How safe is your digital life?

Digital life banner

Computer security is in your hands – part two

Don’t be the catch of the day

Beware of Phishing emails pretend to be a legitimate email from a business or organisation, and attempt to fool the recipients into revealing sensitive personal information, usually in the form of credit card numbers or important passwords.

A common one pretends to be from a bank and states your account will be closed if you don’t login immediately. The email looks legitimate and even has a handy link to the login page. However, this is bogus and instead you are giving the phishers your bank login details when you try to access the site. Some versions of this email will even log you into the real site so you don’t realise anything is amiss.

Protect your digital life on your mobile device

When you lend your mobile device, did you realise you are also sharing your internet account, email and Facebook? Make sure to sign out of all your accounts and wireless before you do so.

Always use protection!

  • Always use anti-virus software.
  • New viruses come out every day – keep your software up to date!
  • Scan your computer regularly. If it runs at an inconvenient time, reschedule them to run later.
  • All devices can get viruses, even your phone!

“Nobody would want my account anyway – there’s nothing worth stealing.”

You are often the target, not the University. With your account they can access all the information the University knows about you through the Griffith Portal. They can use this to steal your identity. If you have access to other people’s details, financial records, student records or HRM records, they can use this to help steal those identities too.

They could access your email and collect details on your work colleagues, look at meetings you attend or invites to social work events. They can stalk your personal life and that of anyone you communicate with. They can apply for credit cards in your name, siphon money from bank accounts and ruin you.

 

 


This Week in the Library – Semester 2, Week 10

this-week-in-the-library

The semester is almost over – make the most of our free workshops before they finish for the year.

To view the entire workshop timetable, visit the Workshops and Training webpage on the library website.  Please note that some workshops require bookings – check on the website for more information.

Don’t forget about our consultation services – they can help with your Academic, Computing and Library Research Skills.

Workshop Date Start Time Campus Room
Exam strategies Tuesday, 7 October 11:00 AM Nathan N53_1.51
Connecting with Google Tuesday, 7 October 01:00 PM Gold Coast G10_2.04
Word: theses and other long documents Wednesday, 8 October 01:00 PM Gold Coast G10_2.04
Word: formatting for consistency Wednesday, 8 October 09:30 AM Nathan N53_1.50
EndNote Thursday, 9 October 01:00 PM Gold Coast G10_2.04
EndNote Thursday, 9 October 09:30 AM Nathan N53_1.50

 


Photography fan? You’ll love this free event

Join QCA lecturer Dr Charles Page as he shares highlights from his beautiful photographic essay Memories in Place: The Centenary of WW1. 

Renowned Brisbane documentary photographer Dr Page specialises in social documentary photography. He has recently released his moving book Memories in Place: The Centenary of WW1, and will be sharing highlights from it at a free event at the South Bank campus this month.

What: Memories in Place: The Centenary of WW1 presented by Dr Charles Page

When: Thursday 23 October, 5.30pm for a 6.00pm start.

Where: Level 7 Webb Centre, Queensland College of Art, South Bank campus

RSVP: This event is free, but registration is essential. Staff, students and members of the public are all welcome.

For more information or to register for the event, visit the event website.

 

Memories in Place

Jardin du Luxembourg, Paris, France 2010. From Memories in Place, by Charles Page.

 


Mt Gravatt library closures

The Mt Gravatt Library will be closed the weekend 4–5 October due to work on the Library building

  • students and staff can still visit the Nathan campus for face-to-face library and IT assistance over the weekend
  • students and staff can still contact the Library staff via phone, email, chat
  • the computer lab in M24 3.32 will be open 24 hours
  • the Mt Gravatt library will reopen 6 October (12-5pm)

How safe is your digital life?

Digital life banner

Computer security is in your hands

  • Log out correctly, including before you turn off your computer
  • Don’t share your passwords
  • Report security issues here

Why should I log out?

If you don’t log out properly you risk:

  • have your internet quota stolen,
  • get viruses,
  • have your email hacked into.

How safe is your password?

