Need to study until the break of dawn? There’s a library for that

Need a quiet, safe and secure place to study until the wee hours? How about one with comfy couches, beanbags, excellent wifi and computer access? Do we have your attention now?

Look no further than your friendly neighbourhood library.

For the next three weeks, Nathan and Gold Coast libraries will open 7am Monday, and remain open 24 hours until midnight on Fridays with extended weekend hours to accommodate this.

  • Monday: 7am-12am (services open 8am – 7pm)
  • Tuesday – Friday: 24 hours (services open 8am – 7pm)
  • Saturday & Sunday: 9am – 10pm (services open 9am – 5pm)

Logan, Mt Gravatt and South Bank campuses are also open for extended hours.

You can find all the library opening hours here.

Use your time wisely and check out some of our self-help resources that can help you ace that assignment or exam. If you have a group assignment, book a study room.

Above all else, be kind to yourself and remember even Study Week ends eventually!


Lightning Talks is Real Speak

For those of you who weren’t among the sixty plus audience members at last week’s Lightning Talks in the Nathan Campus library – have no fear, we’ve got you covered!

So what are Lightning Talks?
Lightning Talks are similar to soapbox events or Speakers’ Corner in Hyde Park, London, where speakers give voice to a variety of topical issues and invite discussion on current affairs.

Our academics and professional experts are invited to talk for 10 minutes to talk about their work in relation to a theme, and then the audience is invited to ask questions.

Why do we hold these talks?

We are hoping to make research and ideas more accessible, removing the stigma of ‘ivory towers’, breaking down hierarchical divisions. Lightning Talks are an extension of Griffith University’s commitment to inclusivity, and bringing disciplines together.

Our speakers for #LightningTalks3 were:

Associate Professor Georgina Murray who kicked off the talks with her discussion centring on socio-political changes occurring in the world, and the effects of neoliberal political ideology, particularly around employment. She highlighted some shocking statistics about the casualisation of the Australian labour force with some of the societal ramifications being drug addiction, financial insecurity around obtaining home loans, and a lack of sick leave. So do companies like Uber break up monopolies of power or do they further contribute to marginalisation and disenfranchisement in our turbulent times?

Dr Duncan McDonnell discussed the rise of right-wing populism internationally and compared Australia’s One Nation with the more successful right-wing populists in Western Europe. He highlighted that right-wing populism is not historically new; we just rename it to go with the current time period. And whilst Donald Trump does not conform to the populist leader ideal; it must be acknowledged how his controversial nature got him elected once, and he can be again! Across the Atlantic, populist parties in Europe do well because unlike their mainstream counterparts, they focus on grassroots community engagement.

Dr Susanna Chamberlain started with asking the question, ‘What the heck is populism?’ and then led us on a journey that linked anthropology and history to binaries around populism. Populism, it appears, is about the leader’s’ ability to identify as the ‘common person’ aka ‘we are just like you’ ideal; however, that idea is often a misnomer as one might suspect with Donald Trump’s empire building — funded by a ‘small’ loan of a million dollars from his father– that hardly mirrors the average ‘common person’s’ start in life.

Mr John Tague, Griffith Review Managing Editor, brought his experience and knowledge as an international journalist to discuss changes in journalistic reporting and political writing. Griffith Review, a compilation of long form essays, engages its audience and reinvigorates the idea that not everything can – or should – be conveyed in 140 character Tweets. Brexit, Trump and right-wing European leaders regularly take to the mediasphere, often invoking moral panic by circulating narratives about alleged racial tensions, scientific knowledges, and rise of ‘fake news’ in the post- truth politics era.

For the full story, listen here.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


Get student discounts on IT equipment and software

Technology.

We can’t live without it, can we? Well, not unless you’re super committed to a Live Free or Die lifestyle. But we certainly couldn’t survive uni without it, that’s for sure.

We’ve told you about the importance of anti-virus, but before that, you need a computer and software too. Luckily, there are student discounts available to help you with this.

If you’re after a new computer or IT equipment, Apple, Dell and HP all provide student discounts. You can find these at the HP Griffith store, Dell student deals and the Apple education store (you’ll need your Griffith logon to access the Apple store).

Once you’ve got your workstation, don’t forget the importance of protection! You can get 50% off selected Norton anti-virus products including Norton 360, Norton Internet Security, and Norton Internet Security for Mac. Just register your student email address and follow the prompts here.

You can also download a range of software from our Software Download Service, including EndNote, SAS, SPSS (annual subscription fee applies), Symantec Endpoint Protection and more. And don’t forget you can get Microsoft Office 365 for free!

Find more information at our IT Discounts webpage.


