 20kg left to reach my goal. Most of my weight fell off me within the first 9 months after surgery, and I said good bye to my walking stick only 2 months after. It was the best decision of my life. I love my sleeve!

Register for this book

Book: Donald

Title: Sexually Abused Child

Story: On a warm November afternoon in 1988, I was sitting next to my mother on a chartered bus from the Gold Coast to Brisbane. We were on a trip to see Whitney Houston in concert. I was sipping on my second glass of champagne, my second, ever. We were happily chatting, yet during the course of this conversation I blithely told Mum that I had been repeatedly sexually abused by John- when we lived in Mildred Street. I was 15 when I told Mum. I had lived with that secret for more than half my life. I saw my mother’s face crumple. It was heartbreaking. Despite all that I knew, this was the worst moment of my life… until then. That’s what abuse does. I may have learnt at an early age about depravity- but with that an ever-present sense of fortitude and compassion. And that’s what forgiveness does.

Register for this book

Book: Aunty Heather

Title: Female Elder

Story: I am a proud Kamilaroi-Kooma (Aboriginal) woman. I believe in bridging the gap and understanding with Reconciliation in my heart and growing as equals together as one. I believe that we need to develop an understanding of all cultures that make up the island we call our country of Australia, that we love and want to share with the world. As a younger person, I worked for 27 years in the outback on cattle and sheep stations, shearing sheds and earth moving camps. Today, I am Acting Aboriginal Co-Chair of Reconciliation Queensland Inc. and sit on the Board of Murrigunyah (Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islanders Corporation for Women). I am Director of DV Connect (Domestic Violence service QLD) and work as an Aboriginal Elder running Cultural Workshops. For the past 14 years, I have worked as an Indigenous Cultural Consultant for Queensland Health in Child & Youth Mental Health Service.

Register for this book

Book: Susan

Title: First in Family

Story: I’m a country girl from remote NSW, turned international lawyer on the world’s stage. I was the first in my family to attend University and started my law degree with no contacts, no clue whatsoever about what a University degree entailed, but with high hopes about what my future could hold. Now I’m a proud International Lawyer and advocate for human, womens and refugee rights. Trying to move mountains and create good.

Register for this book

Book: Ari

Title: Jewish

Story: I am an Australian Jew who works as a Jewish Community Worker. I am passionate about Interfaith and demonstrating how my religion with ancient roots has a modern role in society. I am a survivor of childhood sexual abuse and have been through the path of self destructive behaviors and now facilitate at a men’s group MARS (Men Affected by Rape and Sexual Abuse) to help other men through the healing recovery process. I believe communication is the key to bringing down barriers.

Register for this book

Book: Chrissie

Title: Girl in a van

Story: I packed up my cosy apartment life, sold all my belongings and moved into a van, all the while staying in my home city and continuing my full-time job. It’s been two years now, and I’ve moved on to a roomier box truck, which I’m slowly converting into a functional tiny home whilst living inside. It’s still raw and has only a few amenities, but I’ve added some girly touches and it feels like home. I sleep in a different location most nights and spend the weekends road-tripping or staying at beaches and forests. I realise I can’t do this forever in the one town, so I’m saving and building and one day I’ll be able to quit the job and travel the country.

Register for this book

Book: Uncle John

Title: Aboriginal

Story: I am a Senior Learning Assistance Officer in the GUMURRII unit on Griffith’s Nathan Campus. I am a traditional custodian of the Gold Coast region, a Kombumerri man, a saltwater man of the Gold Coast part of the wider Yugumbeh Language Group. The Yugumbeh lands are located between the Logan River in the north and the Tweed River in the south. They are bordered by the mountains to the west and the ocean to the east. I am also a Griffith Business School graduate, Alumni and long-term employee (18 years) of Griffith University. I am a member of the Griffith Council of Elders and have the privilege of being acknowledged as an Elder on the Yugumbeh Elders Group.