“My bank doesn’t make me change my password”

You are responsible for any activity which takes place from your account. If you have any suspicion that your account is being used by somebody other than you, immediately change your password.

Some simple rules for keeping your account safe.

  • Do not write your password down, you don’t write down your credit card pin.
  • One of the most common things people do when creating a stronger password is to use a word or name followed by two digits (usually 69, a birth year, age or the current year), followed by an exclamation mark. It’s best to avoid this format.
  • The easiest ways for somebody to find out your password is for them to watch you type it in (commonly known as “shoulder surfing”) or for them to find it written down.

Griffith Policies require that your account be kept safe, the following will help:

  • Ensure your password is at least 8 characters long and contains a combination of upper and lower case letters, numbers and punctuation.
  • Never re-use passwords, and never use a series of passwords which follow a predictable pattern (for example using the same word each time along with an incrementing number).
  • Use a different password for Griffith than what you use for banking, Facebook, and personal email.
  • Make it memorable. Longer passwords made up of several words can be easier to remember and safer.
  • Never share your password. Not even with colleagues, friends or family.
  • Never respond to any email which demands you reply with your username and password.
  • Griffith IT Support will NEVER ask you to give them your password via email, phone, or in person.

Critical Thinking : Data and Scientific Methods

The recent media attention surrounding alleged data manipulation by the Bureau of Meteorology, as discussed on The Conversation website, is a reminder to students to evaluate their data for reliability and credibility. The article highlights the methods used to remove non-climate-related changes referred to as “data homogenisation”, which eliminate and correct results that could ultimately indicate spurious results or trends. The Bureau of Meteorology wants to ensure that their data is consistent through time. Image of girl thinking

This discussion can encourage you to think critically about the methods used to collect and report on data. Many peer reviewed and scholarly articles accessed by students contain qualitative and quantitative data that has been collected using a variety of methods. Critical thinking means questioning and evaluating the information you are using within your assignments.

Possible questions that might help students show critical thinking in their assessment tasks include asking questions like:

  • How reliable and accurate is this data?
  • What methods were used to collect this information?
  • Have other studies been conducted with similar results?

When it comes to questioning the methods, the following questions may help:

  • What was the process researchers used to conduct their research?
  • What was the process used to collect the data?
  • Were the data presentation styles appropriate?

The ability to think critically is a skill that can assist you in demonstrating through your assessment tasks that you are questioning the information you are using. The ability to think critically allows you to further question reliability and validity. You may be motivated to look for alternative findings and additional research to determine whether the claims you are making in your assessment task are the most appropriate and valid.

For additional information on reading research methods and thinking critically, see the following library guides and resources:

Reading: reading effectively
Thinking Critically
Critical Thinking

If you are having difficulty with critical thinking and writing, our Learning Advisers in the Griffith Sciences Library and Learning Services team are here to help you. You can book a 20 minute consultation with a Learning Adviser on the library website.


This Week in the Library – Semester 2, Week 8

this-week-in-the-library

To view the entire workshop timetable, visit the Workshops and Training webpage on the library website.  Please note that some workshops require bookings – check on the website for more information.

Don’t forget about our consultation services – they can help with your Academic, Computing and Library Research Skills.

Workshop Date Start Time Campus Room
EndNote Monday, 15 September 01:00 PM Nathan N53_1.50
Are You Ready to be Social? Monday, 15 September 09:30 AM Gold Coast G10_2.04
Structuring and writing an academic assignment Tuesday, 16 September 10:00 AM Gold Coast G10_2.25
Excel: formulas and organising data Wednesday, 17 September 01:00 PM Nathan N53_1.50
Word: formatting for consistency Wednesday, 17 September 09:30 AM Gold Coast G10_2.04
Setting up your own topic or research question Thursday, 18 September 10:00 AM Gold Coast G10_2.25
EndNote Friday, 19 September 01:00 PM Gold Coast G10_2.04
Connecting with Google Friday, 19 September 01:00 PM Nathan N53_1.50

 


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