Research online with eBooks

It’s that time of trimester. We’re sure you’re all buckling down, and working hard on all your upcoming assignments (not procrastinating and watching Netflix, right?).

You’re probably doing quite a bit of research, and while our libraries are wonderful places, we get that sometimes you’d rather be at home.

This is where our eResources come in handy! We have an array of journal articles and eBooks that you can access from home to help you with your research.

You can search for journal articles, databases, eBooks, and more by clicking inside the library catalogue and filtering the search parameters.

While we have eResources for all disciplines, we have recently enabled access to over 8 900 new titles published from 2015 to 2017 in the following Springer Collections:

  • Biomedical and Life Sciences
  • Engineering
  • Computer Science
  • Medicine

To access these specific eBooks, simply:

  • Jump onto the library website
  • Click inside the library catalogue, to filter the search to books on the left hand side, and then electronic only from the drop down menu
  • Type in your search terms in the main text field. Use the keywords “springer”, and one of the collection names names listed above, for example “engineering” and start browsing.

Happy researching!


Protect your computer against viruses

As a uni student, your computer possibly contains 1353 words of your essay due next week (eeek!) and three gazillion gigabytes worth of photos from your entire life (well, this semester anyway).

With great love comes great responsibility. You need to take care of your computer so it doesn’t catch a virus.

According to PC Mag: ‘The effect of the virus may be a simple prank that pops up a message on screen out of the blue, or it may destroy programs and data right away or on a certain date. For example, the famous Michelangelo virus contaminated the machine on Michelangelo’s birthday’ (PC Mag Encyclopedia).

The sad face emoji isn’t sad enough to express how crummy it would be to lose all the data on your computer.

So, what can you do to protect against these viruses? Well, most importantly, ensure you have anti-virus software installed on your computer!

As a Griffith student, you can download Symantec Endpoint Protection through our Software Download Service for free. Yes, it’s free! So there’s no excuse not to do it.

Just follow our instructions to access the Software Download Service, select the Symantec Endpoint Protection folder and your operating system, and run the executable file.

If you want further protection, you could also download Norton 360 or Norton Internet Security. While these incur a fee, Griffith Students get 50% off, and we reckon that’s an alright saving! You can find out more about Norton Student Savings here.

Once you’ve gotten your anti-virus software sorted, there are a few more things to you can to do protect against computer viruses, so check out our post on how to secure your virtual world, and keep yourself protected online.


Give yourself a well-earned break. It’s Recharge Week!

Has Trimester 2 left you with the strangest urge to take naps absolutely anywhere every chance you get?

If the amount of ‘study time’ spent on the library bean bags is anything to go by, it’s fair to say a recharge is desperately needed. Lucky for you, it’s Recharge Week (see what we did there?).

Recharge Week is Griffith’s gift to your internal battery. Take the time to give yourself a breather between now and Exam Weeks (sorry to bring that up).

We all know how important it is to do your best at uni, but taking the best care of yourself is essential. And, bonus! Studies have proven that taking time out can actually increase your productivity and success…as long as you come back once you’re recharged!

Recharge Week Events will be held at every campus, providing some fun and unusual ways to recharge. You might even learn your future marks from a clairvoyant reading! Or just get warned that ‘you’re about to take a journey…’ or should be on the lookout for a ‘tall handsome stranger’.

Come along to a Griffith Recharge Week event, or if none of these are your thing, arrange your own Recharge activities, like binge-watching Game of Thrones. That’s bound to be relaxing, right?!


Use WhatsApp? You better read this

Where would we be without modern technology?

Probably getting lost a lot more frequently (no Google Maps to save us), not nearly as connected socially, likely going outside more often, and we’d have a lower chance of developing arthritis in our hands from excessive texting.

Modern technology helps us stay connected and on top of things. But just as fast as technology is evolving, hackers and cyber security threats are evolving too.

Now, we don’t suggest you put on a tin-foil hat and revert to using an old Nokia block phone. But you do need to be mindful of information security threats.

WhatsApp is a useful app; it allows us to easily stay in contact with friends around the globe. You know what’s not so great though? When things go wrong and a phising scam steals your bank details and personal information.

A new scam sent by an unofficial ‘The WhatsApp Team’ claiming ‘your subscription will be ending soon’ is currently in circulation.

The fake message warns that in order to continue to use the service, you need to update your payment information. The email includes a link for victims to sign in to a customer portal and update their details.

Warning: it’s a trap! If you follow this link, your personal and financial details can be exploited by cyber criminals.

So, if you receive this message – ignore and delete!

And stay safe: online, in bed, on the roads, in general.

Find more information at the Stay Smart Online page.