Lightning Talks on Sustainability Week

 

 

GOAL BUSTERS! – Transforming our world is the new Griffith Library Lightning Talks celebrating the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

Griffith University is celebrating Sustainability Week (2 to 6 September) and Griffith Library will host Lightning Talks GOAL BUSTERS! – Transforming our world on Thursday 5 September, drawing on the UN Sustainable Development Goals. The goals are drawn around global challenges brought on by our increasingly disparate, resource demanding and automated civilisation. Each have the aim to be achieved by 2030 to create a liveable future for our communities and our planet.

Facilitator: Assoc. Prof.  Jim Smart from the Australian Rivers Institute.

Prof. Rebecca Ford

Rebecca develops novel tools for selective breeding to improve the sustainability and security of “plant-derived” food production systems. This is achieved through the mitigation of biotic and abiotic factors that impact yield and quality and the optimisation of resource inputs used for their management. In particular, Rebecca is researching the application of next generation sequencing and transcriptomics to understand salinity and drought tolerance mechanisms, fungal pathogen population dynamics and the genetic pathways enabling fungal pathogen resistances in temperate legume and broad acre crops.

Prof. David Peetz

David is professor of employment relations at the Centre for Work, Organisation and Wellbeing here at Griffith University. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia as well as the author of Unions in a Contrary World (1998) and Brave New Workplace (2006) and co-author of Women of the Coal Rushes (2010), in addition to numerous other academic articles, papers and reports.

Assoc. Prof. Susan Harris Rimmer

Susan is an Australian Research Council Future Fellow in the Griffith Law School. She is an Adjunct Reader at the Asia-Pacific College of Diplomacy at the Australian National University and a Research Associate at the Development Policy Centre in the Crawford School. She is a non-resident Research Associate at Chatham House in the UK. Susan’s Future Fellow project is called ‘Trading’ Women’s Rights in Transitions: Designing Diplomatic Interventions in Afghanistan and Myanmar.

Riley Theidecke

Riley was part of the 2019 Top 6 qualifying team in the Hult Prize with their development of the modular farming project “FarmCube”. The annual Hult prize competition is in partnership with the Hult International Business School, the Clinton Foundation and the United Nations Foundation. Riley and the team’s challenge was to solve a social problem related to the sustainability goals outlined by the UN. “FarmCube” was shortlisted for Build the foundations of a venture that will provide meaningful work for 10,000 youth within the next decade.

FarmCube:

FarmCube integrates current vertical hydroponic technology within a closed loop, insulated and climate controlled refurbished 40-foot shipping container. The design and technology allow for innovation and the establishment of micro infrastructure (SDG 9) in geographically challenged areas. Through the power of modular farming FarmCube hopes to reduce poverty (SDG 1) and hunger (SDG 2) within these areas. Furthermore, FarmCube provides access to decent work and economic growth (SDG 8). FarmCube aims to achieve all this whilst leverage a learning base business model that provides quality transferable education (SDG 4) at every step of the supply chain.

Event details:

📅 Thursday 5 September 2019
⏰ Noon – 1 pm
🏠The Willett Centre (N53) Nathan Library (Level 2).


2019 #LibraryShelfie Winner

It’s official iahyhan is the winner our 2019 #LibraryShelfie competition!

With their take on Nathan Library with View from above! Congratulations, iasyhan you’ve won $300!

We would like to thank everyone who entered!


Lightning Talks: Crimes and Punishments

Exploring the darker side of human nature

Since the appropriation and settlement of Australia’s mainland to the present time, much has changed in our approach and attitudes to crimes and punishments. Most notably, it has been a shift from large-scale convict transportation, with its comprehensive system of colonial justice and punishment, to ideas of justice and retribution that include restorative justice, justice reinvestment and social-benefit bonds. Through a number of stories, retribution, reform and rehabilitation are themes explored in Griffith Review 65: Crimes and Punishments.

Also, these themes are often reflected in research – the impact of crime on family and community and, of the changing attitudes to criminology on reform and rehabilitation. The following snapshot of open access research, held in Griffith Research Online, forms part of the research narrative around the interconnection between crime and punishment and societal impact and attitudes:

Read more Griffith University research on crime and punishment.

Please join us at the Griffith Review and Griffith Library presentation of Lightning talks: Crimes and Punishments.

Featuring experts:

Prof Susan Dennison

Professor Susan Dennison is a professor and deputy head of school (Research) in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University as well as deputy director of the Griffith Criminology Institute.

Prof Ross Homel

Professor Ross Homel is Foundation Professor of the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University. His research is focused on preventing crime, violence and injuries, and promoting the positive development of children and young people living in crime disadvantaged communities.

Dr Sarah Woodland

Dr Sarah Woodland is a practitioner, researcher and educator in applied theatre, specialising in participatory arts and prison theatre. Currently she is a Research Fellow at Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre.