Register for this book

Book: Jazmina

Title: Ex-muslim

Story: I’ve been on both sides – from Hijab-wearing devout Muslim to an unveiled ex-Muslim atheist. I left Islam after feeling a disconnection between my world views and the Islamic teachings, especially on matters regarding gender roles, the LGBTQI community and capital punishment. It’s a scary position to be in because some Muslims believe that apostates should be killed. Often, Muslims who wish to leave the religion never manage to do so out of fear of receiving death threats and being excommunicated from their communities. It is for the same reasons that I have not told my family and I continue to lead a double life when they visit me. If I have the chance to speak to people, I would share my story of me exercising my human right to non-religious freedom, and I would make a clear distinction between disagreeing with Islam and Islamophobia.  

Register for this book

Book: Narelle

Title: Lesbian Catholic Priest

Story: I was ordained in 2010 as the first female Catholic Priest in Australia. I am a lesbian, foster mother, activist and passionate permaculturist and committed to providing a safe, welcoming and accepting church community for people to find comfort, inclusion and reflection. After suffering a major stroke in 2003 I dramatically changed my career paths. From the Chief Executive Officer of the statewide non-government organisation to a disability pension, I refocused my life direction, moving from a career in social work to theology. I learnt the value of good friends, fell in love and opened my heart and garden to build community. I could not be happier with my life. I love sharing my story of recovery, gardening and finding the spiritually of life on the way.

Register for this book

Book: Reena

Title: Multicultural Advocate

Story: I grew up in a small city in India and came to Australia as a student. My dream has always been to unite people from all walks of life, to remove racial barriers and replace them with a sense of belonging. I made my dream come true by organising multicultural fashion shows that challenge the stereotypes of beauty and fashion through celebrating all men and women, no matter what cultural background, shape or size. I believe beauty is in the spirit which shines through in your eyes, in your laughter and through your happiness. Diversity and acceptance is the culture we should follow and I am proud to be a platform that says no to pre-existing stereotypes of the fashion industry as we lead the way to a more inclusive future all the while promoting multiculturalism.

Register for this book

Book: Yaseen

Title: Muslim Male, Prisoner of War and Sufferer of PTSD

Story: As a 22-year-old international student, I didn’t know what September 11 really meant for Muslims until I was taken away from my hostel and locked behind bars. Nine months in a window-less cell, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, the worst was yet to come. I was treated as a soldier of the unknown enemy, who had the capability to strike but didn’t have the motive (yet). But like every story, there was a happy ending.

Register for this book

Book: Dean

Title: Urban Farmer

Story: I deeply believe that becoming more sustainable is simple, easy and achievable for everyone. We need to seriously start being more green in our homes and communities now, because everything we do has an effect on the Earth. I am an urban farmer, permaculturist and gut health guru. Originally from a rural farming background, I now strongly focus on urban farming – bringing food growing back into the towns and cities, where it has traditionally always been in sustainable cultures. I run several related local, national and international groups and projects to support homes and communities in sustainable living. Join the green revolution!

Register for this book

Book: Richo and Maggie

Title: Veteran and Assistance Dog

Story: A former Army Apprentice and member of the Royal Australian Engineers, I returned to university in my late 40s after a serious spinal cord injury. The study challenges ahead became overwhelming, until I was introduced to the Australian Student Veterans Association (ASVA). Today with the support of Maggie (Chief Happiness Officer / assistance dog), I am achieving great results in both undergraduate and postgraduate studies.

Register for this book

Book: Anne

Title: Alcoholic

Story: I lost two children, and then I lost myself. It was a long journey through pain and shame to discover who I really was. I have discovered that escaping our feelings only brings more problems, sometimes facing the pain and feeling it, can lead to enlightenment. With the help of the AA program I gained an honest understanding of what it is to be a human being, accepting our imperfections and embracing joy and suffering as the whole of life’s experience.

Register for this book