Dr Lacey Schaefer

Dr Lacey Schaefer is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University and a Research Fellow with the Griffith Criminology Institute. A 2017 study undertaken by Dr Schaefer in environmental corrections saw a 28% reduction in reoffending.

Date

  1. Wednesday 21 August 2019
    Noon – 1 pm

Location

  1. Mt Gravatt Library (M13) Level 2

Library Shelfie winner is up to you!

It’s time to vote for your favourite LibraryShelfie!

Massive shoutout to all those who entered! We will be announcing the winner tomorrow!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


Crimes and Punishments


📅Date: Wed, 21/08/19

⏰Time: Noon-1pm

🏠Place: M13 Mt. Gravatt Library (Level 2)

Griffith Review and Griffith Library bring you the Lightning Talks your true-crime loving heart has been waiting for.

Griffith Library has been bringing you Lighting Talks for over two years now. Never been to one and not sure what to expect? No worries! Lightning Talks are similar to Ted Talks, with our speakers giving their expert opinion on a topical subject in a short amount of time.

Lightning Talks: Crimes and Punishments takes the Griffith Review Edition 65 topics further to explore the complex nature of crime and justice.

Featuring an expert panel, we will also have time for questions, so come along and enjoy!

Featuring:

Professor Susan Dennison is Professor and Deputy Head of School (Research) in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University as well as Deputy Director of the Griffith Criminology Institute.

Professor Ross Homel is Foundation Professor of the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University. His research is focused on preventing crime, violence and injuries, and promoting the positive development of children and young people living in crime disadvantaged communities.

Dr Sarah Woodland is a practitioner, researcher and educator in applied theatre, specializing in participatory arts and prison theatre. Currently she is a Research Fellow at Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre.

Dr Lacey Schaefer is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University and a Research Fellow with the Griffith Criminology Institute. A 2017 study undertaken by Dr. Lacey Schaefer in environmental corrections saw a 28% reduction in reoffending.

Stay tuned on Facebook as we bring you more information on these incredible speakers.

#GriffithReview #GriffithLibrary #LightningTalks


Crimes and Punishments: Lightning Talk

What is it about crime stories that has us so compelled? From true crime podcasts to Netflix bingeing on tales of the allegedly wrongfully convicted, we get hooked.

Behind every true crime narrative are real people; the victims, witnesses, the advocates, the practitioners. Every crime is a story and just conclusions are often elusive.

Griffith Review and Griffith Library are teaming up to present Lightning Talks: Crimes and Punishments to support the publication of Griffith Review 65 – Crimes and Punishments. This Lightning talks events will explore the complex and fascinating question of why justice can wear so many guises and how crimes and punishments affect the every day.

Prof Susan Dennison

Professor Susan Dennison is a professor and deputy head of school (Research) in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University as well as deputy director of the Griffith Criminology Institute.

Prof Ross Homel

Professor Ross Homel is Foundation Professor of the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University. His research is focused on preventing crime, violence and injuries, and promoting the positive development of children and young people living in crime disadvantaged communities.

Dr Sarah Woodland

Dr Sarah Woodland is a practitioner, researcher and educator in applied theatre, specialising in participatory arts and prison theatre. Currently she is a Research Fellow at Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre.

Dr Lacey Schaefer

Dr Lacey Schaefer is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University and a Research Fellow with the Griffith Criminology Institute. A 2017 study undertaken by Dr. Lacey Schaefer in environmental corrections saw a 28% reduction in reoffending.

Date:

Wednesday 21 August 2019
Noon – 1 pm

Where:

Mt Gravatt Library (M13) Level 2


How to become a referencing pro

 

Referencing. You know, the part of the assignment you always put off, stress about, absolutely dread! Well, what if we let you in on our little secret to help make referencing a breeze?

If you are an undergraduate student, we suggest you use our referencing tool to guide you with your referencing.1`

The referencing tool is designed to provide you with examples of direct quotations, paraphrasing and full references for a range of resources you may have used when researching a topic. Over time, you will build up your skills in this area and know what an appropriate reference should look like.

As you move towards more lengthy assignments, you may be struggling to stay on top of the massive array of resources you’ve used. This is where EndNote comes in handy.

EndNote is Griffith’s recommended FREE bibliographic management software which enables you to easily:

  • Collect references
  • Organise references and documents in a searchable library
  • Create instant reference lists and/or bibliographies.

This is perfect if you have a large amount of research that you need to organise. You are able to store all citations in one place and insert them straight into your document. And, as soon as you insert an in-text reference into your word doc, the full reference will be added to the document’s Reference List section.

Best part? It updates! If you decide to remove a section of text which may have had an in-text reference used nowhere else, this reference will automatically be removed from your Reference List too – what a #timesaver.

To get EndNote, follow the EndNote instructions at the bottom of the referencing page to download it.

For more information on referencing, be sure to check out our referencing study smart page.